Switchers still healthy market for Apple, account for 20 percent of quarterly iPhone sales...

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 59
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,095moderator

    gatorguy said:
    Who cares about another report citing this or that statistic regarding iPhones?

    The bottom line is Apple is winning. They completely dominate the high-end market for phones and are more than happy to let 101 Android vendors fight over the table scraps.
    That may finally be changing at least a bit Eric. The ASP's since 2016 are up across the board with the exception of developed Asia (read China?). While North America prices are up a paltry 4% the worldwide revenues per device for Android phones were up 11% last year according to reports. In general folks are paying more for their smartphones which would presumably mean increased profits for the OEM's. 
    But it also pulls those higher priced Androids phones into direct competition with new iPhone models.  And that means that anyone considering buying one may also consider the iPhone, whereas people considering lower priced Andriod phones are less likely to add the iPhone to their comparison list.  Simply because it’s not in the same price range as those lower priced Androids they are considering.  So Android vendors convincing potential customers that $800+ is an appropriate price to pay for a smartphone is music to Apple’s ears.  
    netmagewatto_cobra
  • Reply 42 of 59
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,767member
    The problem with many looking at this is that those switchers from Android are mostly the most profitable high end of the market and that there are way way more Android users.

    When you put those two together it means that Apple could have way way more switchers proportionally than Android (which is not the case) and still have an increasing user base in the most lucrative segment of the market (what seems to be happening).

    Apple squeezes all the profits present and future (with a longer replacement cycle) and locks into their ecosystem nearly all the clients with the highest demos that they can cross-sell hardware and services to.

    I see a whole lot of BS and concern trolls online about Apple, wonder what kind of game they're trying to play.

    edited June 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 43 of 59
    I think we'll see a LOT more android switchers in the coming months now that the 6 and 6S models can be had for under £100. The Plus models are still a bawhair over £100 typically but that will entice many of the low-end big-screen android phablet owners to switch over. My father being one of them, I've handed him a 5S for free and he can't use it, too small, constantly on the look-out for a cheap 6 Plus which I'm sure will sway him.

    Incidentally, I picked up a 64GB SE for just £50 last week. Thought I'd scored a crazy bargain till I noticed loads more SEs trading for just £60-80 on facebook marketplace - it's a helluva phone for that price. 5Ss are just around £20-30 now as a result.
  • Reply 44 of 59
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 1,931member
    melgross said:
    lkrupp said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    See, that’s how people spin things to fit their personal bias. You can prove anything with statistics. Those who think Apple is a forward thinking, innovative company take an article like this as a positive. Those, apparently like yourself, who think the company is failing, irrelevant, not innovative, especially in the area of the dying desktop market, take an article like this as a sign of impending doom. I prefer to think positive.
    You’ve got me completely wrong. I most certainly don’t think Apple is failing. I also don’t think they aren’t innovating. But I also try to be objective. In addition to being a heavy user of their products, I also have 100,000 shares. I assure you that if I didn’t believe in Apple’s management, I would have divested myself of those shares.

    but what some people don’t seem to understand, is that there are forces beyond what innovation can account for. Just as in computers, we’ve reached a point with smartphones where, for most people, innovation has gotten ahead of what they think matters. So how many really think advanced AR is a feature to buy a phone for? How about FaceID? There are people who don’t like that idea at all.

    and 3D Touch. So far, most people either ignore it, or avoid using it. So is it a feature that sells phones, apparently not.

    the problem Apple and others, particularly Samsung have is that adding more, and new features is interesting fewer people. Many have reached the limit of what they want to do with their phone. Samsung, according to reports, as Samsung doesn’t release quarterly numbers for smartphone and tablet sales, has seen lower sales for its Galaxy S line each year since the Galaxy 4.

    the biggest sales jump for Apple came with the model 6 and 6+, because people saw larger screens as very desirable. So much so, that people who weren’t going to buy a phone that year did. People who weren’t going to buy a phone for two more years also gave in, to a lesser extent. It was obvious to me that the reason next year’s sales were down wasn’t because of lessened interest, as many were saying, but that the 50% increase in sales that year sucked sales from the next year, and some from the year later.

    but since then, people have been less interested in what came next. The X did very well because it added a number of innovations for those who were willing to pay the very high price.. supposedly, this year’s models will cost less, because it’s not new anymore, which leads to cost reductions. If so, we may see enhanced sales, but not the mad increase we saw with the 6, 6+.
    Dude — if you have $18+ million in Apple shares, you don’t need to be wasting time with doofus forum posters! Get out there and enjoy life!
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 45 of 59
    brucemcbrucemc Posts: 1,528member
    cropr said:
    tmay said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    No,

    They are keeping their iPhones longer, there is a vibrant trade in used/refurbished devices, with very few switchers to Android OS devices. Plenty of data available on the internets to that effect.

    Neil Cybart figures a steady 215 m iPhone sales a year for a while, which means that the average age of iPhones is growing.
    As long as the global smartphone market was growing, there were people claiming that there was a net flow from Android to Apple switchers. On average the newcomers bought more Android and switched later to Apple.  While there was no real proof of such a claim, this was at least mathematically possible

    But now the global market smartphone market is stagnating (and even slightly decreasing).  As the market share of Apple is not increasing, mathematically this can only mean that there number of Apple to Android switcher is roughly equal to the number of Android to Apple switchers
    You are mistaking sales figures & share, vs. installed base.  There are numerous analysis on the web (some require paid subscription) that indicate iPhone user base continues to expand each year, with an average of ~100M per year over the last 4-5 years (slowing down now though so under the 100M mark going forward).  As long as Apple's iPhone user base is growing, your statement is false.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 46 of 59
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    tmay said:
    melgross said:
    I would like to know how many older iPhone are given away, and how many are traded in to the phone company when a new model is purchased after the standard two years. Nothing here mentions that. We also really don’t know what happens to those phones that are traded in. I assume they’re refurbished and resold. But we have no numbers for it.
    http://www.asymco.com/2018/03/01/determining-the-average-apple-device-lifespan/
    Interesting, but that still doesn’t answer the question.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 47 of 59
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member

    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    You have to see those numbers in context of a flattening smartphone market where others are losing ground.  Increasing very slightly, or at all, in a stagnant market is a good thing.  See also... Mac sales over the last ten years.  Holding their own in a declining market.  The thibg to keep our eyes on now is not whether iPhone sales grow, but on how Apple does in new product categories that are taking over where the smartphone left off.  Apple did spectacularly in the product categories that took over, and perhaps caused, the PC decline; those being smartphones and tablets.  And so we should look to see how Apple does in wearables and other new I/O paradigms (AR, VR) to determine the future health of the company.
    Well yes. I said this already. The overall smartphone market is shrinking in yearly sales. If Apple can keep sales steady, or increase by just a little bit, their marketshare will slowly creep up, as it did last year, and this year, so far.

    as far as other product lines go, it’s really tough. Look at what happened to the spectacular iPad sales rise. If things had continued to rise, though more slowly than before, instead of retrenching, Apple would be selling more than 125 million iPads a year now. I bought the gen 2 Apple Watch, and then the gen 3 LTE. It literally saved my life, and I would never give it up. But sales are what, around 8 to 12 million a year now (though increasing)?

    i read stupid articles about how Apple isn’t innovating anymore because they haven’t come up with any major product categories in years. That’s crazy! What do people expect? What new product categories are there to come up with? So we see them working one autonomous software and sensor arrays. I do t understand what Apple is planning to do with that without making cars as well. What auto manufacturer will be buying these from a third party such as Apple?

    by the way, and this is a site problem I’m having. When the keyboard comes up on my iPad, it hides the post I’m typing, because the post box is all the way at the bottom of the page, so I can’t scroll it up. Right now, for this iPad Pro 12.9” I’m on the iOS 12 beta. Am I the only one with this problem?
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 48 of 59
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    blastdoor said:
    melgross said:
    lkrupp said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    See, that’s how people spin things to fit their personal bias. You can prove anything with statistics. Those who think Apple is a forward thinking, innovative company take an article like this as a positive. Those, apparently like yourself, who think the company is failing, irrelevant, not innovative, especially in the area of the dying desktop market, take an article like this as a sign of impending doom. I prefer to think positive.
    You’ve got me completely wrong. I most certainly don’t think Apple is failing. I also don’t think they aren’t innovating. But I also try to be objective. In addition to being a heavy user of their products, I also have 100,000 shares. I assure you that if I didn’t believe in Apple’s management, I would have divested myself of those shares.

    but what some people don’t seem to understand, is that there are forces beyond what innovation can account for. Just as in computers, we’ve reached a point with smartphones where, for most people, innovation has gotten ahead of what they think matters. So how many really think advanced AR is a feature to buy a phone for? How about FaceID? There are people who don’t like that idea at all.

    and 3D Touch. So far, most people either ignore it, or avoid using it. So is it a feature that sells phones, apparently not.

    the problem Apple and others, particularly Samsung have is that adding more, and new features is interesting fewer people. Many have reached the limit of what they want to do with their phone. Samsung, according to reports, as Samsung doesn’t release quarterly numbers for smartphone and tablet sales, has seen lower sales for its Galaxy S line each year since the Galaxy 4.

    the biggest sales jump for Apple came with the model 6 and 6+, because people saw larger screens as very desirable. So much so, that people who weren’t going to buy a phone that year did. People who weren’t going to buy a phone for two more years also gave in, to a lesser extent. It was obvious to me that the reason next year’s sales were down wasn’t because of lessened interest, as many were saying, but that the 50% increase in sales that year sucked sales from the next year, and some from the year later.

    but since then, people have been less interested in what came next. The X did very well because it added a number of innovations for those who were willing to pay the very high price.. supposedly, this year’s models will cost less, because it’s not new anymore, which leads to cost reductions. If so, we may see enhanced sales, but not the mad increase we saw with the 6, 6+.
    Dude — if you have $18+ million in Apple shares, you don’t need to be wasting time with doofus forum posters! Get out there and enjoy life!
    I am enjoying life. I know some of the guys hers for almost 15 years. We kid each other all the time, though some who don’t know us think we’re serious.

    apple has been my best investment. My current stock comes from mid 2004. It’s split 14 times since then. The price was $16.93. Just imagine! A small investment of around $100,000 back then. Everyone telling me to sell over the years.
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 49 of 59
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,312member
    melgross said:
    blastdoor said:
    melgross said:
    lkrupp said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    See, that’s how people spin things to fit their personal bias. You can prove anything with statistics. Those who think Apple is a forward thinking, innovative company take an article like this as a positive. Those, apparently like yourself, who think the company is failing, irrelevant, not innovative, especially in the area of the dying desktop market, take an article like this as a sign of impending doom. I prefer to think positive.
    You’ve got me completely wrong. I most certainly don’t think Apple is failing. I also don’t think they aren’t innovating. But I also try to be objective. In addition to being a heavy user of their products, I also have 100,000 shares. I assure you that if I didn’t believe in Apple’s management, I would have divested myself of those shares.

    but what some people don’t seem to understand, is that there are forces beyond what innovation can account for. Just as in computers, we’ve reached a point with smartphones where, for most people, innovation has gotten ahead of what they think matters. So how many really think advanced AR is a feature to buy a phone for? How about FaceID? There are people who don’t like that idea at all.

    and 3D Touch. So far, most people either ignore it, or avoid using it. So is it a feature that sells phones, apparently not.

    the problem Apple and others, particularly Samsung have is that adding more, and new features is interesting fewer people. Many have reached the limit of what they want to do with their phone. Samsung, according to reports, as Samsung doesn’t release quarterly numbers for smartphone and tablet sales, has seen lower sales for its Galaxy S line each year since the Galaxy 4.

    the biggest sales jump for Apple came with the model 6 and 6+, because people saw larger screens as very desirable. So much so, that people who weren’t going to buy a phone that year did. People who weren’t going to buy a phone for two more years also gave in, to a lesser extent. It was obvious to me that the reason next year’s sales were down wasn’t because of lessened interest, as many were saying, but that the 50% increase in sales that year sucked sales from the next year, and some from the year later.

    but since then, people have been less interested in what came next. The X did very well because it added a number of innovations for those who were willing to pay the very high price.. supposedly, this year’s models will cost less, because it’s not new anymore, which leads to cost reductions. If so, we may see enhanced sales, but not the mad increase we saw with the 6, 6+.
    Dude — if you have $18+ million in Apple shares, you don’t need to be wasting time with doofus forum posters! Get out there and enjoy life!
    I am enjoying life. I know some of the guys hers for almost 15 years. We kid each other all the time, though some who don’t know us think we’re serious.

    apple has been my best investment. My current stock comes from mid 2004. It’s split 14 times since then. The price was $16.93. Just imagine! A small investment of around $100,000 back then. Everyone telling me to sell over the years.
    I did the opposite, with about 7,000 stock pre (all) split(s) I took some profits way back when. Needed it for a house.

    Well done you, nevertheless. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 50 of 59
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,312member
    Given some of the points made here, I believe Apple will cut prices at the lower end in the next few years. I also think that they will migrate the X form factor down the line, even to the 5S ( or its replacement). 
  • Reply 51 of 59
    NotsofastNotsofast Posts: 389member
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    Not enough time to go through all the math,  but your central logic failure has to do with there not being a finite group of users who keep their phones only for one year.
    edited June 2018
  • Reply 52 of 59
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    Notsofast said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    Not enough time to go through all the math,  but your central logic failure has to do with there not being a finite group of users who keep their phones only for one year.
    What? You mean that there an infinite sized group who keep their  phones for only one year?

    still most buyers of high end phones upgrade after 2 years, as the three of us at home do. And no, a few people coming on and saying that they don’t doesnt change it.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 53 of 59
    Even if iPhone sales growth rate is small, I'll look at that in a positive light. What choice do I have? Tim Cook seems to be so conservative with everything he does. I'm not expecting anything exciting to come out of Apple. Just the usual batch of new iPhones. That really doesn't cut it on Wall Street. Apple has to at least try to excite investors with some amazing new product or product category.
  • Reply 54 of 59
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,312member
    melgross said:
    Notsofast said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    Not enough time to go through all the math,  but your central logic failure has to do with there not being a finite group of users who keep their phones only for one year.
    What? You mean that there an infinite sized group who keep their  phones for only one year?

    still most buyers of high end phones upgrade after 2 years, as the three of us at home do. And no, a few people coming on and saying that they don’t doesnt change it.
    No offence Mel but you are not grasping the arguments here. Its clear that both the upgrade cycling is elongating, and that a far percentage of iPhones are not retired. 
  • Reply 55 of 59
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    asdasd said:
    melgross said:
    Notsofast said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    Not enough time to go through all the math,  but your central logic failure has to do with there not being a finite group of users who keep their phones only for one year.
    What? You mean that there an infinite sized group who keep their  phones for only one year?

    still most buyers of high end phones upgrade after 2 years, as the three of us at home do. And no, a few people coming on and saying that they don’t doesnt change it.
    No offence Mel but you are not grasping the arguments here. Its clear that both the upgrade cycling is elongating, and that a far percentage of iPhones are not retired. 
    I know a lot of phones aren’t retired. But so far, I haven’t seen a credible analysis showing that we’ve seen a significant lengthing of upgrade times.
  • Reply 56 of 59
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,819member
    melgross said:
    asdasd said:
    melgross said:
    Notsofast said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    Not enough time to go through all the math,  but your central logic failure has to do with there not being a finite group of users who keep their phones only for one year.
    What? You mean that there an infinite sized group who keep their  phones for only one year?

    still most buyers of high end phones upgrade after 2 years, as the three of us at home do. And no, a few people coming on and saying that they don’t doesnt change it.
    No offence Mel but you are not grasping the arguments here. Its clear that both the upgrade cycling is elongating, and that a far percentage of iPhones are not retired. 
    I know a lot of phones aren’t retired. But so far, I haven’t seen a credible analysis showing that we’ve seen a significant lengthing of upgrade times.
    Mel,

    I gave you the link that has the cumulative information of all Mac, iPod Touch, iPhone, iPad and Watch to 4th quarter 2017. It's a credible analysis.

    Here's the graph's;

    http://www.asymco.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Screen-Shot-2018-03-01-at-3.11.47-PM.png

    Pretty obvious that the product mix, overwhelmingly iPhones, has seen an increase in average lifespan by a factor of three since Q2 of 2013. 


    edited June 2018 asdasd
  • Reply 57 of 59
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    tmay said:
    melgross said:
    asdasd said:
    melgross said:
    Notsofast said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    Not enough time to go through all the math,  but your central logic failure has to do with there not being a finite group of users who keep their phones only for one year.
    What? You mean that there an infinite sized group who keep their  phones for only one year?

    still most buyers of high end phones upgrade after 2 years, as the three of us at home do. And no, a few people coming on and saying that they don’t doesnt change it.
    No offence Mel but you are not grasping the arguments here. Its clear that both the upgrade cycling is elongating, and that a far percentage of iPhones are not retired. 
    I know a lot of phones aren’t retired. But so far, I haven’t seen a credible analysis showing that we’ve seen a significant lengthing of upgrade times.
    Mel,

    I gave you the link that has the cumulative information of all Mac, iPod Touch, iPhone, iPad and Watch to 4th quarter 2017. It's a credible analysis.

    Here's the graph's;

    http://www.asymco.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/Screen-Shot-2018-03-01-at-3.11.47-PM.png

    Pretty obvious that the product mix, overwhelmingly iPhones, has seen an increase in average lifespan by a factor of three since Q2 of 2013. 


    The information is just too mixed up to really be able to parse it out properly. I’m not saying that hold times haven’t become longer, but I really don’t see definitive evidence that it has. iPad hold has lengthened considerably, as we know, but that began year s ago, and has been a major problem. But a lot of this can simply be ascribed to the fact that the smartphone is becoming saturated, and that growth has slowed down. It doesn’t mean necessarily that current owners are holding much longer, but that the growth in new phone buyers has slowed because most people who want a smartphone now have them, and a smaller amount of people, percentage-wise, are buying them as a first phone.
  • Reply 58 of 59
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,819member
    melgross said:
    tmay said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    No,

    They are keeping their iPhones longer, there is a vibrant trade in used/refurbished devices, with very few switchers to Android OS devices. Plenty of data available on the internets to that effect.

    Neil Cybart figures a steady 215 m iPhone sales a year for a while, which means that the average age of iPhones is growing.
    That doesn’t actually address the issue. That number is less than what we are expecting, and a good 15 million less than Apple’s high. There is also information out there that says that Apple’s loyalty percentage is lower than Samsung’s.

    what is possible,  despite your statement, is that almost as many iPhone users are switching away, as are coming in. I know several who are so unhappy with Siri that they switched. Another long time iPhone user switched, and says that android is more intuitive. True? Well, that’s his opinion.
    The information that I have a link for shows that Apple has the highest device brand loyalty in the U.S., and Android OS has the highest platform loyalty, not by much, over iOS.

    Samsung doesn't have a higher loyalty rate than Apple, at least in the U.S.

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/18/04/18/apples-iphone-holds-crown-for-owner-loyalty-as-samsung-retains-lead-in-us-smartphone-activations

    edited June 2018
  • Reply 59 of 59
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,743member
    tmay said:
    melgross said:
    tmay said:
    melgross said:
    But, realistically, things don’t look as good as some might believe. If 15-20% of Apple’s yearly iPhone sales come from switchers, and Apple’s total iPhone sales are only increasing very slightly, such as the 3% last year, what does that say about iPhone users overall? Are they switching to android?
    No,

    They are keeping their iPhones longer, there is a vibrant trade in used/refurbished devices, with very few switchers to Android OS devices. Plenty of data available on the internets to that effect.

    Neil Cybart figures a steady 215 m iPhone sales a year for a while, which means that the average age of iPhones is growing.
    That doesn’t actually address the issue. That number is less than what we are expecting, and a good 15 million less than Apple’s high. There is also information out there that says that Apple’s loyalty percentage is lower than Samsung’s.

    what is possible,  despite your statement, is that almost as many iPhone users are switching away, as are coming in. I know several who are so unhappy with Siri that they switched. Another long time iPhone user switched, and says that android is more intuitive. True? Well, that’s his opinion.
    The information that I have a link for shows that Apple has the highest device brand loyalty in the U.S., and Android OS has the highest platform loyalty, not by much, over iOS.

    Samsung doesn't have a higher loyalty rate than Apple, at least in the U.S.

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/18/04/18/apples-iphone-holds-crown-for-owner-loyalty-as-samsung-retains-lead-in-us-smartphone-activations

    What I see when I read all of these reports, and there are a lot of them, is that the loyalty numbers change every time a new phone model comes out. Now, Apple is up again. In a month, Android and Samsung will be up. Then after Apple’s new phones come out, they will be up again.

    apple benefits from being the minority system, so it can pull more people to it whether Apple’s brand loyalty is higher or lower.
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