Samsung's 'Infinity Flex Display' demo shows future of foldable smartphones

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Comments

  • Reply 61 of 76
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    You appear unaware that Samsung Electronics is in fact a world leader in mobile screen technology, and Huawei does not design, engineer, or manufacturer screens, Huawei going on record that they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones is completely dependent on availability of a screen from a manufacturer like Samsung.

    You might want cool the rhetoric in this case, as you appear a fool.

    What does that have to do with anything?

    Let me spell it out for you: nothing.

    We already know that Huawe's proposal will not involve Samsung. Rumours point to a Chinese vendor.

    The whole real point is this:

    Samsung will announce the S10 around MWC.

    If the demoed screen were anywhere near that release frame, Samsung wouldn't have demoed it at all. They would have held it back for higher impact on release. There will be no major flagships released before the S10. There is no threat of any major player one upping them before the S10.

    So why did they demo it?

    They probably suspect a major player could get a foldable phone out before them. With Huawei going on record as saying their foldable screen phone will ship next year, the best option was to reveal what they have and then probably begin 'teasing' the product next year.

    Now, your stating-the-obvious claim that Huawei doesn't make it's own screens has no bearing on ANYTHING. 

    I really doubt Samsung would let a major competitor debut its folding screen technology. LOL. So, as Huawei doesn't make its own screens (thank you for pointing out what we all know!) and they say they will ship a phone with a folding screen in 2019 it will have to be from a different vendor - which is what rumours have pointed to from the start.

    And you speak of fools!?

    And don't forget. Everything I stated about Samsung at the top of the thread is applicable to Huawei too (and LG, Sony and Apple) but the industry being like it is, whoever brings a workable and compelling solution to market first, will score very high in mindset.




    Samsung announced it at their developer conference of which the majority are software developers. It's the perfect place to showcase the technology and give a preview of what to expect in the coming months. What makes it even more conclusive is the fact that Google came out and officially supported the new form factor from the OS level. This release was to showcase that they have a working prototype and a close-to-market product in their pipeline to get developer support and interest. When the actual phone launchs, Samsung would want third party software that supports it at launch. To get that support you need time. Giving the developers around 6 months time period before the official launch (most likely at MWC 2019) would be a wise business decision. 

    Your statement about Huawei launching a foldable phone next year rests on the fact that Samsung will most likely be the supplier of said screens. I'm pretty sure Samsung has sent samples of the foldable screens to their customers to adopt to make the ecosystem of foldable phones expand to make its viable sector. Now why would Samsung give out these screens to their competitors? Your forgetting that Samsung is both a display maker and a mobile phone maker, at the same time. They currently ship their OLED screens to their competitors as their mobile division is using it at the same time.  Its a win-win scenario for them. 
    edited November 8 tmay
  • Reply 62 of 76
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 3,920member
    Pure gimmick, not practical. That’s all I can say. I don’t believe this will ever make to the production.
    edited November 8 watto_cobra
  • Reply 63 of 76
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,342member
    fallenjt said:
    Pure gimmick, not practical. That’s all I can say. I don’t believe this will ever make to the production.
    Oh, I think it’ll make it to production. I also think only geeks will buy it. 
    edited November 9 watto_cobratmay
  • Reply 64 of 76
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 2,787member
    avon b7 said:
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    You appear unaware that Samsung Electronics is in fact a world leader in mobile screen technology, and Huawei does not design, engineer, or manufacturer screens, Huawei going on record that they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones is completely dependent on availability of a screen from a manufacturer like Samsung.

    You might want cool the rhetoric in this case, as you appear a fool.

    What does that have to do with anything?

    Let me spell it out for you: nothing.

    We already know that Huawe's proposal will not involve Samsung. Rumours point to a Chinese vendor.

    The whole real point is this:

    Samsung will announce the S10 around MWC.

    If the demoed screen were anywhere near that release frame, Samsung wouldn't have demoed it at all. They would have held it back for higher impact on release. There will be no major flagships released before the S10. There is no threat of any major player one upping them before the S10.

    So why did they demo it?

    They probably suspect a major player could get a foldable phone out before them. With Huawei going on record as saying their foldable screen phone will ship next year, the best option was to reveal what they have and then probably begin 'teasing' the product next year.

    Now, your stating-the-obvious claim that Huawei doesn't make it's own screens has no bearing on ANYTHING. 

    I really doubt Samsung would let a major competitor debut its folding screen technology. LOL. So, as Huawei doesn't make its own screens (thank you for pointing out what we all know!) and they say they will ship a phone with a folding screen in 2019 it will have to be from a different vendor - which is what rumours have pointed to from the start.

    And you speak of fools!?

    And don't forget. Everything I stated about Samsung at the top of the thread is applicable to Huawei too (and LG, Sony and Apple) but the industry being like it is, whoever brings a workable and compelling solution to market first, will score very high in mindset.




    Samsung announced it at their developer conference of which the majority are software developers. It's the perfect place to showcase the technology and give a preview of what to expect in the coming months. What makes it even more conclusive is the fact that Google came out and officially supported the new form factor from the OS level. This release was to showcase that they have a working prototype and a close-to-market product in their pipeline to get developer support and interest. When the actual phone launchs, Samsung would want third party software that supports it at launch. To get that support you need time. Giving the developers around 6 months time period before the official launch (most likely at MWC 2019) would be a wise business decision. 

    Your statement about Huawei launching a foldable phone next year rests on the fact that Samsung will most likely be the supplier of said screens. I'm pretty sure Samsung has sent samples of the foldable screens to their customers to adopt to make the ecosystem of foldable phones expand to make its viable sector. Now why would Samsung give out these screens to their competitors? Your forgetting that Samsung is both a display maker and a mobile phone maker, at the same time. They currently ship their OLED screens to their competitors as their mobile division is using it at the same time.  Its a win-win scenario for them. 
    I think Samsung will reserve access to these panels to itself at launch for strategic reasons rather than economic reasons.

    For Huawei, rumours point to BOE or LG as potential suppliers.
  • Reply 65 of 76
    sphericspheric Posts: 1,667member
    What’s Samsung’s motivation for showing of a prototype like this?  What do they get out of it?
    “First!”

    “look at me! I’m first!”

    whether they actually are or not. 

    Thats their whole marketing strategy. 

    Where Apple prefers to ship something and let you become convinced by how great it is, Samsung tells you way in advance how great their vaporware is, whether it actually ends up being what they said or not. 
    This is it. 

    It’s ridiculous to think that Apple doesn’t have similar prototypes in their R&D vault. 

    The difference is that Apple will never tell you about them until they’ve built a product you will want. And they’ll let you know why you want it. 

    As long as they don’t have a plausible scenario to sell you a device that is currently more bulky than an old Nokia Communicator, they’re not going to. 

    The original iPhone was massive, it had comparatively (to the phones at the time) terrible battery life, but the experience was obviously what everybody wanted. No questions. 

    The iPad was introduced by Steve Jobs sitting in an armchair. That was the scenario. It was only one of what turned out to be many appealing scenarios, but that was the initial sell. It was of limited appeal, which is why there was so much skepticism at first. I wasn’t convinced either, until I bought a cheap iPad 2 and started testing it onstage (on my third iPad now, and I can’t imagine ever going back to paper).  

    Samsung’s sell here was literally “when it’s open — it’s a tablet. When it’s closed — it’s a phone that fits neatly in your pocket.” That’s it. 
    They’ll sell literally dozens!
    edited November 9 tmay
  • Reply 66 of 76
    sphericspheric Posts: 1,667member
    mac_128 said:
    dewme said:
    Rollup screen concepts have been floating around for well over a decade. LG demo'd a 65" version at CES 2018 in January. 

    It's very silly to assess a company's innovation prowess based on prototypes, proof of concept demos, and even patent disclosures. Innovation is more than invention and ideas. Innovation is all about actually delivering things that are valuable and transformative to people and societies. Inventions and ideas that do not deliver value are not innovative, they are simply nice ideas. Apple is an innovation machine but they are not alone.  One of the unsung heroes of Apple's innovation machine (and there are many others) is their industrial engineering teams. These are the folks that figure out how amazing designs and ideas can actually be built effectively, efficiently, and at scale. Most everything that Apple does seems to require massive scale. When Tim Cook & Co. get up on stage in September to show off the latest and greatest iPhones we simply assume that tens of millions of these new beauties are going to available to purchase within a few days or weeks. Making all that happen requires a tremendous amount of innovation at many levels and across many disciplines, none of which get explicitly mentioned during the keynote, and the industrial engineering teams are among the unmentioned.

    Science fiction very often provides stimulation that tickles the imagination of inventors. Who would have imagined the 2018 iPad Pro 12.9" showing up in a 1968 movie, but what do you know, there she be.


    Well said.

    And now we know why Apple is moving to FaceID from TouchID.  FaceID is spacesuit friendly, fingerprint readers are not.
    Exactly!

    Except, unlike some strawman arguments being made around here about how transparent screens shown on TV, which look cool but aren't practical; 2001 showed the devices being used in a pragmatic way that demonstrated their effectiveness.  It's the execution of a particular use, in a particular production (which also happens to look cool on screen), that proves the effectiveness of a device in a pragmatic way. 
    Note that that poster depicts a scene that never happened in the movie. 

    The only use of those tablets in the movie was in scenes where they were lying flat on tabletops (and they could use rear projection for the images). 



    (I still think it’s hilarious that Samsung cited Kubrick’s film as “prior art” in their design patent defense.)
    tmaySoli
  • Reply 67 of 76
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    No, they didn't. Apple previewed an *actual product*, one that was well in the product pipeline, had a finished design, working units at the event, etc. What Samsung did is half-show a raw, unfinished, working concept of a component of a product. That you're pretending they are similar is either proof of diminished reasoning abilities, or proof that you will move any and all goalposts to prop up your BS agenda.

    No, the product is *always* what's important. You don't feel this way, of course, because your employers or whatever can't think of their own products and instead ripoff whatever Apple is doing.


    edited November 9 tmay
  • Reply 68 of 76
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,208member
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    No, they didn't. Apple previewed an *actual product*, one that was well in the product pipeline, had a finished design, working units at the event, etc. What Samsung did is half-show a raw, unfinished, working concept of a component of a product. That you're pretending they are similar is either proof of diminished reasoning abilities, or proof that you will move any and all goalposts to prop up your BS agenda.

    No, the product is *always* what's important. You don't feel this way, of course, because your employers or whatever can't think of their own products and instead ripoff whatever Apple is doing.


    I completely agree with you.

    HomePod was finished Hardware, being field tested by Apple employees in their homes, while the software was being ironed out.

    Funny thing is that Avon B7 is such a fanboy of Huawei, that I almost felt sorry for him being busted by that new Samsung guy posting today on this thread.


    Avon B7, from a earlier post in this thread;

    "You didn't get the why?

    Making your mini tablet occupy half the screen space and turning it into a phone or vice versa.

    The 'why' is crystal clear. I currently use an iPad Mini 2 and a smartphone. This solution, somewhere down the road, would serve both uses on one device and have a screen protector built in for the tablet.

    Or course, pricing, weight and battery life will be important obstacles to overcome. And durability of course".


    Avon B7 might want to first consider either adopting an iPhone, so he is UI consistent with his iPad, or getting rid of the iPad for some POS Android OS tablet so he is consistent with his Huawei Honor 10 phone.

    Oh, and it's more than past time for Avon B7 to update his iPad and his wife'w iPhone 6 to iOS 12.1, which most people consider to be a solid, trouble free update.

    I'm thinking that Avon B7 is afraid the his wife might like the jump in performance of the iPhone 6 with iOS 12.1 so much that she might want to go for an Xr over some Huawei phone.
    edited November 9
  • Reply 69 of 76
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 2,787member
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    No, they didn't. Apple previewed an *actual product*, one that was well in the product pipeline, had a finished design, working units at the event, etc. What Samsung did is half-show a raw, unfinished, working concept of a component of a product. That you're pretending they are similar is either proof of diminished reasoning abilities, or proof that you will move any and all goalposts to prop up your BS agenda.

    No, the product is *always* what's important. You don't feel this way, of course, because your employers or whatever can't think of their own products and instead ripoff whatever Apple is doing.


    The HomePod presentation wasn't given because of the product itself. Apple needed to get a message out before Christmas.

    If it weren't for the message, the HomePod would never have been previewed in the first place. The product would have been announced when, and only when, it was ready.

    In the case of the HomePod, they had sent out messages that implied they were not into the smartspeaker market.

    Amazon and Google (among others) were gearing up to continue their success in that space and Apple took the (uncommon) decision to pre-announce HomePod. A category that had a long history and was getting 'smarter'.

    Samsung is doing the same IMO. Sending a message, but on the product side there is a massive difference: this is a completely NEW category and Samsung doesn't want to give competitors ANY product information beyond the screen itself and how to design software for it. That is understandable.





  • Reply 70 of 76
    sphericspheric Posts: 1,667member
    I agree, but the question is: why did Samsung announce it at all? 

    The category doesn’t exist yet, except in one other product pre-announcement. 

    Is it just their usual tactic of pre-empting in hopes that people will wait for their product rather than buy one of the available working options? 
  • Reply 71 of 76
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,208member
    spheric said:
    I agree, but the question is: why did Samsung announce it at all? 

    The category doesn’t exist yet, except in one other product pre-announcement. 

    Is it just their usual tactic of pre-empting in hopes that people will wait for their product rather than buy one of the available working options? 
    The Android OS device market requires that manufacturers provide product differentiations to drive sales; otherwise, they ultimately compete on pricing.

    Samsung has the technical drivers to create a few differentiations, and in this case, folding screens, they want to gain the halo effect of announcing early, and delivering before their Chinese competitors like Huawei do. I give them an edge for both screen manufacturing, and their Exynos 9820, which should come in just under the A12 for performance, besting the Kirin 980, based on Samsung's 4th generation m4 microarchitecture.

    https://wccftech.com/samsung-teases-the-arrival-of-a-brand-new-exynos-soc-for-november-14-on-its-twitter-account-is-it-the-exynos-9820/

    Apple doesn't have to play this game, giving more latitude to an internal roadmap of innovation and feature release.
    edited November 9 StrangeDays
  • Reply 72 of 76
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    No, they didn't. Apple previewed an *actual product*, one that was well in the product pipeline, had a finished design, working units at the event, etc. What Samsung did is half-show a raw, unfinished, working concept of a component of a product. That you're pretending they are similar is either proof of diminished reasoning abilities, or proof that you will move any and all goalposts to prop up your BS agenda.

    No, the product is *always* what's important. You don't feel this way, of course, because your employers or whatever can't think of their own products and instead ripoff whatever Apple is doing.


    The HomePod presentation wasn't given because of the product itself. Apple needed to get a message out before Christmas.

    If it weren't for the message, the HomePod would never have been previewed in the first place. The product would have been announced when, and only when, it was ready.

    In the case of the HomePod, they had sent out messages that implied they were not into the smartspeaker market.

    Amazon and Google (among others) were gearing up to continue their success in that space and Apple took the (uncommon) decision to pre-announce HomePod. A category that had a long history and was getting 'smarter'.

    Samsung is doing the same IMO. Sending a message, but on the product side there is a massive difference: this is a completely NEW category and Samsung doesn't want to give competitors ANY product information beyond the screen itself and how to design software for it. That is understandable.
    Again, since you willfully ignore the difference — HomePod was a near-finished product. This is a tech demo of a component that may be sold to someone building a product one day, maybe. 

    There is no “why”, there is only a “how”. 
    edited November 10 Soli
  • Reply 73 of 76
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,380member
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    No, they didn't. Apple previewed an *actual product*, one that was well in the product pipeline, had a finished design, working units at the event, etc. What Samsung did is half-show a raw, unfinished, working concept of a component of a product. That you're pretending they are similar is either proof of diminished reasoning abilities, or proof that you will move any and all goalposts to prop up your BS agenda.

    No, the product is *always* what's important. You don't feel this way, of course, because your employers or whatever can't think of their own products and instead ripoff whatever Apple is doing.


    The HomePod presentation wasn't given because of the product itself. Apple needed to get a message out before Christmas.

    If it weren't for the message, the HomePod would never have been previewed in the first place. The product would have been announced when, and only when, it was ready.

    In the case of the HomePod, they had sent out messages that implied they were not into the smartspeaker market.

    Amazon and Google (among others) were gearing up to continue their success in that space and Apple took the (uncommon) decision to pre-announce HomePod. A category that had a long history and was getting 'smarter'.

    Samsung is doing the same IMO. Sending a message, but on the product side there is a massive difference: this is a completely NEW category and Samsung doesn't want to give competitors ANY product information beyond the screen itself and how to design software for it. That is understandable.
    Again, since you willfully ignore the difference — HomePod was a near-finished product. This is a tech demo of a component that may be sold to someone building a product one day, maybe. 

    There is no “why”, there is only a “how”. 
    Let's remember this is a guy that repeatedly posts mocked up images from companies that say they'll be releasing something at an unknown price an unknown future date without anything even close to being ready for a live demo in a ridiculous attempt to prove how much Apple sucks. Remember when Apple was a big loser for not pre-announcing an iPhone with a 7nm SoC just to have Apple beat everyone to market with 10s of millions of their in-house designed chips (which includes their own core design) that were actually in user's hands while he was saying how great Huawei was for making a big stink about nothing?
    edited November 10 tmay
  • Reply 74 of 76
    nhtnht Posts: 4,302member
    I'm surprised that we haven't seen this (maybe we have and I missed it).




    I don't need this on my phone...but on a laptop or maybe an iPad?  Yes, that would be nice.

    Siri isn't quite up to this...yet.
    edited November 10
  • Reply 75 of 76
    SoliSoli Posts: 8,380member
    nht said:
    I'm surprised that we haven't seen this (maybe we have and I missed it).

    [animated GIF]
    [link]

    I don't need this on my phone...but on a laptop or maybe an iPad?  Yes, that would be nice.

    Siri isn't quite up to this...yet.
    It's funny how expectations change. If the magnetic cover for the iPad enabled the display that slowly it would be a failure, but I doubt anyone thought anything about it back in the 80s as it lit up with the same pleasant flow as an incandescent light bulb.
    edited November 10
  • Reply 76 of 76
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 2,787member
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    Soli said:
    mac_128 said:
    Ah the strawman arguments begin.

     But if someone actually made that argument, yours is a very clever retort. ;-)
    Your "I've seen it on TV so it must make sense" argument is the straw man. That's why your comment is being made fun of. If you had a real argument as to how the state-of-the-art for 2018 will allow for a display, touch element and protective covering (and potentially a digitizer) to last well past typical usage without showing any signs of wear-and-tear, and how this is filling a market void that wasn't possible before now you would've mentioned it—you certainly wouldn't have said it works perfectly fine on Westworld.

    We see this same ol' shit from the same people who get all goggly eyed at some new technology without weighing its pros and cons, or its long development cycle.. TV panels are a classic example of this happening over and over and over again.

    Also, consider how long it took after OLED was invented, and then how long after OLED panels were being sold, and then how long before OLED panels were being mass marketed (mostly via Samsung since they had such a major investment in it) in smartphones before Apple jumped into the fray in 2017.

    Do you understand why they waited that long to add it to their flagship device? Do you understand why the Apple Watch had OLED out of the gate with its UI designed around maximizing blacks? Do you understand why Apple's OLED displays, even though sourced from Samsung, are much better than the average OLED display on a smartphone?

    If you do understand all that then I can't fathom why you're jumping in head first before of a very, very unfinished demo of skunkswork project that Samsung just had to do a "me too" release because some unknown company called Royole announced something called FlexPai.

    tl;dr: Slow your roll fold, Mac.
    Well, 2018 is drawing to a close but for 2019, Huawei has already gone on record as saying they will have a folding screen shipping on one of its phones.

    Samsung probably wanted to get the announcement and demo out to say 'whatever appears in the coming months, don't forget we will also have a folding option too'.

    Apple did something similar with the HomePod. 

    At this point, what is important is the message, not the product.
    No, they didn't. Apple previewed an *actual product*, one that was well in the product pipeline, had a finished design, working units at the event, etc. What Samsung did is half-show a raw, unfinished, working concept of a component of a product. That you're pretending they are similar is either proof of diminished reasoning abilities, or proof that you will move any and all goalposts to prop up your BS agenda.

    No, the product is *always* what's important. You don't feel this way, of course, because your employers or whatever can't think of their own products and instead ripoff whatever Apple is doing.


    The HomePod presentation wasn't given because of the product itself. Apple needed to get a message out before Christmas.

    If it weren't for the message, the HomePod would never have been previewed in the first place. The product would have been announced when, and only when, it was ready.

    In the case of the HomePod, they had sent out messages that implied they were not into the smartspeaker market.

    Amazon and Google (among others) were gearing up to continue their success in that space and Apple took the (uncommon) decision to pre-announce HomePod. A category that had a long history and was getting 'smarter'.

    Samsung is doing the same IMO. Sending a message, but on the product side there is a massive difference: this is a completely NEW category and Samsung doesn't want to give competitors ANY product information beyond the screen itself and how to design software for it. That is understandable.
    Again, since you willfully ignore the difference — HomePod was a near-finished product. This is a tech demo of a component that may be sold to someone building a product one day, maybe. 

    There is no “why”, there is only a “how”. 
    Can you imagine why notebooks and notepads co-exist on the market?

    The 'why' is crystal clear.
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