Apple's Mac mini now inexcusably getting trounced by cheap Intel hardware

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  • Reply 181 of 190
    DuhSesameDuhSesame Posts: 295member
    Isn't the only problem for Mac mini is the lack of update...
  • Reply 182 of 190
    djames4242djames4242 Posts: 491member
    cgWerks said:
    Mike Wuerthele said:
    I'm not certain I'd bother with the TB1 in the 2012 and an eGPU. It's doable, but man, the performance hit is rough.
    Yeah, it's just more of a... what's the alternative (if not going Hackintosh)? I need to buy something in the next month or so here, and it seems my options are 2012 quad-core Mini, Hackintosh, or 2013 Mac Pro. They all have potential downsides. The Mac Pro looks best for me, but I'm concerned about spending that much money if OS support drops off before, say, 4 years or so.

    I'm really hoping we'll see something at WWDC. But, I fear I'm just going to get disappointed.
    I faced this same dilemma last month and finally decided that I didn't want to spend nearly $1000 on a six-year-old quad-core Mac Mini because of the same concern over future support as you have. Since I tend to keep my machines for roughly seven years, I decided that it was worth spending $3000 on an almost fully-loaded iMac (4.2ghz, 1TB SSD, and 24gb RAM) because I wanted the option of adding more than 16gb or RAM down the road.

    My guess is that this is as much of a reason why the Mini isn't being updated. If those looking for a brand new Mac went for a fully-loaded Mac Mini for $2000, spending another $1000 to gain quad core (and a much faster CPU), much better graphics, memory upgradable past 16gb, and it comes with a gorgeous display - for most people that's a new brainer.

    That said, I'd personally still have opted for a $2000 Mini had a modern processor with a quad-core option been available.
  • Reply 183 of 190
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 1,630member
    djames4242 said:
    I faced this same dilemma last month and finally decided that I didn't want to spend nearly $1000 on a six-year-old quad-core Mac Mini because of the same concern over future support as you have. Since I tend to keep my machines for roughly seven years, I decided that it was worth spending $3000 on an almost fully-loaded iMac (4.2ghz, 1TB SSD, and 24gb RAM) because I wanted the option of adding more than 16gb or RAM down the road.

    My guess is that this is as much of a reason why the Mini isn't being updated. If those looking for a brand new Mac went for a fully-loaded Mac Mini for $2000, spending another $1000 to gain quad core (and a much faster CPU), much better graphics, memory upgradable past 16gb, and it comes with a gorgeous display - for most people that's a new brainer.

    That said, I'd personally still have opted for a $2000 Mini had a modern processor with a quad-core option been available.
    Yeah, my problem with the iMac, is that I want inputs on my display for other PCs/devices, and already have a monitor. I wouldn't mind the nice display on the iMac (which is better than what I have), but I don't want an all-in-one if I can avoid it. Also, at least in my past experience, the Mini was a bit more reliable under extended load and also more quiet (or at least a tolerable type of noise). But, I don't know about current iMacs, I've just heard they can get kind of loud.

    That would be the sticking point for a modern Mini potentially; the noise. So, I'd be better off with a Mac Pro (2013) in that regard. It just costs a lot more. You do certainly get more for your money with an iMac. It just isn't a great fit for me.
  • Reply 184 of 190
    lorin schultzlorin schultz Posts: 2,090member
    macxpress said:
    macxpress said:
    Even if Apple updated them today with modern specs...how many are gonna actually go buy one?
    I will. All Apple has to do is offer a recent quad-core i7 and I'm in.
    How about maybe an 8-core Apple designed CPU? Would you be interested in that? Just a general question out of curiosity...
    If a mini with an Apple CPU could mainstream software efficiently and be comparable to Intel-based products in terms of how long it takes to complete various tasks, I would buy it. If it means giving up compatibility with the software I use most, or adding a layer of hassle to make it play nice with the rest of the Apple gear in the house, probably not.

    There's also the issue of an Apple CPU supporting Thunderbolt. I haven't yet decided whether or not that would be a deal-breaker for me. Maybe not.
  • Reply 185 of 190
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,576member
    macxpress said:
    macxpress said:
    Even if Apple updated them today with modern specs...how many are gonna actually go buy one?
    I will. All Apple has to do is offer a recent quad-core i7 and I'm in.
    How about maybe an 8-core Apple designed CPU? Would you be interested in that? Just a general question out of curiosity...
    If a mini with an Apple CPU could mainstream software efficiently and be comparable to Intel-based products in terms of how long it takes to complete various tasks, I would buy it. If it means giving up compatibility with the software I use most, or adding a layer of hassle to make it play nice with the rest of the Apple gear in the house, probably not.

    There's also the issue of an Apple CPU supporting Thunderbolt. I haven't yet decided whether or not that would be a deal-breaker for me. Maybe not.
    Perhaps Apple could figure out a way to implement Thunderbolt. Isn't it supposed to be released without a license? Maybe this has already happened?
  • Reply 186 of 190
    tallest skiltallest skil Posts: 43,399member
    macxpress said:
    Perhaps Apple could figure out a way to implement Thunderbolt. Isn't it supposed to be released without a license? Maybe this has already happened?
    Given the fact that they co-developed it with Intel, you’d think there would be some leeway.
  • Reply 187 of 190
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    macxpress said:
    macxpress said:
    macxpress said:
    Even if Apple updated them today with modern specs...how many are gonna actually go buy one?
    I will. All Apple has to do is offer a recent quad-core i7 and I'm in.
    How about maybe an 8-core Apple designed CPU? Would you be interested in that? Just a general question out of curiosity...
    If a mini with an Apple CPU could mainstream software efficiently and be comparable to Intel-based products in terms of how long it takes to complete various tasks, I would buy it. If it means giving up compatibility with the software I use most, or adding a layer of hassle to make it play nice with the rest of the Apple gear in the house, probably not.

    There's also the issue of an Apple CPU supporting Thunderbolt. I haven't yet decided whether or not that would be a deal-breaker for me. Maybe not.
    Perhaps Apple could figure out a way to implement Thunderbolt. Isn't it supposed to be released without a license? Maybe this has already happened?
    If anyone can get Intel to license it to other architectures I'd say it's Apple, but I also don't think it's completely necessary with how far USB has advanced since TB1. Especially if we're taking about a low-end Macs.
  • Reply 188 of 190
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 896member
    macxpress said:
    macxpress said:
    Even if Apple updated them today with modern specs...how many are gonna actually go buy one?
    I will. All Apple has to do is offer a recent quad-core i7 and I'm in.
    How about maybe an 8-core Apple designed CPU? Would you be interested in that? Just a general question out of curiosity...
    If a mini with an Apple CPU could mainstream software efficiently and be comparable to Intel-based products in terms of how long it takes to complete various tasks, I would buy it. If it means giving up compatibility with the software I use most, or adding a layer of hassle to make it play nice with the rest of the Apple gear in the house, probably not.

    There's also the issue of an Apple CPU supporting Thunderbolt. I haven't yet decided whether or not that would be a deal-breaker for me. Maybe not.
    Apple's CPU already have PCIe bus in them for storage and USBc just need to up the bandwidth to attach the Thunderbolt chip instead of a pure USBc chip.
  • Reply 189 of 190
    I have been selling Mac's since the original. My first Mac was a 128K single floppy drive unit. It went through a number of upgrades before I replaced it. It seems like ages ago but that was 1984, Oh I guess that was ages ago. Anyway it now seems like ages ago since we have seen creativity in hardware from Apple. The Mac Mini is the best example of a loss of creativity and sensitivity to the market of small business computing. I work in a market where we replace Windows PC computers and do not need the full iMac in order to achieve the benefits of Apple's OS for these offices. I often migrate the PC to a Parallels or Fusion installation on the Mac so that they can still access the old PC apps and data if needed. This usually only lasts for a short period before they never use the Windows apps or refer back to the virtual Windows computer. The last rendition of the Mac Mini was a downgrade from previous versions and the 2012 i7 with two hard drives for $999 gave us the most bang for the buck. The performance was good enough to run both environments and with the 16 GB of RAM we could allot enough RAM to each OS. What really helped in convincing the offices we worked with was the fact that they did not have to buy new monitors or keyboards or mice. That saved them money and made the transition cost much lower (sometimes as many as 25 Mac Minis at a time were implemented) and there was less resistance to upgrading to a complete Mac office. Now the current crop of Mac Mini computers is a bit of a stretch especially if you want 16 GB of RAM (which you cannot upgrade yourself - sounds a lot like the closed architecture of my original Mac) and the hard drives are slow unless you upgrade to an SSD drive. The Processor is a dual-core i7 with fairly decent performance but not really current or satisfactory in performance for these offices. For a 3.0GHZ Dual-Core Intel i7 with 16 GB of RAM and a 512GB Flash Storage drive the cost is $1599 (way the heck out of reasonableness). The iMac equivalent is $2199. The i5 version is almost useless in most of these offices unless they only run a few apps and replace the slow 5400 rpm drive with a SSD drive and upgrade the RAM. The cost then becomes really not a comfortable fit for these offices when replacing 5 to 10 computers. So for many small businesses the cost to move to the Mac platform becomes a hinderance and generally we need to convince them to buy the iMac and upgrade them so they are generally spending a lot more. So you can imagine the resistance and negativity that occurs. In my humble opinion Apple has really missed the boat in this market. We need a small footprint Mac with respectable and flexible configurations. Many corporations and small businesses would be much happier and willing to buy these units and supply their own monitors, keyboards, mice and various selections of hard drives and ram configurations. If I was designing this it would have a neat SSD HD slot that could easily allow for a slide in upgraded drive and a simple memory door that would make it really easy to upgrade the RAM to at least 32 GB. Maybe this would be a drive empty case that you simply plugged an external drive on to and obviously connect other drives to as well. Some drives are so small that you could easily have a half inch thick Mac Mini and a small drive and take it too and from work almost like a portable and then plug in your monitor (of preference at home and work) and keyboards or mice as needed. Anyway, I hope Apple starts thinking outside the box again. I miss Steve in many ways and it seems that the creative visionary is missing at Apple currently. Only regarding hardware. Love the OS and progress at this years WWDC.
    maltz
  • Reply 190 of 190
    Thanks for this article. It was a refreshing, well-balanced article.
    I'm one of those people who is looking to jump ship from Windows 10, so I'm keeping an eye out for a Mac Mini refresh.

    Here's hoping we see something soon.
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