TCL, LG under pressure from customers about AirPlay 2 compatibility

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 32
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    gatorguy said:
    mac_128 said:
    AirPlay is a competitive advantage for Samsung TV over LG.

    Tizen is a negative.  LG’s WebOS is a positive.

    Visio having AirPlay is compelling.

    I didn’t know about the TCL/Roku.  That’s an interesting option at the lower end, and would probably make a good bedroom TV.



    TCL is only "budget" in price. Their TVs are ahead of the game supporting Dolby Vision. A beauty for Apple TV.


    Roku is a nightmare though!!!

    I just read an article that suggests TLC and Vizio manage to change so little for their TVs because they collect and sell every piece of data they can from a customers use of them. 

    My Sony is definitely not a budget TV, but even it has an BG app called Samba which evendently reports to Sony everything I do and watch with my TV. I only found this out while seeking to disable it because it slowed down my UI. It was also brought to my attention that in the EULA, I was agreeing to give away a ton of user data by enabling auto software updates. I believe TLC is a Chinese company as well.
    I have a TCL 4k and you are correct that if you don't change the defaults then usage data is funneling back. So like you should with just about every electronic device nowadays (even your iPhone for that matter) simply change the defaults. It's not hard. Do a bit of research on what and where, and ignore the way controls are sometimes framed as "turning this off will end this valuable thing we're doing for you". Sometimes it is but more often than not you won't miss a thing.

    My TCL isn't sending my personal information anywhere AFAICT. Leave the factory defaults as is and yes every company will use them to their advantage. Why wouldn't they? They aren't in it for the charity.
    https://www.imore.com/how-change-privacy-settings-apple-tv
    As far as you know.

    im not overly paranoid about this, but certainly recently reported incidents about disabling google apps from sharing location, and then discovering that the user preference actually had no effect is troubling.

    bottom line for me is that any TV connected to the internet is probably sharing some data about you which you aren’t able to control, or are otherwise unaware. I don’t connect my smart TVs to the internet. My Apple TV is, but not the Sony, mainly because it runs more slowly when connected. I really miss the days of dumb monitors which do one thing and do it well, so paying a premium is going exactly where I want it — to the picture quality. I don’t really see the value of building all that technology directly into the TV.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 23 of 32
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,088member
    mac_128 said:
    gatorguy said:
    mac_128 said:
    AirPlay is a competitive advantage for Samsung TV over LG.

    Tizen is a negative.  LG’s WebOS is a positive.

    Visio having AirPlay is compelling.

    I didn’t know about the TCL/Roku.  That’s an interesting option at the lower end, and would probably make a good bedroom TV.



    TCL is only "budget" in price. Their TVs are ahead of the game supporting Dolby Vision. A beauty for Apple TV.


    Roku is a nightmare though!!!

    I just read an article that suggests TLC and Vizio manage to change so little for their TVs because they collect and sell every piece of data they can from a customers use of them. 

    My Sony is definitely not a budget TV, but even it has an BG app called Samba which evendently reports to Sony everything I do and watch with my TV. I only found this out while seeking to disable it because it slowed down my UI. It was also brought to my attention that in the EULA, I was agreeing to give away a ton of user data by enabling auto software updates. I believe TLC is a Chinese company as well.
    I have a TCL 4k and you are correct that if you don't change the defaults then usage data is funneling back. So like you should with just about every electronic device nowadays (even your iPhone for that matter) simply change the defaults. It's not hard. Do a bit of research on what and where, and ignore the way controls are sometimes framed as "turning this off will end this valuable thing we're doing for you". Sometimes it is but more often than not you won't miss a thing.

    My TCL isn't sending my personal information anywhere AFAICT. Leave the factory defaults as is and yes every company will use them to their advantage. Why wouldn't they? They aren't in it for the charity.
    https://www.imore.com/how-change-privacy-settings-apple-tv
    As far as you know.

    im not overly paranoid about this, but certainly recently reported incidents about disabling google apps from sharing location, and then discovering that the user preference actually had no effect is troubling
    That's not exactly what was going on and TBH it was generally understood after the fact that it was a non-issue, but I absolutely understand people's concerns over all of this.

    Aren't the collective "we" always fearful/distrustful of new technologies? Cameras all around us, microphones in places we wouldn't expect them to be. Bluetooth beacons, and wifi location trackers and advertising identifiers and "smart assistants", lane departure and auto-stopping vehicles, even totally self-driving. It's a lot to take in and digest. It's natural to mistrust what you don't understand. In my case that might include Amazon. I've not done near enough research on them and while everything might be hunky-dory I don't know enough about 'em. 

    Personally whenever I get a new device for my home or vehicle one of the very first things I do is a websearch regarding settings, especially privacy settings and where to find them. I read the EULA's (yeah I know, lawyer speak and permissions with double meanings and sometimes unusual and confusing connections to other docs). But ya gotta read em and if you don't understand them research what they mean. And when you do don't use a competitors hard-nosed fansite to do so. Their members are not very likely to give a straightforward AND honest answer about it. First they probably don't know the facts anyway and second they are likely to look unkindly on competitors no matter the product or feature. There's lots of web resources that have no particular competitive reason to slant the explanation. Search 'em out. 

    Anyway I've got a couple hundred photo session images to process from earlier this morning so ....
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 24 of 32
    I had Now TV (UK) set top box and it is based on Roku. It's sh1te - Slow and, what app? I just bought myself an Apple TV 4K after finally getting a 4K TV (with Dolby Vision, HDR10 amd HDR HLG) and it's much better.
  • Reply 25 of 32
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,820administrator
    Well perhaps a better strategy regarding the pricing of Apple TV with it’s lesser feature set and limited Voice assistant would’ve been a more profitable long term strategy that would not have required this last minute crap ass app strategy. 

    It should have cost 80$ - then everyone with an iPhone would own them. Not just old people and fanboys. 

    They do dumb things. 

    Everything they sell sell costs too much for thier primary market and they can rationalize the price with fancy recycling or whatever new bullshit Tim is selling but every other competitor is cheaper and more plentiful and the market they’ve created will not support the pricing and 30% margins they’d prefer. Their design, iOS and its security (a marketing ploy at best) is no longer special or unique. 

    I don’t say that because I can’t afford thier products - I say that as it’s become clear the American people don’t make enough money on average to be giving Apple well over a 1000$ a year. 

    No should be taking out a loan or a lease to buy a phone or a computer. We lived without them just fine - the entire mess is optional. 

    Its a stupid strategy. Great for investors perhaps until the iPhone becomes a Mercedes and Chevy despite its flaws is what people MUST buy. 


    Third gen for $69 for almost two years prior to the fourth gen release didn't make much of a dent, if any at all.
  • Reply 26 of 32
    mac_128mac_128 Posts: 3,454member
    gatorguy said:
    mac_128 said:
    gatorguy said:
    mac_128 said:
    AirPlay is a competitive advantage for Samsung TV over LG.

    Tizen is a negative.  LG’s WebOS is a positive.

    Visio having AirPlay is compelling.

    I didn’t know about the TCL/Roku.  That’s an interesting option at the lower end, and would probably make a good bedroom TV.



    TCL is only "budget" in price. Their TVs are ahead of the game supporting Dolby Vision. A beauty for Apple TV.


    Roku is a nightmare though!!!

    I just read an article that suggests TLC and Vizio manage to change so little for their TVs because they collect and sell every piece of data they can from a customers use of them. 

    My Sony is definitely not a budget TV, but even it has an BG app called Samba which evendently reports to Sony everything I do and watch with my TV. I only found this out while seeking to disable it because it slowed down my UI. It was also brought to my attention that in the EULA, I was agreeing to give away a ton of user data by enabling auto software updates. I believe TLC is a Chinese company as well.
    I have a TCL 4k and you are correct that if you don't change the defaults then usage data is funneling back. So like you should with just about every electronic device nowadays (even your iPhone for that matter) simply change the defaults. It's not hard. Do a bit of research on what and where, and ignore the way controls are sometimes framed as "turning this off will end this valuable thing we're doing for you". Sometimes it is but more often than not you won't miss a thing.

    My TCL isn't sending my personal information anywhere AFAICT. Leave the factory defaults as is and yes every company will use them to their advantage. Why wouldn't they? They aren't in it for the charity.
    https://www.imore.com/how-change-privacy-settings-apple-tv
    As far as you know.

    im not overly paranoid about this, but certainly recently reported incidents about disabling google apps from sharing location, and then discovering that the user preference actually had no effect is troubling
    That's not exactly what was going on and TBH it was generally understood after the fact that it was a non-issue, but I absolutely understand people's concerns over all of this.

    Aren't the collective "we" always fearful/distrustful of new technologies? Cameras all around us, microphones in places we wouldn't expect them to be. Bluetooth beacons, and wifi location trackers and advertising identifiers and "smart assistants", lane departure and auto-stopping vehicles, even totally self-driving. It's a lot to take in and digest. It's natural to mistrust what you don't understand. In my case that might include Amazon. I've not done near enough research on them and while everything might be hunky-dory I don't know enough about 'em. 

    Personally whenever I get a new device for my home or vehicle one of the very first things I do is a websearch regarding settings, especially privacy settings and where to find them. I read the EULA's (yeah I know, lawyer speak and permissions with double meanings and sometimes unusual and confusing connections to other docs). But ya gotta read em and if you don't understand them research what they mean. And when you do don't use a competitors hard-nosed fansite to do so. Their members are not very likely to give a straightforward AND honest answer about it. First they probably don't know the facts anyway and second they are likely to look unkindly on competitors no matter the product or feature. There's lots of web resources that have no particular competitive reason to slant the explanation. Search 'em out. 

    Anyway I've got a couple hundred photo session images to process from earlier this morning so ....
    Who has time for all of that? If I don’t need to use smart features, I just don’t connect it to the internet, and then I don’t have to do anything (and I see no reason to buy a TV for its smart features or use them as I stated in my OP). As I said I’m not paranoid about any of this. I have plenty of devices connected to the internet and I’ve not read the EULAs, or gone beyond a basic visit to the settings and flipped some virtual toggles. But there’s nothing I’m doing with any of these devices I’m overlay concerned about sharing with anyone. Doesn’t mean I don’t still have some reservations about the ramifications about sharing all of this information, but for now, it’s not worth much more time than I spend on it. I understand it perfectly fine. Perhaps you don’t to invest so much effort. But more importantly, I don’t need it. Things that truly matter, which I use, I invest time into, especially if I don’t understand them. But the average person doesn’t. And the manufacturers prey on that mentality, while doing nothing to reassure those who don’t understand the new technology. That’s a bad combination which justifiably brings consumer wrath and suspicion onto them.

    TCL is a Chinese company, that is selling their products on razor thin margins, by offsetting costs collecting and selling everything they can about the customers who purchase their products. I have no interest in supporting that model, even if it means saving a couple of hundred bucks. Then again I can afford such ideological luxuries. So who am I to judge anyone? I’m just saying...

    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 27 of 32
    FatmanFatman Posts: 513member
    I’m not sure if I’m excited or not about this. I have a 2018 Vizio paired with Apple TV 4K. ATV is by far the best streamer made, I have  a Roku and Amazon Fire to compare it to, and the Vizio has built in Chromecast (laggy interface) so I’ve tried them all. Apple costs more but at $179 it’s worth it - it’s more for enthusiasts not grandmas or those that buy cheap dongles with inadequate processors. With the superior processing, Dolby Vision, Atmos, quality apps, Gbit Ethernet, and nice control options over video output and syncing content, it consistently gives me the best 4K picture - and that is what matters most to me (plus great audio sound through my Aventage). Airplaying to the TV via AppleTV is flawless, I can’t say the same for the glitchy chromecast. So having the TV itself support AirPlay, I assume is for those that don’t own an AppleTV? I don’t talk to my TV, so the Alexa, Google integration isn’t as important (and I have one of each of those as well). I rately use Siri voice control,  just the remote - which could use some design improvements. I also can’t think of a use case where I would need to control my TV via HomeKit.
  • Reply 28 of 32
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member


    It should have cost 80$ - then everyone with an iPhone would own them. Not just old people and fanboys. 

    They do dumb things


    You write dumb stuff. 

    If they sold it for $1 then everyone with a TV would own one. 
    edited January 2019
  • Reply 29 of 32
    FatmanFatman Posts: 513member
    TCL strategy: Dump low priced (and decently spec’d) TVs on the American public so the Chinese govt has another way of collecting data - I’d like to see what it can access from your home network, files from your connected work laptop, etc.
  • Reply 30 of 32
    I have a TCL tv that I really like, but HomeKit is an important feature to me, and I would not buy another TCL without it. TCL makes good products, but since I don’t use their Roku interface at all, I am not locked into their brand. On the other hand, being able to integrate my TV into HomeKit scenes would make a big difference to me.
  • Reply 31 of 32
    Signed the petition for older OLED LG TVs to support Apple technologies - if they are bringing it as a software solution to the newest ones and older TVs also run WebOS then it is just a matter if good will on LG’s side to provide an update. There should not be any technical limitations.
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