Logitech reveals its first vertical mouse, the MX Vertical

Posted:
in Current Mac Hardware edited August 2018
Logitech has revealed the MX Vertical, a new Mac and Windows mouse intended to reduce muscle strain for some people by putting the wrist in a less stressful position.

Logitech MX Vertical


The mouse's main buttons and scrollwheel are side-facing, found near the crest of a "wave" shape. The thumb is meant to rest firmly on the opposite side of the wave, and further aiding grip is a rubber surface.

Two customizable buttons can be found on the mouse's left side. Up top is a button that typically controls pointer speed, though it can still be customized via Logitech's Options software, which also supports gesture-based system shortcuts such as skipping tracks by combining the Function key with swiping the mouse left or right.

The device is hooked up to a Mac via Bluetooth, USB-C, or Logitech's special receiver dongle. When operating in wireless mode it should be able to run four months on a single charge, and reclaim three hours after a minute of charging.

Sensitivity can be scaled from 400 to 4,000 DPI. Other features include Logitech's Flow technology, which offers the ability to switch between two computers without repairing, as well as copy-and-paste tools.

Online preorders for the MX Vertical start Monday at a cost of $99.99. The mouse should ship sometime in September, coming to retail stores around the same time. Macs must be running macOS 10.11 or later.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 31,316member
    Now they’ll have to make a left-handed mouse also... We’ve reached “peak mouses”.
    lkruppcornchip
  • Reply 2 of 13
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,954member
    I don't have one of these of course.   But, when I simulate using one, my movement seems to be more crude and less precise when my thumb is up rather than down & to the left.   It could be that different muscles are engaged when the wrist is rotated like that.

    Or, it might be that after 25 years or so of using a mouse my brain & muscles have acclimated to the old conventional position.   And, if so, then they would likely acclimate to the new position as well.

    But my money is on the former.
  • Reply 3 of 13
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 952member
    In the modern age of Bluetooth, why do Logitech's products still require users to tie-up one of their USB ports with a dongle? And why does no one bitch about that?

    The same people that complain about needing an HDMI dongle for their iPad are perfectly fine using a dongle for a wireless mouse and keyboard.
    watto_cobracornchip
  • Reply 4 of 13
    I have been using a vertical mouse for more than a decade. It really is way less stressful than a horizontal mouse, especially if you have any wrist/arm issues like I do. I also have a Magic Trackpad 2; between the two of them I'm comfortable working all day. I'm an artist/designer, and no, there's no loss of control. I have the Anker version because it's way better quality the my previous "Evoluent Vertical Mouse II", which fell apart. Can't wait to try this new one!
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 13
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,365member
    I don't have one of these of course.   But, when I simulate using one, my movement seems to be more crude and less precise when my thumb is up rather than down & to the left.   It could be that different muscles are engaged when the wrist is rotated like that.

    Or, it might be that after 25 years or so of using a mouse my brain & muscles have acclimated to the old conventional position.   And, if so, then they would likely acclimate to the new position as well.

    But my money is on the former.
    I've been thinking much the same thing. The wrist angle looks of be more comfortable, but I'm not sure if fine motor control is reduced, and if it's limited by the angle or muscle memory. My general preference is for a trackball anyway.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 13
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,125member
    Logitech deserves credit for filling just about every possible niche in mouse technology even though some of their products have a limited audience. After trying just about every mouse and trackball product I settled on using thumb operated trackballs over using a conventional mouse. The Logitech MX Ergo wireless (and bluetooth without need of a dongle!) trackball is my primary pointing device and the Apple Magic Trackpad 2 is my secondary pointing/gesturing device. Both are always within easy reach and active at the same time. For some reason I find the trackball to be far more efficient with text editors, word processors, spreadsheets, etc., than the trackpad. The trackpad is more efficient for web browsing and photo editing. These are all based on personal preference, which is again why Logitech is to be commended for accommodating such a varied crowd of people who do pointy things.

    Moving from a conventional mouse to a trackball took some getting used to, but since moving to a thumb operated trackball decades ago I've had no RSI issues with my wrist at all, which was previously suffering from painful carpal tunnel syndrome and nerve damage. It is kind of amusing to watch a long term mouse user try to drive my machine using the trackball. Of course I'll remind them that having an opposable thumb is one of the more useful attributes that humans are endowed with, so why not put it to good use? In addition to the thumb utilization benefits of a trackball, the fact that it always remains in exactly the same place next to your keyboard and can be used on any surface, even your lap,  is very beneficial. Being wireless is icing on the cake. 

    My least favorite pointing device, discounting el cheapo wired mice, is the Apple Magic Mouse. It's a genius design functionally with amazing versatility as a result of the track surface, but it just doesn't fit my hand quite right. It's too damn flat and slippery and my fingers don't rest on the surface. To use the Magic Mouse I have to clench the sides of the mouse with my thumb and 3rd finger and keep my index and middle finger floating above the mouse for activating left, right, and dual clicks and for performing one-finger and two-finger gestures. This is exactly what Apple intended and the design of the mouse forces your fingers into compliance. Yeah, it's a brilliant design, but I don't know what impact those floating fingers have on your carpal tunnel tendons. Could be just fine, but I'm not going to experiment on myself.
    edited August 2018 watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 13
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,125member
    razorpit said:
    In the modern age of Bluetooth, why do Logitech's products still require users to tie-up one of their USB ports with a dongle? And why does no one bitch about that?

    The same people that complain about needing an HDMI dongle for their iPad are perfectly fine using a dongle for a wireless mouse and keyboard.
    Not an issue.

    You should check Logitech's web site.

    Almost all of their newer products including the vertical mouse mentioned in this article support Bluetooth. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 13
    Can't somebody do a Kickstarter for a tilted stand for a Magic Trackpad?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 13
    larz2112larz2112 Posts: 286member
    dewme said:
    razorpit said:
    In the modern age of Bluetooth, why do Logitech's products still require users to tie-up one of their USB ports with a dongle? And why does no one bitch about that?

    The same people that complain about needing an HDMI dongle for their iPad are perfectly fine using a dongle for a wireless mouse and keyboard.
    Not an issue.

    You should check Logitech's web site.

    Almost all of their newer products including the vertical mouse mentioned in this article support Bluetooth. 

    As I read this I heard Gilda's voice in my head...

    SpamSandwichwelshdogcornchip
  • Reply 10 of 13
    dewmedewme Posts: 2,125member
    Can't somebody do a Kickstarter for a tilted stand for a Magic Trackpad?
    Depending on how tilted you want to go, a cedar shingle or wood shim may suffice. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 13
    welshdogwelshdog Posts: 1,694member
    One thing I found to be much better than a mouse and caused me no pain or discomfort was a Wacom tablet. Even the small 4x5 tablets eliminated all wrist discomfort I had developed from using a mouse. I have used pen and tablet devices for a very long time, beginning in 1987. I first operated an Ampex AVA video graphics system similar to a Quantel Paintbox.  It had a pen with a cable attached! later I used the actual Quantel Paintbox and it was wireless with a custom designed Wacom tablet (with Quantel branding). After that I used various Wacom tablets with Macs and every edit system we had used tablets for all control input other than keyboard. I did get in a situation where I was using a mouse on a Mac on a non-adjustable console/desk. Everything was at the wrong height and position. I started getting wrist and arm pain. Eventually I was able swap out the mouse for a small Wacom and the problems went away.

    I highly recommend if you are stuck using a mouse to try one of the small Wacoms. They don't take up much space and have a very short learning and adoption curve. They have some cool special features and allow really detailed control over the cursor. You won't be sorry.
  • Reply 12 of 13
    IreneWIreneW Posts: 164member
    razorpit said:
    In the modern age of Bluetooth, why do Logitech's products still require users to tie-up one of their USB ports with a dongle? And why does no one bitch about that?

    The same people that complain about needing an HDMI dongle for their iPad are perfectly fine using a dongle for a wireless mouse and keyboard.
    You didn't care to read the article?
  • Reply 13 of 13
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,991member
    Why do Logitech still include those receiver dongles?  I've got one for my mouse and one for my keyboard, but don't need them, do many people?  Seems wasteful shipping largely redundant accessories in every box.
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