How to keep your iPhone from repeatedly dropping Wi-Fi network connections

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 29
    macguimacgui Posts: 1,354member
    for some reason iOS doesn't let it work with a copy and paste. It has to be hand keyed -- anyone know why?

    It's the security feature Secure Input implemented by Apple. This is to prevent third-party apps from seeing your passwords and returning that data to a rouge dev.

    fastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 29
    lssmit said:
    deminsd said:
    I think it is important to tell people that "Reset Network Settings" causes your iPhone to forget every WIFI password for every WIFI network you've been on.

    That could be an issue for some people.  I did a "Reset Network Settings" by recommendation from some article to fix an issue and realized later I lost all my saved WIFI networks.  I would have rather lived with the issue I was trying to fix than to lose my history of saved WIFI networks and passwords.
    The best way to avoid resetting all of your Wi-Fi passwords for your other devices when you reset the network on your iPhone is to turn off iCloud Keychain before hand. So the process would be: Turn off iCloud Keychain>Reset Network settings on your phone>Turn on iCloud Keychain on your phone. This should result in all of your Wi-Fi passwords being re-downloaded to your phone after the reset.
    Are you sure? I know you can access WiFi Keychain info on a Mac, but you can’t on an IPhone. For instance, let’s say I’ve been to a friends house with my MacBook and entered the WiFi password. I can access that info, but only on my MacBook. If I then go over a different time without my MacBook and only my iPhone I have to put in the WiFi password again. 

    Im not confident this works. 
  • Reply 23 of 29
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,078member
    lssmit said:
    deminsd said:
    I think it is important to tell people that "Reset Network Settings" causes your iPhone to forget every WIFI password for every WIFI network you've been on.

    That could be an issue for some people.  I did a "Reset Network Settings" by recommendation from some article to fix an issue and realized later I lost all my saved WIFI networks.  I would have rather lived with the issue I was trying to fix than to lose my history of saved WIFI networks and passwords.
    The best way to avoid resetting all of your Wi-Fi passwords for your other devices when you reset the network on your iPhone is to turn off iCloud Keychain before hand. So the process would be: Turn off iCloud Keychain>Reset Network settings on your phone>Turn on iCloud Keychain on your phone. This should result in all of your Wi-Fi passwords being re-downloaded to your phone after the reset.
    Are you sure? I know you can access WiFi Keychain info on a Mac, but you can’t on an IPhone. For instance, let’s say I’ve been to a friends house with my MacBook and entered the WiFi password. I can access that info, but only on my MacBook. If I then go over a different time without my MacBook and only my iPhone I have to put in the WiFi password again. 

    Im not confident this works. 
    Your iOS device should then have that password available to it, despite the fact there's no Keychain Access app on there. The passwords are shared across iCloud, assuming iCloud Keychain is turned on.

    Between that, and the feature where you get prompted to share wifi passwords with a contact who is prompted to enter it on their device, they've really made things quite a bit easier. These are the little things where Apple just kills it.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 29
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 2,257member
    You don’t know why? iOS 12.1.2 was the obvious beginning of the problem on my iPhone 6s.
  • Reply 25 of 29
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,753administrator
    dysamoria said:
    You don’t know why? iOS 12.1.2 was the obvious beginning of the problem on my iPhone 6s.
    There is evidence of it popping up back to iOS 10.1.
  • Reply 26 of 29
    maltzmaltz Posts: 144member
    knowitall said:
    ios devices should automatically connect to the strongest network in range (it can connect to) not ‘a’ network, and should switch to the strongest network wile connected.
    iOS should expose the list and preference order in the user interface like macOS does, so YOU can choose which networks it prefers.  The strongest signal isn't always the best choice.  Also, so you can "forget" networks that you're not currently connected to without nuking all network settings, also like macOS... and Windows.  and Android.  And every other OS I've ever seen.
  • Reply 27 of 29
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 3,078member
    maltz said:
    knowitall said:
    ios devices should automatically connect to the strongest network in range (it can connect to) not ‘a’ network, and should switch to the strongest network wile connected.
    iOS should expose the list and preference order in the user interface like macOS does, so YOU can choose which networks it prefers.  The strongest signal isn't always the best choice.  Also, so you can "forget" networks that you're not currently connected to without nuking all network settings, also like macOS... and Windows.  and Android.  And every other OS I've ever seen.
    You can “forget” networks. Hit the info button on the network and it’s the top option. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 29
    Exactly, “Turn of *ask to join networks*”. 
    I did this years ago because ot the annoying pop ups for networking, while i was or was not already joined to a network.  
    Flicking the little button to the off position fixed a myriad of issues i was personally experiencing, give it a go if all else has failed you.  Nothing lost, perhaps a lot gained! 
  • Reply 29 of 29
    maltzmaltz Posts: 144member
    maltz said:
    knowitall said:
    ios devices should automatically connect to the strongest network in range (it can connect to) not ‘a’ network, and should switch to the strongest network wile connected.
    iOS should expose the list and preference order in the user interface like macOS does, so YOU can choose which networks it prefers.  The strongest signal isn't always the best choice.  Also, so you can "forget" networks that you're not currently connected to without nuking all network settings, also like macOS... and Windows.  and Android.  And every other OS I've ever seen.
    You can “forget” networks. Hit the info button on the network and it’s the top option. 
    Only when you're in range of it.  There is no way to see the list of "known" networks, and there is no way at all to reorder them.
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