Amazon confirms New York City and Northern Virginia for new $2.5 billion corporate headqua...

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 46
    Sheer stupidity. Let's move to two cramped, congested areas and compete for talent/space/housing. Were it me, I'd have went with Columbus OH, Bloomington/Normal IL, Memphis TN. Places that would value the investment, have room/roads/housing/universities and little competition for talent.
    randominternetpersondewme
  • Reply 22 of 46
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 5,043member
    5,000 jobs with an average salary of $150k in Nashville?  Wow. 

    Have you been to Nashville lately, I have been, traffic is horrendous there. The built this new highway years ago but over the last 5 yrs the growth has been so high it takes 45 minutes to go 10 miles. 

    Not sure what Amazon was thinking, put these new operations in places which there is so much traffic. yeah you are making lots but spend most of your free time in traffic. or you pay a fortune for housing so not to commute. in one case you have not time to spend the money in the other you have time but no money.

  • Reply 23 of 46
    Eric_WVGG said:
    The pick of "Long Island City" (Queens) instead of Manhattan or Brooklyn is a bit weird… and possibly a little savvy (I'm not sure).

    Manhattan would have been an instant crisis… if they had picked Brooklyn, whoomp, that's the end of Brooklyn. Instead they picked Queens, which… it's sort of a tacky area. Nobody wants to be there except folks who grew up there. But a ton of new high-rises just popped up in the past two years (I'm out there all the time as they're clustered around my gym.

    There's not (quite) enough of them to absorb 25,000 new workers, but it will be close — and Queens can contain the rest too. 
    long-time resident and worker in LIC, happy if this brings some more commercial activity as well as upgrades to infrastructure.
    citibank tower has a lot of vacant office space now that citibank is leaving.
    views of manhattan are quite nice. as is the entire waterfront.
    we used to be one of the last industrial areas in NYC, and the vibe lingers on .. i always loved it and still do.
    happy with this development!
  • Reply 24 of 46
    It was puzzling to me why they'd choose two new locations, not that far apart geographically, but the fact that they are building "where talent is" makes a lot of sense. 
  • Reply 25 of 46
    davgregdavgreg Posts: 1,031member
    I think the whole process was a ruse to squeeze incentives from the areas. NYC in particular gave away the store as they are desperate to steal tech jobs from the Left Coast and Massachusetts.

    Cannot fathom why anyone would rather live in DC or NYC than the Emerald City. They are both as expensive as Seattle with a much lower quality of life. As to Nashville, it voted down a public transit system and is a sprawling mess. Developers are tearing down whole neighborhoods to build bigger and more expensive homes.
  • Reply 26 of 46
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,697member
    And both are arriving, free of charge, on Thursday sometime before 8 p.m.
    randominternetpersonSpamSandwich
  • Reply 27 of 46
    5,000 jobs with an average salary of $150k in Nashville?  Wow. 
    Quite surprising if that’s the average. That’s higher than most non-coastal developers earn as salary.
  • Reply 28 of 46
    spice-boyspice-boy Posts: 1,450member
    The part of Long Island City (LIC) is nothing but bland, architecture free glass towers, the kind the first Matrix movie was filled with. Queens is a vibrant working class and immigrant borough and the good part of it will be ignored by Amazon's employees who will come to Manhattan to eat as Shake Shack or some equally dull corporate foodie joint. As a NYer I feared this announcement because it will mean more hyper-gentrification, more strain on an ignored and falling into ruins subway system. Rent hikes, more hideous chain stores to make Manhattan look like Kansas.The richest man in the world just bought my hometown and our lousy Mayor and Governor get all the credit. 
    ronn
  • Reply 29 of 46
    payecopayeco Posts: 580member
    GHammer said:
    Sheer stupidity. Let's move to two cramped, congested areas and compete for talent/space/housing. Were it me, I'd have went with Columbus OH, Bloomington/Normal IL, Memphis TN. Places that would value the investment, have room/roads/housing/universities and little competition for talent.
    maestro64 said:
    5,000 jobs with an average salary of $150k in Nashville?  Wow. 

    Have you been to Nashville lately, I have been, traffic is horrendous there. The built this new highway years ago but over the last 5 yrs the growth has been so high it takes 45 minutes to go 10 miles. 

    Not sure what Amazon was thinking, put these new operations in places which there is so much traffic. yeah you are making lots but spend most of your free time in traffic. or you pay a fortune for housing so not to commute. in one case you have not time to spend the money in the other you have time but no money.

    Public transportation was a key factor in Amazon’s decision. No where between the two coasts, besides Chicago, has any real public transpiration to speak of. Chicago was probably the only city outside of the northeast and the west coast that actually had a shot. Most cities between DC and Boston have extensive bus and subway and/or light rail, plus the cities are all linked by Amtrak. Additionally, New York has extensive commuter rail linking the city to all the suburbs in NY, CT and NJ.

    Amazon doesn’t want to build a massive campus in the middle of a field with 50k parking spaces for people driving a car into work everyday. Corporate America has been moving away from that mid 20th century era office model for the last decade or so and cities with good public transportation networks are poised to benefit from this shift. 
    JFC_PA
  • Reply 30 of 46
    petelobl said:
    Eric_WVGG said:
    ...
    long-time resident and worker in LIC, happy if this brings some more commercial activity as well as upgrades to infrastructure.
    Potential upside: Cuomo doesn't listen to citizens, but he has an ear for the wealthy. If Bezos demands that he fix the #^@^$ subway, Cuomo finally might.
    JFC_PA
  • Reply 31 of 46
    payecopayeco Posts: 580member
    Folio said:
    Yeah traffic is a beast. But at least Crystal City “National Landing” is served by subway lines getting upgraded. And the office space was largely vacated by defense contractors. NYC may be worse. The 7 train at rush hour one hellish commute.
    Presumably you’re going to have lots of people reverse commuting on the 7 though. I think lots of these new employees are going to end up living in Hudson Yards so they can hop on an empty 7 right at their doorstep and take one train to be let off right by their office.
  • Reply 32 of 46

    payeco said:
    GHammer said:
    Sheer stupidity. Let's move to two cramped, congested areas and compete for talent/space/housing. Were it me, I'd have went with Columbus OH, Bloomington/Normal IL, Memphis TN. Places that would value the investment, have room/roads/housing/universities and little competition for talent.
    maestro64 said:
    5,000 jobs with an average salary of $150k in Nashville?  Wow. 

    Have you been to Nashville lately, I have been, traffic is horrendous there. The built this new highway years ago but over the last 5 yrs the growth has been so high it takes 45 minutes to go 10 miles. 
    Public transportation was a key factor in Amazon’s decision. No where between the two coasts, besides Chicago, has any real public transpiration to speak of…
    Good bit about how the Koch brothers managed to kill a major public transit project in Nashville — https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/19/climate/koch-brothers-public-transit.html

    It's fun to see the midwest beg tech to bring jobs back to their cities on the one hand, and vote down anything that would make their cities desirable places to live on the other.
    ronn
  • Reply 33 of 46
    payecopayeco Posts: 580member
    Eric_WVGG said:

    payeco said:
    GHammer said:
    Sheer stupidity. Let's move to two cramped, congested areas and compete for talent/space/housing. Were it me, I'd have went with Columbus OH, Bloomington/Normal IL, Memphis TN. Places that would value the investment, have room/roads/housing/universities and little competition for talent.
    maestro64 said:
    5,000 jobs with an average salary of $150k in Nashville?  Wow. 

    Have you been to Nashville lately, I have been, traffic is horrendous there. The built this new highway years ago but over the last 5 yrs the growth has been so high it takes 45 minutes to go 10 miles. 
    Public transportation was a key factor in Amazon’s decision. No where between the two coasts, besides Chicago, has any real public transpiration to speak of…
    Good bit about how the Koch brothers managed to kill a major public transit project in Nashville — https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/19/climate/koch-brothers-public-transit.html

    It's fun to see the midwest beg tech to bring jobs back to their cities on the one hand, and vote down anything that would make their cities desirable places to live on the other.
    Yeah I read that. Shameful. Though I think people are finally starting to see what’s going on. The Koch brothers tried to do the same thing last week to a public transportation project in Tampa and the people of Tampa told them to take a hike.

    https://usa.streetsblog.org/2018/11/07/election-2018-the-koch-brothers-lost-big-in-tampa-last-night/
    edited November 2018
  • Reply 34 of 46
    dewmedewme Posts: 5,279member
    payeco said:
    GHammer said:
    Sheer stupidity. Let's move to two cramped, congested areas and compete for talent/space/housing. Were it me, I'd have went with Columbus OH, Bloomington/Normal IL, Memphis TN. Places that would value the investment, have room/roads/housing/universities and little competition for talent.
    maestro64 said:
    5,000 jobs with an average salary of $150k in Nashville?  Wow. 

    Have you been to Nashville lately, I have been, traffic is horrendous there. The built this new highway years ago but over the last 5 yrs the growth has been so high it takes 45 minutes to go 10 miles. 

    Not sure what Amazon was thinking, put these new operations in places which there is so much traffic. yeah you are making lots but spend most of your free time in traffic. or you pay a fortune for housing so not to commute. in one case you have not time to spend the money in the other you have time but no money.

    Public transportation was a key factor in Amazon’s decision. No where between the two coasts, besides Chicago, has any real public transpiration to speak of. Chicago was probably the only city outside of the northeast and the west coast that actually had a shot. Most cities between DC and Boston have extensive bus and subway and/or light rail, plus the cities are all linked by Amtrak. Additionally, New York has extensive commuter rail linking the city to all the suburbs in NY, CT and NJ.

    Amazon doesn’t want to build a massive campus in the middle of a field with 50k parking spaces for people driving a car into work everyday. Corporate America has been moving away from that mid 20th century era office model for the last decade or so and cities with good public transportation networks are poised to benefit from this shift. 
    As much as I’d like to say “yay” for Amazon rewarding cities that provide decent public transportation it would simply ring hollow. The very best American public transportation systems are cute little boutique projects compared to even mid level systems in Europe and Asia. I’ve long since thrown in the towel and accepted that no matter how abysmal the commutes are for so many Americans, not only in large metropolitan areas but even medium sized cities, Americans have cast their lot with the automobile and will cling to it even if they have to sleep in their cars because the commute time exceeds the time before they have to be back at their post. I’ve long admired the public transportation systems I’ve experienced inGermany, Switzerland, Belgium, Great Britain, Singapore, and Japan only to return to the USA and feel like I’m stepping back 50 years in transportation evolution. Yeah yeah, what’s good for GM is what’s good for America, I guess. Cough cough cough. At some point you simply have to concede that we gotten exactly what we deserve and Amazon can’t save us from ourselves. 
  • Reply 35 of 46
    payecopayeco Posts: 580member
    dewme said:
    payeco said:
    GHammer said:
    Sheer stupidity. Let's move to two cramped, congested areas and compete for talent/space/housing. Were it me, I'd have went with Columbus OH, Bloomington/Normal IL, Memphis TN. Places that would value the investment, have room/roads/housing/universities and little competition for talent.
    maestro64 said:
    5,000 jobs with an average salary of $150k in Nashville?  Wow. 

    Have you been to Nashville lately, I have been, traffic is horrendous there. The built this new highway years ago but over the last 5 yrs the growth has been so high it takes 45 minutes to go 10 miles. 

    Not sure what Amazon was thinking, put these new operations in places which there is so much traffic. yeah you are making lots but spend most of your free time in traffic. or you pay a fortune for housing so not to commute. in one case you have not time to spend the money in the other you have time but no money.

    Public transportation was a key factor in Amazon’s decision. No where between the two coasts, besides Chicago, has any real public transpiration to speak of. Chicago was probably the only city outside of the northeast and the west coast that actually had a shot. Most cities between DC and Boston have extensive bus and subway and/or light rail, plus the cities are all linked by Amtrak. Additionally, New York has extensive commuter rail linking the city to all the suburbs in NY, CT and NJ.

    Amazon doesn’t want to build a massive campus in the middle of a field with 50k parking spaces for people driving a car into work everyday. Corporate America has been moving away from that mid 20th century era office model for the last decade or so and cities with good public transportation networks are poised to benefit from this shift. 
    As much as I’d like to say “yay” for Amazon rewarding cities that provide decent public transportation it would simply ring hollow. The very best American public transportation systems are cute little boutique projects compared to even mid level systems in Europe and Asia. I’ve long since thrown in the towel and accepted that no matter how abysmal the commutes are for so many Americans, not only in large metropolitan areas but even medium sized cities, Americans have cast their lot with the automobile and will cling to it even if they have to sleep in their cars because the commute time exceeds the time before they have to be back at their post. I’ve long admired the public transportation systems I’ve experienced inGermany, Switzerland, Belgium, Great Britain, Singapore, and Japan only to return to the USA and feel like I’m stepping back 50 years in transportation evolution. Yeah yeah, what’s good for GM is what’s good for America, I guess. Cough cough cough. At some point you simply have to concede that we gotten exactly what we deserve and Amazon can’t save us from ourselves. 
    I’ve been to Europe and Asia too. Yes, I know they’re better. What is your point? Amazon wasn’t considering locations in Europe or Asia.

    Also, the public transportation for the NYC metro area is pretty world class. In addition to Amtrak, there are 4 different commuter railroads from the suburbs. It has an extensive bus network and ferry service. The New York City subway also has more stations than any subway system in the world.
    JFC_PA
  • Reply 36 of 46
    ronnronn Posts: 650member
    payeco said:
    I’ve been to Europe and Asia too. Yes, I know they’re better. What is your point? Amazon wasn’t considering locations in Europe or Asia.

    Also, the public transportation for the NYC metro area is pretty world class. In addition to Amtrak, there are 4 different commuter railroads from the suburbs. It has an extensive bus network and ferry service. The New York City subway also has more stations than any subway system in the world.
    Public Transportation for the NYC metro area is pretty garbage and in serious need of repair and upgrades, especially the subway system. Adding so many to one of the most congested lines makes no sense.
  • Reply 37 of 46
    payecopayeco Posts: 580member
    ronn said:
    payeco said:
    I’ve been to Europe and Asia too. Yes, I know they’re better. What is your point? Amazon wasn’t considering locations in Europe or Asia.

    Also, the public transportation for the NYC metro area is pretty world class. In addition to Amtrak, there are 4 different commuter railroads from the suburbs. It has an extensive bus network and ferry service. The New York City subway also has more stations than any subway system in the world.
    Public Transportation for the NYC metro area is pretty garbage and in serious need of repair and upgrades, especially the subway system. Adding so many to one of the most congested lines makes no sense.
    The trains and signals need to be upgraded, absolutely. However, the bones are already there though and that is the most expensive, difficult part to build of a public transportation network. And we don’t know how crowded the 7 is going to be because we don’t know where these employees are going to live. For all we know they’ll all live in Manhattan and Brooklyn and reverse commute on an empty 7 train and take the G which is operating below capacity. Also, once the CBTC upgrades are done on the 7 they’ll be able to add additional capacity.
  • Reply 38 of 46
    dewme said:
    payeco said:
    GHammer said:
    Sheer stupidity. Let's move to two cramped, congested areas and compete for talent/space/housing. Were it me, I'd have went with Columbus OH, Bloomington/Normal IL, Memphis TN. Places that would value the investment, have room/roads/housing/universities and little competition for talent.
    maestro64 said:
    5,000 jobs with an average salary of $150k in Nashville?  Wow. 

    Have you been to Nashville lately, I have been, traffic is horrendous there. The built this new highway years ago but over the last 5 yrs the growth has been so high it takes 45 minutes to go 10 miles. 

    Not sure what Amazon was thinking, put these new operations in places which there is so much traffic. yeah you are making lots but spend most of your free time in traffic. or you pay a fortune for housing so not to commute. in one case you have not time to spend the money in the other you have time but no money.

    Public transportation was a key factor in Amazon’s decision. No where between the two coasts, besides Chicago, has any real public transpiration to speak of. Chicago was probably the only city outside of the northeast and the west coast that actually had a shot. Most cities between DC and Boston have extensive bus and subway and/or light rail, plus the cities are all linked by Amtrak. Additionally, New York has extensive commuter rail linking the city to all the suburbs in NY, CT and NJ.

    Amazon doesn’t want to build a massive campus in the middle of a field with 50k parking spaces for people driving a car into work everyday. Corporate America has been moving away from that mid 20th century era office model for the last decade or so and cities with good public transportation networks are poised to benefit from this shift. 
    As much as I’d like to say “yay” for Amazon rewarding cities that provide decent public transportation it would simply ring hollow. The very best American public transportation systems are cute little boutique projects compared to even mid level systems in Europe and Asia. I’ve long since thrown in the towel and accepted that no matter how abysmal the commutes are for so many Americans, not only in large metropolitan areas but even medium sized cities, Americans have cast their lot with the automobile and will cling to it even if they have to sleep in their cars because the commute time exceeds the time before they have to be back at their post. I’ve long admired the public transportation systems I’ve experienced inGermany, Switzerland, Belgium, Great Britain, Singapore, and Japan only to return to the USA and feel like I’m stepping back 50 years in transportation evolution. Yeah yeah, what’s good for GM is what’s good for America, I guess. Cough cough cough. At some point you simply have to concede that we gotten exactly what we deserve and Amazon can’t save us from ourselves. 
    We don’t want or need huge public works projects which represent expansions of state power in America.
  • Reply 39 of 46
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,652member
    dewme said:
    Good for them ... I guess. Whew, it's not like the traffic, congestion, and cost of living isn't already brutal in both of those areas. Can it even get worse? I guess we will find out. Perhaps Amazon employees can same-day deliver themselves back and forth between home and office. 
    Can confirm that it is. Those millions that Virginia has promised won't even cover what we need now, much less when 25K Amazon folk move in.
    Why do people always assume that those jobs won't go to people already living in the area?  I would sincerely hope that at least 50% of the jobs are going to locals.  Ideally, almost all of them would be local which at the very least, would take pressure off of housing availability and prices.

    IMO, the biggest problem in Long Island City is transportation.   There's really only one subway station near where I think the Amazon location would be and it's already packed to the gills.

    25,000 jobs @ $100K each = $2.5 billion in salaries per year.  That's fantastic.   And if that's real, $120 million of tax credits per year over the next 10 is not a bad deal.  On the other hand, why is there $1.2 billion of funding available to Amazon, but there's little money to fix the subways?
  • Reply 40 of 46
    payecopayeco Posts: 580member
    dewme said:
    payeco said:
    GHammer said:
    Sheer stupidity. Let's move to two cramped, congested areas and compete for talent/space/housing. Were it me, I'd have went with Columbus OH, Bloomington/Normal IL, Memphis TN. Places that would value the investment, have room/roads/housing/universities and little competition for talent.
    maestro64 said:
    5,000 jobs with an average salary of $150k in Nashville?  Wow. 

    Have you been to Nashville lately, I have been, traffic is horrendous there. The built this new highway years ago but over the last 5 yrs the growth has been so high it takes 45 minutes to go 10 miles. 

    Not sure what Amazon was thinking, put these new operations in places which there is so much traffic. yeah you are making lots but spend most of your free time in traffic. or you pay a fortune for housing so not to commute. in one case you have not time to spend the money in the other you have time but no money.

    Public transportation was a key factor in Amazon’s decision. No where between the two coasts, besides Chicago, has any real public transpiration to speak of. Chicago was probably the only city outside of the northeast and the west coast that actually had a shot. Most cities between DC and Boston have extensive bus and subway and/or light rail, plus the cities are all linked by Amtrak. Additionally, New York has extensive commuter rail linking the city to all the suburbs in NY, CT and NJ.

    Amazon doesn’t want to build a massive campus in the middle of a field with 50k parking spaces for people driving a car into work everyday. Corporate America has been moving away from that mid 20th century era office model for the last decade or so and cities with good public transportation networks are poised to benefit from this shift. 
    As much as I’d like to say “yay” for Amazon rewarding cities that provide decent public transportation it would simply ring hollow. The very best American public transportation systems are cute little boutique projects compared to even mid level systems in Europe and Asia. I’ve long since thrown in the towel and accepted that no matter how abysmal the commutes are for so many Americans, not only in large metropolitan areas but even medium sized cities, Americans have cast their lot with the automobile and will cling to it even if they have to sleep in their cars because the commute time exceeds the time before they have to be back at their post. I’ve long admired the public transportation systems I’ve experienced inGermany, Switzerland, Belgium, Great Britain, Singapore, and Japan only to return to the USA and feel like I’m stepping back 50 years in transportation evolution. Yeah yeah, what’s good for GM is what’s good for America, I guess. Cough cough cough. At some point you simply have to concede that we gotten exactly what we deserve and Amazon can’t save us from ourselves. 
    We don’t want or need huge public works projects which represent expansions of state power in America.
    You’re absolutely right. We need to make sure all huge public works projects are for paved automobile highways only, and their completely benevolent, anti-socialist state and Federal oversight bodies. Thank god all highway funding comes from completely private, capitalist sources and not the Federal government. If it involves any kind of railroad it is a massive socialist government overreach and it must be beaten back and destroyed!
    ronn
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