Samsung's 'Infinity Flex Display' demo shows future of foldable smartphones

13

Comments

  • Reply 41 of 76
    DAalseth said:
    I like the concept. bu5t this is Android, and made by Samsung, so no. But I do like the concept. dewme said:
    I like the technology tremendously. A roll up high definition TV or monitor. Lots of wearable potential. If you made a full body suit from this flexible material and had multiple cameras on all sides could this not be used to form a cloaking device. Or maybe just upgrade your appearance. Full face video bag. Hmmm. Maybe something simpler, like window shades that always show a bright and sunny image on the inside regardless of the actual weather. 
    I agree with the idea of a roll up screen. A device with the screen the size of the XS-Max that would roll up into something the size of a cigar. Have to figure out the battery and circuit board arrangement, but I really like the idea.
    A rolled up screen could work (though your need a cylindrical case to protect it), but a truly foldable screen is going to damage itself before too long. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 42 of 76
    harrykatsarosharrykatsaros Posts: 13unconfirmed, member
    What’s Samsung’s motivation for showing of a prototype like this?  What do they get out of it?

    The comments section of The Verge full of posts claiming Samsung is more innovative than Apple. Heck someone on MacRumors called this “bone crushing” innovation.
    Even if Apple had made this first, and for all we now maybe they already have seeing as how they hold years old patents for the design, they wouldn't be caught dead showing this to a worldwide audience at a press event.

    Can you imagine the shit that Apple would get from the media if they called this big press event to show off a proof of concept folding screen (seen before) but this time in a phone (after last week, also seen before).

    This is a tech that is clearly in its infancy.  It's an early prototype model that you use as a base to build from for future products. It belongs on a lab shelf not centre stage at a big press show. This is actually embarrassing. If Apple did things like this they would be skewered. For some reason, Samsung can call a big press event every time one of their labs farts out an idea and everybody applauds.  Imagine if Apple called a big press event at every stage along the original iPhone design process to show off the latest prototype for a product that might eventually one day go on sale. This is serious minor league garbage and shows the difference in philosophy between the companies and why Samsung can never be Apple no matter how hard they try or how great their REAL products are.
    ravnorodomrandominternetpersonwatto_cobraspheric
  • Reply 43 of 76
    dewmedewme Posts: 1,763member
    Rollup screen concepts have been floating around for well over a decade. LG demo'd a 65" version at CES 2018 in January. 

    It's very silly to assess a company's innovation prowess based on prototypes, proof of concept demos, and even patent disclosures. Innovation is more than invention and ideas. Innovation is all about actually delivering things that are valuable and transformative to people and societies. Inventions and ideas that do not deliver value are not innovative, they are simply nice ideas. Apple is an innovation machine but they are not alone.  One of the unsung heroes of Apple's innovation machine (and there are many others) is their industrial engineering teams. These are the folks that figure out how amazing designs and ideas can actually be built effectively, efficiently, and at scale. Most everything that Apple does seems to require massive scale. When Tim Cook & Co. get up on stage in September to show off the latest and greatest iPhones we simply assume that tens of millions of these new beauties are going to available to purchase within a few days or weeks. Making all that happen requires a tremendous amount of innovation at many levels and across many disciplines, none of which get explicitly mentioned during the keynote, and the industrial engineering teams are among the unmentioned.

    Science fiction very often provides stimulation that tickles the imagination of inventors. Who would have imagined the 2018 iPad Pro 12.9" showing up in a 1968 movie, but what do you know, there she be.


    edited November 8 mac_128randominternetpersonwatto_cobraspheric
    iu.jpeg 148.2K
  • Reply 44 of 76
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,263member
    LordeHawk said:
    mac_128 said:
    bluefire1 said:
    They’ve created an option that no one asked for or particularly wants. 
    Watch WESTWORLD. They use foldable devices to great advantage. You state "no one" wants this, yet there's a whole very popular TV series which demonstrates the use cases perfectly. Somebody clearly wants this, and there's clearly good reason for it as showcased by this series. I'm always astounded how some on these forums will completely discount an idea, just because Apple isn't demonstrating the concept first ... 
    No one’s discounting the idea, we’re discussing the limitations that prove this is simply vaporware.  It’s a stretch to imply that Samsung is demonstrating the concept first, because plenty of prior art exists.  Samsung has done nothing unique, only showcased an incomplete concept that is not ready for the consumer.  At this point, there’s no indication that this Frankenstein device can effectively replicate  the original devices features and functions.  The aspect ratio is wrong for movies/TV, screen is small for desktop class applications, and dropping it will destroy it, but at least they can use it as a prop in Westworld...

    For decades, exotic concepts like these have captured our imaginations, by solving problems that we perceived in those moments.  At our current intersection of the internet, artificial intelligence, augmented reality and advanced mobile processors & sensors, we can leave the humble screen behind.  Like phonographs, records, tapes, and CDs before, we’ve assimilated and transcended these static mediums.  A paradigm shift in technology, it’s application, and the way it fundamentally changes humanity.  Consumer AR devices are expected in 2020, allowing screens to be any size, shape, form, placed anywhere, and allow infinite collaboration & interaction.

    I suppose an average person might mistaken Samsung for innovating, by demonstrating a half baked concept that’s been around for decades.  Perhaps I will get lucky, and Samsung will demonstrate the ability to manufacture something that’s not a POS.  Until then, I will keep coaxing along my failing 18 month old Samsung washer, dryer, fridge, and big screen.
    Yeah, I’d say the OP is discounting the idea, and that’s what I’m responding to, whatever issues you’re discussing otherwise. 

    As far as what you’re discussing, this device Samsung demonstrated is totally impractical, it’s thicker than a turkey club sandwich which solves no problems for me anyway.

    I dont disagree with anything you state, except for someone to say “they’ve created an option that no one asked for or particularly wants” is clearly discounting the idea, regardless of when it was first conceived or demonstrated.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 45 of 76
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,263member
    Rayz2016 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    bluefire1 said:
    They’ve created an option that no one asked for or particularly wants. 
    Watch WESTWORLD. They use foldable devices to great advantage. You state "no one" wants this, yet there's a whole very popular TV series which demonstrates the use cases perfectly. Somebody clearly wants this, and there's clearly good reason for it as showcased by this series. I'm always astounded how some on these forums will completely discount an idea, just because Apple isn't demonstrating the concept first ... 
    Your argument is that if Hollywood does it then it's a great idea for users?

    When you watch '24' you don't understand that hacking gov't servers doesn't begin and with telling someone to opening a new socket on a port, right?

    How about when someone on CSI tells someone to repeatedly enhance the image which miraculously makes a shitty image into a very clear one?



    You honestly can't think of a single reason why a transparent display has drawbacks or why it's not the future of display technology?


    Nex week, Samsung will be announcing that the new phone will be powered by Unobtainium. 
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    edited November 8
  • Reply 46 of 76
    bluefire1 said:
    They’ve created an option that no one asked for or particularly wants. 
    A solution to a problem that does not exist.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 47 of 76
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,384member
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    edited November 8 StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 48 of 76
    avon b7 said:
    Looks like they're answering the "how?" without first answering the "why?". This is one of the things Apple competitors and pundits struggle to grasp. Throwing a bunch of "how" against the wall will never compete will a well-thought-out "why".


    You didn't get the why?

    Making your mini tablet occupy half the screen space and turning it into a phone or vice versa.

    The 'why' is crystal clear. I currently use an iPad Mini 2 and a smartphone. This solution, somewhere down the road, would serve both uses on one device and have a screen protector built in for the tablet.

    Or course, pricing, weight and battery life will be important obstacles to overcome. And durability of course.
    Get real man. Your cheerleading of everything not-Apple is transparent and pathetic.

    This is a tech that does not yet have a Why? It's not even a real product, and they're banging a drum just to stay relevant in the media's eye. 
    tmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 49 of 76

    mac_128 said:
    bluefire1 said:
    They’ve created an option that no one asked for or particularly wants. 
    Watch WESTWORLD. They use foldable devices to great advantage. You state "no one" wants this, yet there's a whole very popular TV series which demonstrates the use cases perfectly. Somebody clearly wants this, and there's clearly good reason for it as showcased by this series. I'm always astounded how some on these forums will completely discount an idea, just because Apple isn't demonstrating the concept first ... 
    Apple doesn't demonstrate tech demos, it demonstrates products (yes, even AirPower is a committed pipeline product despite whatever delays have been incurred since revealing it...which is a reminder why they dont usually do that. Doubt they will again).

    Tech demos unattached to products are for the desperate.  
    watto_cobraspheric
  • Reply 50 of 76
    What’s Samsung’s motivation for showing of a prototype like this?  What do they get out of it?

    The comments section of The Verge full of posts claiming Samsung is more innovative than Apple. Heck someone on MacRumors called this “bone crushing” innovation.
    Thats exactly it. Tech demos like this only exist for PR.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 51 of 76

    Fatman said:
    Kudos to Samsung for thinking outside of the (rounded rectangle) box - even though it has a ways to go and borrows from the clamshell / flip phone / game boy designs of the past. At least it’s an attempt to solve the need for displaying more content while keeping the device conveniently portable - the increasing size of phablets is becoming a bit absurd. Will Apple counter with a design or be a fast follower if it succeeds in the market?
    The better question - Will you continue to troll Apple here in either case? You betcha!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 52 of 76
    dewme said:
    Rollup screen concepts have been floating around for well over a decade. LG demo'd a 65" version at CES 2018 in January. 

    It's very silly to assess a company's innovation prowess based on prototypes, proof of concept demos, and even patent disclosures. Innovation is more than invention and ideas. Innovation is all about actually delivering things that are valuable and transformative to people and societies. Inventions and ideas that do not deliver value are not innovative, they are simply nice ideas. Apple is an innovation machine but they are not alone.  One of the unsung heroes of Apple's innovation machine (and there are many others) is their industrial engineering teams. These are the folks that figure out how amazing designs and ideas can actually be built effectively, efficiently, and at scale. Most everything that Apple does seems to require massive scale. When Tim Cook & Co. get up on stage in September to show off the latest and greatest iPhones we simply assume that tens of millions of these new beauties are going to available to purchase within a few days or weeks. Making all that happen requires a tremendous amount of innovation at many levels and across many disciplines, none of which get explicitly mentioned during the keynote, and the industrial engineering teams are among the unmentioned.

    Science fiction very often provides stimulation that tickles the imagination of inventors. Who would have imagined the 2018 iPad Pro 12.9" showing up in a 1968 movie, but what do you know, there she be.


    Well said.

    And now we know why Apple is moving to FaceID from TouchID.  FaceID is spacesuit friendly, fingerprint readers are not.
    mac_128watto_cobrasphericStrangeDays
  • Reply 53 of 76
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,263member
    dewme said:
    Rollup screen concepts have been floating around for well over a decade. LG demo'd a 65" version at CES 2018 in January. 

    It's very silly to assess a company's innovation prowess based on prototypes, proof of concept demos, and even patent disclosures. Innovation is more than invention and ideas. Innovation is all about actually delivering things that are valuable and transformative to people and societies. Inventions and ideas that do not deliver value are not innovative, they are simply nice ideas. Apple is an innovation machine but they are not alone.  One of the unsung heroes of Apple's innovation machine (and there are many others) is their industrial engineering teams. These are the folks that figure out how amazing designs and ideas can actually be built effectively, efficiently, and at scale. Most everything that Apple does seems to require massive scale. When Tim Cook & Co. get up on stage in September to show off the latest and greatest iPhones we simply assume that tens of millions of these new beauties are going to available to purchase within a few days or weeks. Making all that happen requires a tremendous amount of innovation at many levels and across many disciplines, none of which get explicitly mentioned during the keynote, and the industrial engineering teams are among the unmentioned.

    Science fiction very often provides stimulation that tickles the imagination of inventors. Who would have imagined the 2018 iPad Pro 12.9" showing up in a 1968 movie, but what do you know, there she be.


    Well said.

    And now we know why Apple is moving to FaceID from TouchID.  FaceID is spacesuit friendly, fingerprint readers are not.
    Exactly!

    Except, unlike some strawman arguments being made around here about how transparent screens shown on TV, which look cool but aren't practical; 2001 showed the devices being used in a pragmatic way that demonstrated their effectiveness.  It's the execution of a particular use, in a particular production (which also happens to look cool on screen), that proves the effectiveness of a device in a pragmatic way. 
    edited November 8 spheric
  • Reply 54 of 76
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 2,790member
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    muthuk_vanalingamspheric
  • Reply 55 of 76
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,208member
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    You appear unaware that Samsung Electronics is in fact a world leader in mobile screen technology, and Huawei does not design, engineer, or manufacturer screens, Huawei going on record that they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones is completely dependent on availability of a screen from a manufacturer like Samsung.

    You might want cool the rhetoric in this case, as you appear a fool.

    watto_cobraStrangeDays
  • Reply 56 of 76
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 2,790member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    You appear unaware that Samsung Electronics is in fact a world leader in mobile screen technology, and Huawei does not design, engineer, or manufacturer screens, Huawei going on record that they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones is completely dependent on availability of a screen from a manufacturer like Samsung.

    You might want cool the rhetoric in this case, as you appear a fool.

    What does that have to do with anything?

    Let me spell it out for you: nothing.

    We already know that Huawe's proposal will not involve Samsung. Rumours point to a Chinese vendor.

    The whole real point is this:

    Samsung will announce the S10 around MWC.

    If the demoed screen were anywhere near that release frame, Samsung wouldn't have demoed it at all. They would have held it back for higher impact on release. There will be no major flagships released before the S10. There is no threat of any major player one upping them before the S10.

    So why did they demo it?

    They probably suspect a major player could get a foldable phone out before them. With Huawei going on record as saying their foldable screen phone will ship next year, the best option was to reveal what they have and then probably begin 'teasing' the product next year.

    Now, your stating-the-obvious claim that Huawei doesn't make it's own screens has no bearing on ANYTHING. 

    I really doubt Samsung would let a major competitor debut its folding screen technology. LOL. So, as Huawei doesn't make its own screens (thank you for pointing out what we all know!) and they say they will ship a phone with a folding screen in 2019 it will have to be from a different vendor - which is what rumours have pointed to from the start.

    And you speak of fools!?

    And don't forget. Everything I stated about Samsung at the top of the thread is applicable to Huawei too (and LG, Sony and Apple) but the industry being like it is, whoever brings a workable and compelling solution to market first, will score very high in mindset.




    muthuk_vanalingamspheric
  • Reply 57 of 76
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,208member
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    You appear unaware that Samsung Electronics is in fact a world leader in mobile screen technology, and Huawei does not design, engineer, or manufacturer screens, Huawei going on record that they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones is completely dependent on availability of a screen from a manufacturer like Samsung.

    You might want cool the rhetoric in this case, as you appear a fool.

    What does that have to do with anything?

    Let me spell it out for you: nothing.

    We already know that Huawe's proposal will not involve Samsung. Rumours point to a Chinese vendor.

    The whole real point is this:

    Samsung will announce the S10 around MWC.

    If the demoed screen were anywhere near that release frame, Samsung wouldn't have demoed it at all. They would have held it back for higher impact on release. There will be no major flagships released before the S10. There is no threat of any major player one upping them before the S10.

    So why did they demo it?

    They probably suspect a major player could get a foldable phone out before them. With Huawei going on record as saying their foldable screen phone will ship next year, the best option was to reveal what they have and then probably begin 'teasing' the product next year.

    Now, your stating-the-obvious claim that Huawei doesn't make it's own screens has no bearing on ANYTHING. 

    I really doubt Samsung would let a major competitor debut its folding screen technology. LOL. So, as Huawei doesn't make its own screens (thank you for pointing out what we all know!) and they say they will ship a phone with a folding screen in 2019 it will have to be from a different vendor - which is what rumours have pointed to from the start.

    And you speak of fools!?

    And don't forget. Everything I stated about Samsung at the top of the thread is applicable to Huawei too (and LG, Sony and Apple) but the industry being like it is, whoever brings a workable and compelling solution to market first, will score very high in mindset.




    Nobody is going to have a "working and compelling" folding screen phone in 2019. At best they will be curiosities with significant limitations, no matter the vendor.

    Here's the Verge story;

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/11/8/18074838/samsung-foldable-phone-infinity-flex-display-technology-report

    And something relevant to China's technology companies;

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/china-violated-obama-era-cybertheft-pact-u-s-official-says-1541716952


    edited November 8 watto_cobraStrangeDays
  • Reply 58 of 76
    As many sites have reported, the screen isn’t very bright and they showed it in dim lighting. I wonder why?

    I’m absolutely convinced you’ll be able to see the fold, which I think will piss people off. I’m also convinced it will feel “flimsy”. Two things people won’t accept in an expensive device. 
    The exterior lighting was dimmed to prevent the public and competitors from seeing the actual design of the phone inside. Yes, the actual phone is incased in a mule. Just like how new cars are disguised before launch when under going performance tests on the tracks. 
  • Reply 59 of 76
    What’s Samsung’s motivation for showing of a prototype like this?  What do they get out of it?
    Samsung Electronics is both a mobile phone maker and a display maker, at the same time. With its display maker hat on, they were showing off the protoype to its software developers so that they can make software adopt to the new form factor ahead of the hardware launch next year. That is why they got Google on board with the technology to support it from the OS level and on up. More people will demand this phone and screens like it if there is demand and supply of software to match it. Once other competitors see demand for foldable phones, they will want access to Samsung's foldable screens. Which would increase sales, and thus repeat the whole cycle again. Win- win for both their display division and their phone division. Either way, its a vicious circle and one that is quite hard to break. A brilliant business strategy. 

    This is a case where the hardware is leading the software evolution. Samsung is the biggest influencer in the Android space. Whatever they say matters. So basically Google saw what Samsung was seeing and partnered up. 
    edited November 8
  • Reply 60 of 76
    bluefire1 said:
    They’ve created an option that no one asked for or particularly wants. 
    I would disagree. The current trend of people wanting more screen real estate on their phones without having to sacrifice portability is clearly evident in the marketplace.  
    This trend was first started by Samsung themselves with the introducition of the first Galaxy Note 1. Many people laughed at it for having a gigantic screen and thick bezels and even a pen. Fast forward to 2018, its one of their best selling phones. Now, even competitors are adopting the same strategy of having large screens on their phones. The "phablet" sized screens are now the norm. 


    muthuk_vanalingam
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