Verizon aims for 5G Samsung smartphone launch in first half of 2019

Posted:
in General Discussion
Smartphone users in the United States will be able to use Verizon's 5G wireless network in the first half 2019 starting with Samsung devices, the carrier has announced, a move that means the main rival to Apple in the market will have a headstart on the iPhone in offering the high-speed connection to consumers.

Verizon's 5G logo


Verizon and Samsung will be revealing a "proof of concept" device during the annual Qualcomm Snapdragon Technology Summit later this week, the carrier confirmed. The device itself, while not described, will use Qualcomm components at its core, including the Snapdragon X50 5G NR modem and antenna modules, integrated RF transceiver, and other elements of the chip producer's Snapdragon Mobile Platform.

It is expected Verizon's 5G mobile network will become fully usable by smartphones and mobile devices in early 2019 and will expand at a fast pace. In order to allow consumers to use the new connectivity, Samsung has partnered with Samsung to create a smartphone that will work on the Verizon network at 5G speeds, most likely using Qualcomm's modems, shipping in the first half of 2019.

There is no mention of potential models or if it will be a premium device, but the suggestion of it being during the first half of the year rules out the flagship Note brand straight away. While it could cover the Galaxy S-series device launches, which typically launch in February or March, it is entirely possible the 2019 models could ship without 5G, and for a carrier-specific model to be produced with the support included.

As with other changes in mobile technology, the shift to 5G promises more bandwidth and faster connections across a cellular network. In the case of 5G, it is anticipated to offer speeds multiple times faster than current 4G LTE connections.

Verizon has already launched its first commercial 5G service in October, with its 5G Home offering cellular-based broadband in four markets. As it uses Verizon's own "proprietary 5G standard" for 5G Home, it is highly unlikely for the service's connectivity to be compatible with any 5G devices that are released in the future using an agreed industry standard version of 5G.

The announcement follows reports suggesting Apple will not be among the first smartphone producers to offer 5G connections on their devices. One report earlier today suggests Apple may not include 5G in its 2019 devices, leaving consumers waiting until 2020 for the first 5G-compatible iPhones to ship.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    If memory serves, didn't Android beat Apple to the 4G market space as well?  I know there was to me a significant difference in performance between 3G & 4G, but I don't really hear anyone complaining about how slow their phones access data any longer.  I'm not saying that 5G isn't going to be awesome just that 1st to market isn't necessary a good thing.  Does anyone even remember Sprint WiMax 4G network?
    Andy.Hardwake
  • Reply 2 of 23
    vukasika said:
    If memory serves, didn't Android beat Apple to the 4G market space as well?  I know there was to me a significant difference in performance between 3G & 4G, but I don't really hear anyone complaining about how slow their phones access data any longer.  I'm not saying that 5G isn't going to be awesome just that 1st to market isn't necessary a good thing.  Does anyone even remember Sprint WiMax 4G network?
    For me and everyone I know, the issue isn’t having faster data but more consistent and stable transmission of data. AKA, having signal more consistently. 
    Just my two cents. Don’t know enough about 5G to know if it will have any impact on this, particularly in less urban settings. 
    gilly33
  • Reply 3 of 23
    sergiozsergioz Posts: 216member
    The phone will feature Qualcomm's Snapdragon Mobile Platform with the Snapdragon X50 5G NR modem and antenna modules, along with integrated RF transceiver, RF front-end and antenna elements.
  • Reply 4 of 23

    I didn't see it mentioned in the article, but the reason Apple is currently predicted to not have 5G next year is due to intel not having modems ready until 2020.  Although, I just read an articled(don't remember where) that they expected Apple and Qualcomm to reach a settlement soon.  It will be interesting to see if they do reach a settlement if maybe the top tier 2019 iPhone would use a snapdragon modem with the R model using an Intel modem.   I don't think Apple will want to move completely away from Intel if for no other reason than retaining some negotiating leverage. 

    *Edit:  Went looking for the article I thought I had read, came up with the exact opposite, so likely no Snapdragon modem next year unless something drastically changes

    edited December 3
  • Reply 5 of 23
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 1,638member
    Why pay for tech in your phone or anything that is not usable most of the time ? Wide spread deployment of 5G won't happen until 2021 and beyond than why bother having 5G capable phone and the place many live/work fon't have 5G coverage. I wish cell carriers honestly provide reliable 4G LTE coverage and speed in most areas before offering 5G in few cities to start with. I will wait until 2021 to buy 5G phone.
    gilly33redgeminipa
  • Reply 6 of 23
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,461member
    wood1208 said:
    Why pay for tech in your phone or anything that is not usable most of the time ? Wide spread deployment of 5G won't happen until 2021 and beyond than why bother having 5G capable phone and the place many live/work fon't have 5G coverage. I wish cell carriers honestly provide reliable 4G LTE coverage and speed in most areas before offering 5G in few cities to start with. I will wait until 2021 to buy 5G phone.
    Fair comment. 
  • Reply 7 of 23
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 2,901member
    wood1208 said:
    Why pay for tech in your phone or anything that is not usable most of the time ? Wide spread deployment of 5G won't happen until 2021 and beyond than why bother having 5G capable phone and the place many live/work fon't have 5G coverage. I wish cell carriers honestly provide reliable 4G LTE coverage and speed in most areas before offering 5G in few cities to start with. I will wait until 2021 to buy 5G phone.
    I'm not sure what flavour of 5G will be available where you live but Spain is on track to see an important implementation of the 'non-standalone' specification, which was finalised a few months ago by 3GPP. 2019/20 should see large scale commercial offers becoming available. Pilots are already underway while government finalises the concession of the last frequencies.

    As this is not the stand-alone version, a lot of marketing will be needed to sway adoption of new plans but that can only happen if there are phones available to take advantage of the technology.

    Only those who have coverage will be interested, of course but the roll out might prove faster than we imagine in some markets.

    It might not be the best anology, but in some ways I see it like when 'HD Ready' began appearing on TVs. Then followed by the real thing, FullHD.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 8 of 23
    vukasika said:
    If memory serves, didn't Android beat Apple to the 4G market space as well?  I know there was to me a significant difference in performance between 3G & 4G, but I don't really hear anyone complaining about how slow their phones access data any longer.  I'm not saying that 5G isn't going to be awesome just that 1st to market isn't necessary a good thing.  Does anyone even remember Sprint WiMax 4G network?
    Android did release 4G phones before the iPhone, but it's kind of pointless since at the time, only a few markets had 4G. I imagine Apple will take the same route by supporting 5G when its widely available. 
    edited December 3 redgeminipa
  • Reply 9 of 23
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 4,461member
    vukasika said:
    If memory serves, didn't Android beat Apple to the 4G market space as well?  I know there was to me a significant difference in performance between 3G & 4G, but I don't really hear anyone complaining about how slow their phones access data any longer.  I'm not saying that 5G isn't going to be awesome just that 1st to market isn't necessary a good thing.  Does anyone even remember Sprint WiMax 4G network?
    Android did release 4G phones before the iPhone, but it's kind of pointless since at the time, only a few markets had 4G. I imagine Apple will take the same route by supporting 5G when its widely available. 
    Availability is the thing. Besides, Apple has never been first to the market with anything, and this seems to have little effect on the outcome. 

    Smartwatches? Were they first with the smart watch? Dunno. Probably not. 
  • Reply 10 of 23
    wood1208 said:
    Why pay for tech in your phone or anything that is not usable most of the time ? Wide spread deployment of 5G won't happen until 2021 and beyond than why bother having 5G capable phone and the place many live/work fon't have 5G coverage. I wish cell carriers honestly provide reliable 4G LTE coverage and speed in most areas before offering 5G in few cities to start with. I will wait until 2021 to buy 5G phone.
    Two reasons:
    1)  5G is being rolled out now -- not in 3 years.
    2)  Even if it isn't available in your area right now, unless you live out in the sticks somewhere, it probably will be during the life of your phone. 

    So, why sink a thousand or so into a soon to be obsolete phone?
  • Reply 11 of 23
    The question of being 5G ready is NOT "Can I use it on my phone today?"

    Rather it's "How long do I intend to keep this phone I'm buying today?"  And, by extension:  "Will I want to keep it after it is locked into an obsolete technology?"

    For those planning on keeping their phone a year or maybe even two it's mostly a non-issue (except in resale value).  But for those intending to keep their phones 3, 4 or 5 years, it is a very definite factor to consider.

    5G promises to add more than speed -- it is said to be a game changer by adding functionality not possible today.   But one of the things it could impact in a big way is cable -- especially for cord-cutters.   Why pay a cable bill AND a cell phone bill if you could eliminate the cable the same as you eliminated your copper wire land line?
  • Reply 12 of 23
    wood1208 said:
    Why pay for tech in your phone or anything that is not usable most of the time ? Wide spread deployment of 5G won't happen until 2021 and beyond than why bother having 5G capable phone and the place many live/work fon't have 5G coverage. I wish cell carriers honestly provide reliable 4G LTE coverage and speed in most areas before offering 5G in few cities to start with. I will wait until 2021 to buy 5G phone.
    Two reasons:
    1)  5G is being rolled out now -- not in 3 years.
    2)  Even if it isn't available in your area right now, unless you live out in the sticks somewhere, it probably will be during the life of your phone. 

    So, why sink a thousand or so into a soon to be obsolete phone?
    1) 5G may be rolling out now, but wide-scale adoption is still at least a year or more out. It was the same way with 3G and LTE. T-Mobile FINALLY launched LTE in my city (largest between Pittsburgh and Harrisburg, PA) LAST year. AT&T was the 3rd to launch it here, behind even Sprint, and that was only about 4 years ago.  

    2) As far as network technology being available sometime during the life of a phone, well... there are still people using the iPhone 4 and 4S. The numbers are becoming impossibly small, but they are still out there. 

    With every US carrier, and Apple itself, offering annual upgrade programs, fewer and fewer people are keeping phones much longer than a year. Not having 5G compatibility won’t make it “obsolete” anytime soon, as current LTE will be around for several years to come. Considering I often see speeds on Verizon over 100Mbps on LTE with my iPhone XS Max in my city, many people won’t complain about current LTE speeds. If anything, when more and more people start using 5G, it’ll free up congestion on LTE, meaning even better performance. 

    Oh, and Apple not supporting the newest cellular standards never slowed iPhone sales. First generation LTE chipsets were huge, and extremely power hungry. That’s a primary reason Apple held off on adoption, as it waited for the 2nd generation chipsets. The need for space and power is partly what created the trend for larger phones in the first place. The iPhone 5 had better LTE performance and battery life than any other phone on the market, and it was much smaller with a smaller battery. 


  • Reply 13 of 23
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,052member
    Rayz2016 said:
    vukasika said:
    If memory serves, didn't Android beat Apple to the 4G market space as well?  I know there was to me a significant difference in performance between 3G & 4G, but I don't really hear anyone complaining about how slow their phones access data any longer.  I'm not saying that 5G isn't going to be awesome just that 1st to market isn't necessary a good thing.  Does anyone even remember Sprint WiMax 4G network?
    Android did release 4G phones before the iPhone, but it's kind of pointless since at the time, only a few markets had 4G. I imagine Apple will take the same route by supporting 5G when its widely available. 
    Availability is the thing. Besides, Apple has never been first to the market with anything, and this seems to have little effect on the outcome. 

    Smartwatches? Were they first with the smart watch? Dunno. Probably not. 
    Samsung released a watch a year or two before the Apple Watch came out. The Galaxy Gear was a huge flop. I prefer Apple perfect a product before releasing instead of using Samsung's approach of rush to be first. 
  • Reply 14 of 23
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 3,253member
    wood1208 said:
    Why pay for tech in your phone or anything that is not usable most of the time ? Wide spread deployment of 5G won't happen until 2021 and beyond than why bother having 5G capable phone and the place many live/work fon't have 5G coverage. I wish cell carriers honestly provide reliable 4G LTE coverage and speed in most areas before offering 5G in few cities to start with. I will wait until 2021 to buy 5G phone.
    Two reasons:
    1)  5G is being rolled out now -- not in 3 years.
    2)  Even if it isn't available in your area right now, unless you live out in the sticks somewhere, it probably will be during the life of your phone. 

    So, why sink a thousand or so into a soon to be obsolete phone?
    1) 5G may be rolling out now, but wide-scale adoption is still at least a year or more out. It was the same way with 3G and LTE. T-Mobile FINALLY launched LTE in my city (largest between Pittsburgh and Harrisburg, PA) LAST year. AT&T was the 3rd to launch it here, behind even Sprint, and that was only about 4 years ago.  

    2) As far as network technology being available sometime during the life of a phone, well... there are still people using the iPhone 4 and 4S. The numbers are becoming impossibly small, but they are still out there. 

    With every US carrier, and Apple itself, offering annual upgrade programs, fewer and fewer people are keeping phones much longer than a year. Not having 5G compatibility won’t make it “obsolete” anytime soon, as current LTE will be around for several years to come. Considering I often see speeds on Verizon over 100Mbps on LTE with my iPhone XS Max in my city, many people won’t complain about current LTE speeds. If anything, when more and more people start using 5G, it’ll free up congestion on LTE, meaning even better performance. 

    Oh, and Apple not supporting the newest cellular standards never slowed iPhone sales. First generation LTE chipsets were huge, and extremely power hungry. That’s a primary reason Apple held off on adoption, as it waited for the 2nd generation chipsets. The need for space and power is partly what created the trend for larger phones in the first place. The iPhone 5 had better LTE performance and battery life than any other phone on the market, and it was much smaller with a smaller battery. 


    Between Pittsburgh and Harrisburg is a barren wasteland with a few rusted out steel mills and turnpike toll booths here and there.   Nobody cares about it -- you're lucky you have cell service at all.

    Hopefully Apple doesn't wait till you get 5G to add it to their phones -- we'll all be using Samsungs by then.
  • Reply 15 of 23
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 783member
     GeorgeBMac said:
    The question of being 5G ready is NOT "Can I use it on my phone today?"

    Rather it's "How long do I intend to keep this phone I'm buying today?"  And, by extension:  "Will I want to keep it after it is locked into an obsolete technology?"

    For those planning on keeping their phone a year or maybe even two it's mostly a non-issue (except in resale value).  But for those intending to keep their phones 3, 4 or 5 years, it is a very definite factor to consider.

    5G promises to add more than speed -- it is said to be a game changer by adding functionality not possible today.   But one of the things it could impact in a big way is cable -- especially for cord-cutters.   Why pay a cable bill AND a cell phone bill if you could eliminate the cable the same as you eliminated your copper wire land line?
    Apple was 'slow/late' to put 4G modems in their phones as well. They never explain any of their decisions, but the speculation was that they were waiting for a mature, low-power 4G modem. As far as sales goes, it didn't seem to hurt their sales then. 

    I have yet to see anyone explain how 5G will truly benefit the average cell phone user over existing 4G/LTE technology. 'low latency?' I'm not gaming on my phone and the network is the bottleneck. Faster speed? LTE is plenty fast enough. Replace my home broadband? It's going to be several years before my house in the suburbs of Mpls has 5G, and then the signals don't penetrate buildings well anyway so I'd have to get an antenna outside my house. Meaning 5G on my cell phone 5G would be useless. 

     If I get an iPhone Xs today, it will work just as well on all the 4G towers i 3 years as it does now. If I get 50% 4G signal, it's more than fast enough for me, so I have a hard time understanding how it would be considered obsolete. 
  • Reply 16 of 23
    MplsP said:
     GeorgeBMac said:
    The question of being 5G ready is NOT "Can I use it on my phone today?"

    Rather it's "How long do I intend to keep this phone I'm buying today?"  And, by extension:  "Will I want to keep it after it is locked into an obsolete technology?"

    For those planning on keeping their phone a year or maybe even two it's mostly a non-issue (except in resale value).  But for those intending to keep their phones 3, 4 or 5 years, it is a very definite factor to consider.

    5G promises to add more than speed -- it is said to be a game changer by adding functionality not possible today.   But one of the things it could impact in a big way is cable -- especially for cord-cutters.   Why pay a cable bill AND a cell phone bill if you could eliminate the cable the same as you eliminated your copper wire land line?
    Apple was 'slow/late' to put 4G modems in their phones as well. They never explain any of their decisions, but the speculation was that they were waiting for a mature, low-power 4G modem. As far as sales goes, it didn't seem to hurt their sales then. 

    I have yet to see anyone explain how 5G will truly benefit the average cell phone user over existing 4G/LTE technology. 'low latency?' I'm not gaming on my phone and the network is the bottleneck. Faster speed? LTE is plenty fast enough. Replace my home broadband? It's going to be several years before my house in the suburbs of Mpls has 5G, and then the signals don't penetrate buildings well anyway so I'd have to get an antenna outside my house. Meaning 5G on my cell phone 5G would be useless. 

     If I get an iPhone Xs today, it will work just as well on all the 4G towers i 3 years as it does now. If I get 50% 4G signal, it's more than fast enough for me, so I have a hard time understanding how it would be considered obsolete. 
    It seems that you believe that 5G will be the sort of evolutionary change that LTE was -- more of the same, just faster.   But that is not what industry insiders are predicting.   They say it will be more of revolutionary change than an evolutionary one.

    We shall see.
    But, while we wait, I have no desire to lock myself into a loser's technology.  
    Plus, when LTE rolled out people kept a phone 2 years.   It was rare to keep one longer.   Today that is no longer true.  If I'm paying top dollar (well over $1K) for a smart phone I'm thinking 3-5 years down the road.
  • Reply 17 of 23
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 19,414member
    vukasika said:
    If memory serves, didn't Android beat Apple to the 4G market space as well?  I know there was to me a significant difference in performance between 3G & 4G, but I don't really hear anyone complaining about how slow their phones access data any longer.  I'm not saying that 5G isn't going to be awesome just that 1st to market isn't necessary a good thing.  Does anyone even remember Sprint WiMax 4G network?
    Android did release 4G phones before the iPhone, but it's kind of pointless since at the time, only a few markets had 4G. I imagine Apple will take the same route by supporting 5G when its widely available. 
    I would hazard a guess that iPhones will support 5G just as soon as Intel has the appropriate modems ready for Apple. IMHO that's the reason for a delay if any. If Intel had 'em ready to go for the upcoming cycle Apple would include them. For the moment it's out of Apple's control unless they choose to settle with Qualcomm and buy their modems. 
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 18 of 23
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 783member
    MplsP said:
     GeorgeBMac said:
    The question of being 5G ready is NOT "Can I use it on my phone today?"

    Rather it's "How long do I intend to keep this phone I'm buying today?"  And, by extension:  "Will I want to keep it after it is locked into an obsolete technology?"

    For those planning on keeping their phone a year or maybe even two it's mostly a non-issue (except in resale value).  But for those intending to keep their phones 3, 4 or 5 years, it is a very definite factor to consider.

    5G promises to add more than speed -- it is said to be a game changer by adding functionality not possible today.   But one of the things it could impact in a big way is cable -- especially for cord-cutters.   Why pay a cable bill AND a cell phone bill if you could eliminate the cable the same as you eliminated your copper wire land line?
    Apple was 'slow/late' to put 4G modems in their phones as well. They never explain any of their decisions, but the speculation was that they were waiting for a mature, low-power 4G modem. As far as sales goes, it didn't seem to hurt their sales then. 

    I have yet to see anyone explain how 5G will truly benefit the average cell phone user over existing 4G/LTE technology. 'low latency?' I'm not gaming on my phone and the network is the bottleneck. Faster speed? LTE is plenty fast enough. Replace my home broadband? It's going to be several years before my house in the suburbs of Mpls has 5G, and then the signals don't penetrate buildings well anyway so I'd have to get an antenna outside my house. Meaning 5G on my cell phone 5G would be useless. 

     If I get an iPhone Xs today, it will work just as well on all the 4G towers i 3 years as it does now. If I get 50% 4G signal, it's more than fast enough for me, so I have a hard time understanding how it would be considered obsolete. 
    It seems that you believe that 5G will be the sort of evolutionary change that LTE was -- more of the same, just faster.   But that is not what industry insiders are predicting.   They say it will be more of revolutionary change than an evolutionary one.

    We shall see.
    But, while we wait, I have no desire to lock myself into a loser's technology.  
    Plus, when LTE rolled out people kept a phone 2 years.   It was rare to keep one longer.   Today that is no longer true.  If I'm paying top dollar (well over $1K) for a smart phone I'm thinking 3-5 years down the road.
    That’s what I keep asking. What exactly is this ‘revolutionary’ change? Everyone keeps gushing about how great it is but no one has any examples of how it’s going to make using my iphone any better. This makes me think that it’s a lot of tech-heads gushing about new technology just because it’s new and has better specs. I got over specs a long time ago.
  • Reply 19 of 23
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 3,253member
    gatorguy said:
    vukasika said:
    If memory serves, didn't Android beat Apple to the 4G market space as well?  I know there was to me a significant difference in performance between 3G & 4G, but I don't really hear anyone complaining about how slow their phones access data any longer.  I'm not saying that 5G isn't going to be awesome just that 1st to market isn't necessary a good thing.  Does anyone even remember Sprint WiMax 4G network?
    Android did release 4G phones before the iPhone, but it's kind of pointless since at the time, only a few markets had 4G. I imagine Apple will take the same route by supporting 5G when its widely available. 
    I would hazard a guess that iPhones will support 5G just as soon as Intel has the appropriate modems ready for Apple. IMHO that's the reason for a delay if any. If Intel had 'em ready to go for the upcoming cycle Apple would include them. For the moment it's out of Apple's control unless they choose to settle with Qualcomm and buy their modems. 
    You nailed it!
    This is a business decision rather than a technical limitation.
  • Reply 20 of 23
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 2,901member
    MplsP said:
    MplsP said:
     GeorgeBMac said:
    The question of being 5G ready is NOT "Can I use it on my phone today?"

    Rather it's "How long do I intend to keep this phone I'm buying today?"  And, by extension:  "Will I want to keep it after it is locked into an obsolete technology?"

    For those planning on keeping their phone a year or maybe even two it's mostly a non-issue (except in resale value).  But for those intending to keep their phones 3, 4 or 5 years, it is a very definite factor to consider.

    5G promises to add more than speed -- it is said to be a game changer by adding functionality not possible today.   But one of the things it could impact in a big way is cable -- especially for cord-cutters.   Why pay a cable bill AND a cell phone bill if you could eliminate the cable the same as you eliminated your copper wire land line?
    Apple was 'slow/late' to put 4G modems in their phones as well. They never explain any of their decisions, but the speculation was that they were waiting for a mature, low-power 4G modem. As far as sales goes, it didn't seem to hurt their sales then. 

    I have yet to see anyone explain how 5G will truly benefit the average cell phone user over existing 4G/LTE technology. 'low latency?' I'm not gaming on my phone and the network is the bottleneck. Faster speed? LTE is plenty fast enough. Replace my home broadband? It's going to be several years before my house in the suburbs of Mpls has 5G, and then the signals don't penetrate buildings well anyway so I'd have to get an antenna outside my house. Meaning 5G on my cell phone 5G would be useless. 

     If I get an iPhone Xs today, it will work just as well on all the 4G towers i 3 years as it does now. If I get 50% 4G signal, it's more than fast enough for me, so I have a hard time understanding how it would be considered obsolete. 
    It seems that you believe that 5G will be the sort of evolutionary change that LTE was -- more of the same, just faster.   But that is not what industry insiders are predicting.   They say it will be more of revolutionary change than an evolutionary one.

    We shall see.
    But, while we wait, I have no desire to lock myself into a loser's technology.  
    Plus, when LTE rolled out people kept a phone 2 years.   It was rare to keep one longer.   Today that is no longer true.  If I'm paying top dollar (well over $1K) for a smart phone I'm thinking 3-5 years down the road.
    That’s what I keep asking. What exactly is this ‘revolutionary’ change? Everyone keeps gushing about how great it is but no one has any examples of how it’s going to make using my iphone any better. This makes me think that it’s a lot of tech-heads gushing about new technology just because it’s new and has better specs. I got over specs a long time ago.
    There are potentially unlimited use cases for 5G going forward and they go way beyond phones.

    This is one I read about years ago related to salmon farming. The idea being that a 5G equiped sensor for lice could be placed on each fish to track infestations in real time.

    Another more mundane use is in logistics. For example there are plans for the port of Barcelona to go 5G for container logistics.
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