Apple hits $1 trillion market cap, the first US company ever to hit milestone [u]

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  • Reply 61 of 146
    chasmchasm Posts: 832member
    To Steve or Tim or anyone really associated with Apple directly, the valuation simply means what it has always meant: stability for the future. So it is great news even if the milestone is nearly meaningless.*

    To investors, it means the stock went up (yay!) and that it may continue going up, because more people will see that the company is doing extremely well and yet remains undervalued. It's also a psychological boost for the US economy generally, and for us long-time users it is nice to see a company that puts consumers first get this milestone rather than the pyramid scheme that is Amazon or the spyware company that is Google.

    * Technically, the story is incorrect; other companies have reached the $1T valuation before, but I think Apple is the first publicly-traded company to manage it; it is certainly the first on the US stock exchanges to achieve it.
    SpamSandwichwatto_cobradragan0405
  • Reply 62 of 146
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,453member
    chasm said:

    * Technically, the story is incorrect; other companies have reached the $1T valuation before, but I think Apple is the first publicly-traded company to manage it; it is certainly the first on the US stock exchanges to achieve it.
    There were other publicly traded companies that did it. Dutch East India Company...posted about them earlier.  The first US company to do it though from what I could find.

    https://www.fool.com/investing/general/2012/08/22/a-history-of-ridiculously-big-companies.aspx

  • Reply 63 of 146
    Soli said:
    danvm said:
    Apple is the first US company with $1T valuation, and second worldwide, behind PetroChina. 


    Get serious here. Petrochina is/was a joke. The stock runup that it had which put it briefly at $1T was a silly little bubble for a commodity company in a nascent Chinese exchange that was having trouble pricing its stocks in its early days. It is at ~25% of that value now, which is closer to its true price.

    The beauty is AAPL is still an undervalued company at this price. It will continue to grow from this level, (in that process, it surely will fall below that number as well, I.e., there will be volatility). It is the first legitimate trillion dollar company. Period. 
    Yes, let's get serious. If we don't count PetroChina's single day blip to $1T USD then why should we could Apple's? How about we save the party favors and rejoicing in the streets until the milestone can be sustained, not just a very brief, inter-day spike in the market?
    Re-read my post. Then try getting serious. 

    In any event, the point is moot ex-post (no pun intended). 
    edited August 2 SpamSandwichwatto_cobra
  • Reply 64 of 146
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    icoco3 said:
    chasm said:

    * Technically, the story is incorrect; other companies have reached the $1T valuation before, but I think Apple is the first publicly-traded company to manage it; it is certainly the first on the US stock exchanges to achieve it.
    There were other publicly traded companies that did it. Dutch East India Company...posted about them earlier.  The first US company to do it though from what I could find.

    https://www.fool.com/investing/general/2012/08/22/a-history-of-ridiculously-big-companies.aspx
    You can't count DEIC as being the first company to hit $1T USD because it never happened. They only reach that valuation after adjust for over 300 years of inflation and other metrics.

    As far as I know, the Netherlands moved completely over to to the Euro and the article you link to mentions Dutch guilders. One currency convertor I found says that 78MM guilders would be equal to 41.12MM US dollars, and another says it would be 43.57MM US dollars.

    edited August 2 ronn
  • Reply 65 of 146
    FolioFolio Posts: 380member
    Despite the $1T market cap, Apple still relatively lithe and nimble. Brand still feels youthful, not stodgy. Innovation and ambition strong. And yes still much spring in its stock. Bravo to all its producers and consumers for creating such value.
    radarthekatpalominewatto_cobra
  • Reply 66 of 146
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    Soli said:
    danvm said:
    Apple is the first US company with $1T valuation, and second worldwide, behind PetroChina.  


    Get serious here. Petrochina is/was a joke. The stock runup that it had which put it briefly at $1T was a silly little bubble for a commodity company in a nascent Chinese exchange that was having trouble pricing its stocks in its early days. It is at ~25% of that value now, which is closer to its true price.

    The beauty is AAPL is still an undervalued company at this price. It will continue to grow from this level, (in that process, it surely will fall below that number as well, I.e., there will be volatility). It is the first legitimate trillion dollar company. Period. 
    Yes, let's get serious. If we don't count PetroChina's single day blip to $1T USD then why should we could Apple's? How about we save the party favors and rejoicing in the streets until the milestone can be sustained, not just a very brief, inter-day spike in the market?
    Re-read my post. Then try getting serious. 

    In any event, the point is moot ex-post (no pun intended). 
    Your comment came when there was just a momentary rise above $1T before falling again. Now that the market is closed and AAPL is at a $1T+ valuation we can mark that as a bona fide milestone… with an asterisk, because I'd like to see it be sustainable than simply being part of a blip or bubble. Even though I wholeheartedly agree that Apple is woefully undervalued, the stock market doesn't seem to care about such things.
    edited August 2 radarthekatronn
  • Reply 67 of 146
    icoco3icoco3 Posts: 1,453member
    Soli said:
    icoco3 said:
    chasm said:

    * Technically, the story is incorrect; other companies have reached the $1T valuation before, but I think Apple is the first publicly-traded company to manage it; it is certainly the first on the US stock exchanges to achieve it.
    There were other publicly traded companies that did it. Dutch East India Company...posted about them earlier.  The first US company to do it though from what I could find.

    https://www.fool.com/investing/general/2012/08/22/a-history-of-ridiculously-big-companies.aspx
    You can't count DEIC as being the first company to hit $1T USD because it never happened. They only reach that valuation after adjust for over 300 years of inflation and other metrics.
    Just trying to compare Apples to Apples.  People do comparisons all the time adjusting for inflation.
    radarthekat
  • Reply 68 of 146
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    Folio said:
    Despite the $1T market cap, Apple still relatively lithe and nimble. Brand still feels youthful, not stodgy. Innovation and ambition strong. And yes still much spring in its stock. Bravo to all its producers and consumers for creating such value.
    1) I wholeheartedly agree with you, but there are many that think Apple is nothing but stodgy.

    2) They reported a great quarter, but their next quarter is what has caused this milestone to hit today/this week. I can't wait to see what new products they're going to announce in under 2 months.
    radarthekat
  • Reply 69 of 146
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    icoco3 said:
    Soli said:
    icoco3 said:
    chasm said:

    * Technically, the story is incorrect; other companies have reached the $1T valuation before, but I think Apple is the first publicly-traded company to manage it; it is certainly the first on the US stock exchanges to achieve it.
    There were other publicly traded companies that did it. Dutch East India Company...posted about them earlier.  The first US company to do it though from what I could find.

    https://www.fool.com/investing/general/2012/08/22/a-history-of-ridiculously-big-companies.aspx
    You can't count DEIC as being the first company to hit $1T USD because it never happened. They only reach that valuation after adjust for over 300 years of inflation and other metrics.
    Just trying to compare Apples to Apples.  People do comparisons all the time adjusting for inflation.
    Sure, but I didn't see you note that DEIC's valuation is adjusting for 4 centuries of inflation so I read your comment as an unadjusted value. To me, that's a pretty big asterisk.

    DEIC was an impressive—even if horrible and brutal—company. They had about 1.3 centuries of soaring profits before finally faltering, and even that took 70 years before they were dismantled.

    The article to which you link also noted that their success happened during Tulip Mania, which is known as the first economic bubble. That's not unlike the DotCom bubble where even very successful companies around today are still only worth a fraction of their value of the late 90s.





    edited August 2 anantksundaramGG1
  • Reply 70 of 146
    FolioFolio Posts: 380member
    Aramco in Saudi Arabia might be bigger if goes public. But it relies on oil reserves and captive demand. Apple exceptionally different. Its consumers many choices. So in my view more deserving of accolades. Though I belittled it before, I’m happy Apple won this horse race. Cheers to Cook & Company!
    Solipalominewatto_cobradragan0405
  • Reply 71 of 146
    Soli said:

    Sure, but I didn't see you note that DEIC's valuation is adjusting for 3 centuries of inflation so I read your comment as an unadjusted value. To me, that's a pretty big asterisk.

    DEIC was an impressive—even if horrible and brutal—company. They had about 1.3 centuries of soaring profits before finally faltering, and even that took 70 years before they were dismantled.
    Agree^ and Agree^^^

    Btw, an interesting (vaguely related) postscript: some obscure Indian company bought the British East India company a few years ago, for a pittance. Not sure whether DEIC exists any more as either a legal entity or as a brand name. 
    radarthekat
  • Reply 72 of 146

    icoco3 said:
    Soli said:
    icoco3 said:
    chasm said:

    * Technically, the story is incorrect; other companies have reached the $1T valuation before, but I think Apple is the first publicly-traded company to manage it; it is certainly the first on the US stock exchanges to achieve it.
    There were other publicly traded companies that did it. Dutch East India Company...posted about them earlier.  The first US company to do it though from what I could find.

    https://www.fool.com/investing/general/2012/08/22/a-history-of-ridiculously-big-companies.aspx
    You can't count DEIC as being the first company to hit $1T USD because it never happened. They only reach that valuation after adjust for over 300 years of inflation and other metrics.
    Just trying to compare Apples to Apples.  People do comparisons all the time adjusting for inflation.
    There is no inherently obvious reason to do it in the case of stocks, which are typically valued using cash flows, discount rates, and growth rates all of which include the effects of inflation.  
  • Reply 73 of 146
    FolioFolio Posts: 380member
    Incredibly did it my way. Or “i-way.” No big buys like YouTube Whole Food What’s App or Linked In. Biggest just tiny Beats.
    radarthekatwatto_cobradragan0405
  • Reply 74 of 146
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    Soli said:

    Sure, but I didn't see you note that DEIC's valuation is adjusting for 3 centuries of inflation so I read your comment as an unadjusted value. To me, that's a pretty big asterisk.

    DEIC was an impressive—even if horrible and brutal—company. They had about 1.3 centuries of soaring profits before finally faltering, and even that took 70 years before they were dismantled.
    Agree^ and Agree^^^

    Btw, an interesting (vaguely related) postscript: some obscure Indian company bought the British East India company a few years ago, for a pittance. Not sure whether DEIC exists any more as either a legal entity or as a brand name. 
    My understanding is that it was reabsorbed black into the Dutch gov't in 1799 where it started, but I could be completely wrong about that.
    radarthekat
  • Reply 75 of 146
    foggyhillfoggyhill Posts: 4,752member
    Rarely mentioned ... (OK, never mentioned), is that IBM got quite a bit above 1 trillion way back when (the 70's), when you adjust for inflation. 

    But sure, a Trillion is a huge milestone, and I'm not unhappy that Apple was the one to make it. They're still underdogs on Wall Street and while that is weird, it doesn't really matter. They did it the old-fashioned way, and not on hype. 
    It's actually I think in the late 1960s... And they still dominated for the next 15 years after that. Going to the top is not "doom".
    IBM's errors were a long time after they got to their highest capitalization.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 76 of 146
    anomeanome Posts: 1,113member
    cornchip said:
    hentaiboy said:
    Man I wish Sog35 was still around. Didn’t he sell all his AAPL stock @ $150?
    That guy really went off the rails.

    So would he be singing Tim's praises because of reaching US$1T, or complaining they would have got there sooner if they'd dumped him? His mood seemed tuned to the stock valuation, but never in a really predictable way.

    Anyway, US$1T is just a number. It's a big number, and it's more than any other company currently on the stock market, but in many ways you might as well celebrate them passing US$983M (he said, plucking an arbitrarily big number out of thin air). The problem is round numbers have psychological effects on people and markets. US$1T is viewed very differently to US$999.99M. What happens next may be interesting, and not necessarily in a good way.

    radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 77 of 146
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,036member
    danvm said:
    Apple is the first US company with $1T valuation, and second worldwide, behind PetroChina. 


    And that heavily government manipulated IPO and after, blew up. It’s worth something over $200 billion today.
    ronn
  • Reply 78 of 146
    melgrossmelgross Posts: 31,036member
    maestro64 said:
    danvm said:
    Apple is the first US company with $1T valuation, and second worldwide, behind PetroChina. 



    I just love these guys who try to claim Apple stock only went up due the buy back, Apple only bought back 20% of the outstanding shares over the last 5 yrs. and this guy is claiming it value increase 42%. If a company who was not growing it business this could be true, Apple continue to grow it business during this time. Apple could have hit $1T sooner if they were not taking stock out of the float. Could have possibly done more things with the money grew the stock more. But no knows any of the what ifs, but to simple claim it this mark due to stock buy back it not true.

    Bah! I’ve been complaining about buybacks for years before the internet was around. It’s a lot of nonsense. A stock may go up temporarily, a bit. But it comes down again. Sales and profits, along with prospects for the future is what drives stock prices. Nobody can prove buybacks do much of anything. I’ve read a number of papers by economists over the decades lauding buybacks, but not a single one can actually prove they work. We read about how the equity per share drives the price up, but that’s crap. We read about other per share numbers, but that crap too.

    all that has to be done is to look at Amazon’s share price, or, even worse, Tesla’s. And Fitbit just had a terrible quarter,  it was not quite as bad as expected (after a series of bad quarters), and the stock went up. On its way down, Hp kept on buying shares back, but they just kept dropping.

    who benefits from buybacks? The companies who buy the shares just before, make a small profit on the short up, and then sell again.

    in all of this, the buyback monkeys say that it would have been worse without the buybacks, but they can’t prove it.
    edited August 2 SpamSandwichronndragan0405
  • Reply 79 of 146
    claire1claire1 Posts: 446unconfirmed, member
    Rayz2016 said:

    Intra-day lasted like 1 second.
    As long as as second, eh?

    Not bad.

    The obsession with this trillion dollar company thing is getting ridiculous. 
    Doesn't count if it lasts less than 2 seconds or if the company starts with the letter A.

    P.S. Amazon is an exemption because they sell things.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 80 of 146
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,283member
    Soli said:

    Sure, but I didn't see you note that DEIC's valuation is adjusting for 3 centuries of inflation so I read your comment as an unadjusted value. To me, that's a pretty big asterisk.

    DEIC was an impressive—even if horrible and brutal—company. They had about 1.3 centuries of soaring profits before finally faltering, and even that took 70 years before they were dismantled.
    Agree^ and Agree^^^

    Btw, an interesting (vaguely related) postscript: some obscure Indian company bought the British East India company a few years ago, for a pittance. Not sure whether DEIC exists any more as either a legal entity or as a brand name. 
    That is interesting. I don't recall reading about that.


    I wonder how much Mehta paid for it in total.

    Mehta gradually bought stakes in these companies over a period of 18 months, buying out the last investor in 2006. He states that he purchased the business from 30–40 owners in 2005.



    PS: AI staff, can you fix the issue with Quiller Media that doesn't recognize complete hyperlinks if they contain parentheses?
    edited August 2
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