Apple's USB-C charger and third-party USB-C Lightning cables are good signs for future iPh...

Posted:
in iPad edited December 6
Apple is now selling its own 18W USB-C charger and is now allowing third-party MFi certified Lightning to USB-C cables. AppleInsider discusses why this is a good sign for future USB-C parity in all of Apple's chargers.

18W and 12W Apple power adapters
18W and 12W Apple power adapters


Last month, Apple released the new iPad Pro, and it ditched the Lightning port for a USB-C port. Along with that, it came with an 18W USB-C power adapter that charges faster than the previously included 12W charger.

This charger isn't only designed for iPad, but is packing the exact amount of wattage to reach the full potential of fast charging on iPhone 8 and newer iPhones like the X, XS, and XR. It wasn't available for purchase separately, until just yesterday, the 5th of December.






Previously, if you went the Apple-charger route, you'd have to buy at least a 29W MacBook power adapter and a USB-C to Lightning cable to get fast charging, which would run you $68 and be far more power than you needed.

Now, with the new 18W USB-C Power adapter on sale separately for only $29, you can get fast charging for quite a bit cheaper, and that's not the end of it.

Charging Speed Comparison
Charging speed comparisons | Source: Michael Kummer


Just last week, Apple informed members of its MFI licensing program that they can now manufacture USB-C to Lightning cables, and they started selling newly updated Lightning connectors that are able to supply 18 watts for Fast Charging or up to 15 watts of power with a standard power adapter.

For consumers, the best part about this is that the third-party cables are going to be significantly cheaper and more durable than Apple's $19 option. With third parties involved, we will see rugged, longer, and other variations on the basic cable. Based on current lead times to receive the parts from Apple, they could start hitting store shelves as early as February to March next year.

Now that third-parties can start releasing these cables, it is possible that a USB-C charger will come with future iPhones, finally, ditching that old and slow USB-A 5-watt charger.

Apple Watch Series 4
Apple Watch Series 4


Earlier this year, Apple also released a USB-C Apple Watch charger which will likely come with next year's Apple Watch if they do make the switch to USB-C for power adapters across all product lineups.

There is a chance that Apple will ditch Lightning all together, switching to USB-C on next year's iPhones, but that's still a bit of a stretch.

5W USB power adapter
5W USB power adapter


We've been dealing with these slow 5-watt chargers for far too long now, and there shouldn't be any outrage over the switch from USB-A to USB-C since the market will already be loaded with third-party USB-C power adapters and USB-C to Lightning cables.

Only thing we can do is wait to see how it all plays out.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 14
    Are you sure 18W Charger is enough for iPhone fast charging? It’s not listed in the description for the 18W charger but is for the 30W one.


    edited December 6
  • Reply 2 of 14
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 3,719administrator
    Are you sure 18W Charger is enough for iPhone fast charging? It’s not listed in the description for the 18W charger but is for the 30W one.


    Yes, we're sure.
    chiaAirunJae
  • Reply 3 of 14
    Just got an iPad Pro 11" (2, actually) and was VERY unpleasantly surprised that the new 18W charger doesn't use the same detachable/swappable plug system that nearly EVERY Apple charger has used for years!

    When traveling, I just swap out the US plug for a Euro plug and don't have to mess with adaptors.
    SO many Euro plugs are loose, so that heavy, bulky power adaptors with additional plug adaptors fall out. PITA!
  • Reply 4 of 14
    ksecksec Posts: 1,515member
    I am hoping we get the new 18W charger as default in the next iPhone line up. The sad thing is this thing cost $10 more than the old 5W charger..... given the current Apple nickel and dimming........
  • Reply 5 of 14
    anomeanome Posts: 1,176member
    Just got an iPad Pro 11" (2, actually) and was VERY unpleasantly surprised that the new 18W charger doesn't use the same detachable/swappable plug system that nearly EVERY Apple charger has used for years!

    When traveling, I just swap out the US plug for a Euro plug and don't have to mess with adaptors.
    SO many Euro plugs are loose, so that heavy, bulky power adaptors with additional plug adaptors fall out. PITA!

     The Travel Adapter kit still works with the 30W USB-C chargers and up. Or the old 12W USB-A charger. It is annoying that the 18W charger doesn't work that way. I never use the 5W charger that comes with my iPhone, at least not since they went with the smaller design. I've even used the Twelve South PlugBug plugged into the 12W charger to charge my iPad and iPhone at the same time. (It works, but doesn't look very elegant.)

    As for loose plugs, I tend to have that problem more when visiting the US, especially in older hotels. And the 87W power brick is really hefty.

  • Reply 6 of 14
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 547member
    Are you sure 18W Charger is enough for iPhone fast charging? It’s not listed in the description for the 18W charger but is for the 30W one.


    Yes, we're sure.
    I posted this in another article earlier.. Apple seems vague saying the 18W charger may charge some devices faster than the 5w charger without saying fast charge... but confirms fast charging for sure starting with the 29W through 87W power adapters?

    Not doubting just seems strange to word it that way.

    Using an Apple 18W, 12W, or 10W USB power adapter charges some Apple devices and accessories faster than a 5W power adapter. Apple 29W, 30W, 61W, and 87W USB-C Power Adapter and Apple USB-C to Lightning cable are fast charge compatible with the following devices.

    • Phone XS Max
    • iPhone XS
    • iPhone XR
    • iPhone X
    • iPhone 8
    • iPhone 8 Plus
    • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (3rd generation)
    • iPad Pro 12.9-inch (2nd generation)
    • iPad Pro 12.9-inch
    • iPad Pro 11-inch
    • iPad Pro 10.5-inch



  • Reply 7 of 14
    ajmasajmas Posts: 551member
    The Apple charger might be more than some knock off brands, but do you really want to trust anything except brands that will back their chargers?
    mike1
  • Reply 8 of 14
    mike1mike1 Posts: 1,762member
    Charging Speed Comparison

    I didn't see which device was used to generate this data, but fast charging on the phone really only saves an hour.
    Using a 5-watt adaptor will theoretically charge phone to 78% in two hours and fully charge the phone 13 minutes later for a total of 2:13 charging time.
    Using the 18-watt adaptor will theoretically charge phone to 79% in one hour and fully charge the phone 13 (12.6) minutes later for a total of 1:13 charging time.

    So, if you typically charge the phone overnight, that hour is irrelevant. To insist that the bigger charger should be included with a phone is just not realistic and unnecessary for most users. Why burden every phone with the higher cost charger?





    williamlondon
  • Reply 9 of 14
    thttht Posts: 2,978member
    mike1 said:
    Charging Speed Comparison

    I didn't see which device was used to generate this data, but fast charging on the phone really only saves an hour.
    These look like iPhone X times. Or perhaps iPhone 8 Plus. Macrumors.com also did the same thing, and presented the data in similar, unreadable chart fashion. Like the insanity of plotting lines on category based bar chart. Ugh. Here is my attempt to make it more readable:


    Horrible that I couldn’t use the pdf version of this. It was just 14 KB. The iOS Shortcut converted it into a 500 KB jpg!

    Anyways, if whoever was testing this ran it to 100%, the 18 W charger might have charged the phone about 10 min faster than the 12W USBA charger. Not much gain over the 12W.

    mike1 said:
    Using a 5-watt adaptor will theoretically charge phone to 78% in two hours and fully charge the phone 13 minutes later for a total of 2:13 charging time.

    Using the 18-watt adaptor will theoretically charge phone to 79% in one hour and fully charge the phone 13 (12.6) minutes later for a total of 1:13 charging time.

    So, if you typically charge the phone overnight, that hour is irrelevant. To insist that the bigger charger should be included with a phone is just not realistic and unnecessary for most users. Why burden every phone with the higher cost charger?
    People on the Internet want the most bang for the buck, and they are vocal about it. By people, it’s like 1% of people, and not necessarily actual customers or even potential buyers. A lot of the complaints come from fanboy wars, which is at least half of the comments from fan forums, and most of them have no intention of buying the product.

    I’m still unclear of usage of these super fast chargers. There will be a subset of people who do not charge their phones overnight. They only charge when the charge levels gets to <10%. There is like a generational memory of charging war stories with nickel-cadmium and metal hydride batteries that won’t die. Or people who simply don’t notice they are running out of battery and don’t charge until the phone is out. So faster charging for them could be great for them, but they would be better just getting into the habit of charging overnight.

    There are people who are on their phones nonstop, with the screen on all the time, and need to charge their phones mid day. So fast charging is great for them. Uh, nothing else? That’s about 1% of the market? Less? Getting a battery case and an external battery would address their usage, or they should get a phone with the fastest charge rates.
  • Reply 10 of 14
    So is Apple sanctioning "Fast Charging" on a regular full time basis? I have the Apple 29W adapter that I use if my iPhone X hits the 10% battery level (once a week, if that) and my Wife uses it on her iPad Pro 10.5 when the battery level hits the 10% battery level (hardly ever). If possible, we try to disconnect when the battery level is around 80%. I charge my iPhone X overnight on a Belkin BOOST↑UP™ Wireless Charging Pad 7.5W and my Wife charges her iPad Pro with the power adapter that came with the iPad. So I have attempted to mitigate the early demise of the batteries on both of these devices since they came out of the box. Any thoughts on this?

  • Reply 11 of 14
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,606member
    mike1 said:

    So, if you typically charge the phone overnight, that hour is irrelevant. To insist that the bigger charger should be included with a phone is just not realistic and unnecessary for most users. Why burden every phone with the higher cost charger?
    Why burden every phone with the cost of any charger, since most iPhone buyers are previous iPhone buyers, and therefore are more than likely to have at least one charger (and cable, and set of AirPods) already
    edited December 8
  • Reply 12 of 14
    Whew, that's not fast at all ...



    williamlondon
  • Reply 13 of 14
    Seth2015 said:
    Whew, that's not fast at all ...
    Wow, you just love smearing your joy all over this forum.
  • Reply 14 of 14
    18 watts?

    Some flagship phones are twice that . Hell, my *wireless *charging isn't too far from that.

    I just expected more, I guess
    edited December 9 williamlondon
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