China lambastes Apple, others for 'incorrect' references to Hong Kong & Taiwan

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in General Discussion
A think tank linked to the Chinese government is criticizing Apple, Amazon, Nike and other foreign companies for using "incorrect labels" in reference to Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Apple's Taipei 101 store is considered part of China on its website, but not in Apple Maps.
Apple's Taipei 101 store is considered part of China on its website, but not in Apple Maps.


Of the world's 500 biggest corporations, 66 are mislabeling Taiwan, 53 are mislabeling Hong Kong, and 45 are guilty of both, the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences said in a report seen by Reuters. The study, still not public, was done in conjunction with the Internet Development Research Institution at Peking University.

China has been intensifying pressure on foreign companies since last year, hoping to get them to legitimize its view of the above territories.

Once controlled as a British colony, Hong Kong was returned to China in 1997 but still exists as a semi-autonomous region. Apple and others often treat it as distinct from China, mostly since it has its own currency and a unique market, and most of its residents speak Cantonese instead of Mandarin.

More contentious is Taiwan. Though it has existed as an independent entity for decades, the Chinese government considers it a rogue province and has threatened military force if it formally declares independence. China also refuses diplomatic relations with countries that recognize the Taiwanese republic, though in practice most of the world's biggest powers have informal relations, including the U.S. -- whose military commitments have kept China at bay.

Apple maintains separate websites for both Hong Kong and Taiwan. It does make references to Taiwan as being part of China on the Web, but at least in the U.S. version of Apple Maps the country's capital, Taipei, is marked as independent.

The company has often tread a thin line between appeasing China versus recognizing reality and living up to its stated principles. Critics have accused Apple of being too quick to bend to government demands, and turning a blind eye to human rights abuses despite claiming to champion them elsewhere. This is presumably because of the size of the Chinese market, even with increasingly disappointing iPhone sales contributing to a $5 billion shortfall in December-quarter revenue.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    From a historical perspective, the mainland's attitude and official position are completely understandable, but I've always thought that talks about peaceful reunification would actually be far easier if they started from the acknowledgement that there are, in effect, two independent countries in play here. Is anyone remotely surprised that telling Taiwan that it's just a rebellious province that needs to come in from the cold hasn't been very helpful?
    russwbeowulfschmidtelijahgravnorodomentropysbonobobDeelronwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 21
    tbornottbornot Posts: 106member
    Tibet joined with China.  Sure, they were all sent off to internment camps, but no one cared.  What could Taiwan have to fear?
    ksecjbdragonelijahggatorguymagman1979ravnorodomsvanstromanantksundaramentropyscornchip
  • Reply 3 of 21
    “Think” Tank? Sounds like just the opposite. Ministry of Correct Think maybe. 1984. 
    magman1979ravnorodomtokyojimuanantksundaramentropyswatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 21
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,876member
    China is copying US ideology of political correctness PC.
  • Reply 5 of 21
    If it hadn't been for the size of the Chinese market, as well as China's expansion into basically every market there is (especially Africa; Kenya is even about to start teaching Mandarin in all primary schools), then the world would easily have been very vocally on the side of the people wanting nothing more than a democratic say about their own lives; meaning areas like Hong Kong, Taiwan, Tibet and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

    Last year in Hong Kong the Hong Kong National Party got banned for nothing more than being pro-independence on a peaceful political level; simply having those pro-democracy thoughts were enough for China to ban them due to "national security concerns". And they weren't even a new movement, but rather it was China working harder on getting Hong Kong to become more tightly integrated with the mainland.

    No matter what ones thoughts might be about these regions, and what would be best for them and/or mainland China, one can't ignore the fact that the world is keeping quiet because of nothing else than their fear/desire of Chinese capital.

    As long as the person being ethnically Chinese other countries have even been very quiet about their citizens being arrested and/or disappeared in China; like with these Hong Kong booksellers that were an inconvenience to some high-ranking Chinese political leaders: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causeway_Bay_Books_disappearances.
    magman1979StrangeDays
  • Reply 6 of 21
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,876member
    svanstrom said:
    If it hadn't been for the size of the Chinese market, as well as China's expansion into basically every market there is (especially Africa; Kenya is even about to start teaching Mandarin in all primary schools), then the world would easily have been very vocally on the side of the people wanting nothing more than a democratic say about their own lives; meaning areas like Hong Kong, Taiwan, Tibet and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

    Last year in Hong Kong the Hong Kong National Party got banned for nothing more than being pro-independence on a peaceful political level; simply having those pro-democracy thoughts were enough for China to ban them due to "national security concerns". And they weren't even a new movement, but rather it was China working harder on getting Hong Kong to become more tightly integrated with the mainland.

    No matter what ones thoughts might be about these regions, and what would be best for them and/or mainland China, one can't ignore the fact that the world is keeping quiet because of nothing else than their fear/desire of Chinese capital.

    As long as the person being ethnically Chinese other countries have even been very quiet about their citizens being arrested and/or disappeared in China; like with these Hong Kong booksellers that were an inconvenience to some high-ranking Chinese political leaders: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causeway_Bay_Books_disappearances.
    You seem to have no clear understanding of American history. Please study American Civil War first. 
    ravnorodom
  • Reply 7 of 21
    cincytee said:
    From a historical perspective, the mainland's attitude and official position are completely understandable, but I've always thought that talks about peaceful reunification would actually be far easier if they started from the acknowledgement that there are, in effect, two independent countries in play here. Is anyone remotely surprised that telling Taiwan that it's just a rebellious province that needs to come in from the cold hasn't been very helpful?
    From a historical perspective… we're essentially talking about a country that at most could be said to be 70 years old (based on the Kuomintang fleeing to Taipei in 1949). (Even being generous modern day China must be said to be no more than 108 years old; which is if one were to pinpoint it to the Xinhai revolution back in 1911-ish.)

    Modern day China's claims to regions isn't even based on their traditional lands as much as them wanting all lands that any previous dynasty controlled.

    For instance there's Tibet, which historically speaking has been an area inhabited not by Han people, but by Tibetans, Monpa, Tamang, Qiang, Sherpa, and Lhoba… But being a smaller weaker region they've either been controlled by the Han or the Mongols.

    As far as Taiwan… that's essentially a region that the "new China" (in this meaning essentially referring to the Chinese Communist Party) failed to occupy and control as they came to power. Meaning that the modern day China/the Chinese Communist Party never has ruled over Taiwan; as Taiwan is the last remnants of the Republic of China (which basically started with the Xinhai revolution, and ended when the communists took control).

    So… is it really reasonable to accept the current mainland Chinese political rulers "historical" claims to all the regions that they say currently belong to them?
    gatorguycornchiprandominternetpersonronnDeelron
  • Reply 8 of 21
    tzeshan said:
    svanstrom said:
    If it hadn't been for the size of the Chinese market, as well as China's expansion into basically every market there is (especially Africa; Kenya is even about to start teaching Mandarin in all primary schools), then the world would easily have been very vocally on the side of the people wanting nothing more than a democratic say about their own lives; meaning areas like Hong Kong, Taiwan, Tibet and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

    Last year in Hong Kong the Hong Kong National Party got banned for nothing more than being pro-independence on a peaceful political level; simply having those pro-democracy thoughts were enough for China to ban them due to "national security concerns". And they weren't even a new movement, but rather it was China working harder on getting Hong Kong to become more tightly integrated with the mainland.

    No matter what ones thoughts might be about these regions, and what would be best for them and/or mainland China, one can't ignore the fact that the world is keeping quiet because of nothing else than their fear/desire of Chinese capital.

    As long as the person being ethnically Chinese other countries have even been very quiet about their citizens being arrested and/or disappeared in China; like with these Hong Kong booksellers that were an inconvenience to some high-ranking Chinese political leaders: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causeway_Bay_Books_disappearances.
    You seem to have no clear understanding of American history. Please study American Civil War first. 
    Drop the whataboutism… This isn't about American history; this is about modern day China.
    anantksundaramentropysbonobobStrangeDaysronnDeelron
  • Reply 9 of 21
    svanstrom said:
    As long as the person being ethnically Chinese other countries have even been very quiet about their citizens being arrested and/or disappeared in China; like with these Hong Kong booksellers that were an inconvenience to some high-ranking Chinese political leaders: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causeway_Bay_Books_disappearances.
    China is not the only one. Other countries are struggling to resolve their own problems.
  • Reply 10 of 21
    tzeshan said:
    svanstrom said:
    If it hadn't been for the size of the Chinese market, as well as China's expansion into basically every market there is (especially Africa; Kenya is even about to start teaching Mandarin in all primary schools), then the world would easily have been very vocally on the side of the people wanting nothing more than a democratic say about their own lives; meaning areas like Hong Kong, Taiwan, Tibet and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

    Last year in Hong Kong the Hong Kong National Party got banned for nothing more than being pro-independence on a peaceful political level; simply having those pro-democracy thoughts were enough for China to ban them due to "national security concerns". And they weren't even a new movement, but rather it was China working harder on getting Hong Kong to become more tightly integrated with the mainland.

    No matter what ones thoughts might be about these regions, and what would be best for them and/or mainland China, one can't ignore the fact that the world is keeping quiet because of nothing else than their fear/desire of Chinese capital.

    As long as the person being ethnically Chinese other countries have even been very quiet about their citizens being arrested and/or disappeared in China; like with these Hong Kong booksellers that were an inconvenience to some high-ranking Chinese political leaders: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causeway_Bay_Books_disappearances.
    You seem to have no clear understanding of American history. Please study American Civil War first. 
    A, this is about China, not the US. B. The analyses is spot on. 
    svanstromanantksundaramentropysStrangeDaysronnDeelron
  • Reply 11 of 21
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,876member
    DAalseth said:
    tzeshan said:
    svanstrom said:
    If it hadn't been for the size of the Chinese market, as well as China's expansion into basically every market there is (especially Africa; Kenya is even about to start teaching Mandarin in all primary schools), then the world would easily have been very vocally on the side of the people wanting nothing more than a democratic say about their own lives; meaning areas like Hong Kong, Taiwan, Tibet and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

    Last year in Hong Kong the Hong Kong National Party got banned for nothing more than being pro-independence on a peaceful political level; simply having those pro-democracy thoughts were enough for China to ban them due to "national security concerns". And they weren't even a new movement, but rather it was China working harder on getting Hong Kong to become more tightly integrated with the mainland.

    No matter what ones thoughts might be about these regions, and what would be best for them and/or mainland China, one can't ignore the fact that the world is keeping quiet because of nothing else than their fear/desire of Chinese capital.

    As long as the person being ethnically Chinese other countries have even been very quiet about their citizens being arrested and/or disappeared in China; like with these Hong Kong booksellers that were an inconvenience to some high-ranking Chinese political leaders: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causeway_Bay_Books_disappearances.
    You seem to have no clear understanding of American history. Please study American Civil War first. 
    A, this is about China, not the US. B. The analyses is spot on. 
    Again, you seem not listening to what US VP Pence said yesterday. He said China is not following international standards. I think he means international standards led by US. There is nothing wrong talking about US. 
  • Reply 12 of 21
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,434member
    "Think Tank"?  Yeah right... the only thing that think-tank does is spend its time thinking how to rip off more IP than it currently does.

    What a joke.

    The biggest regret China will have is the day it tries taking over Taiwan.  
    anantksundaramcornchipravnorodom
  • Reply 13 of 21
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,650member
    “Think” Tank? Sounds like just the opposite. Ministry of Correct Think maybe. 1984. 
    Trump should put a 25% Tariff on everything made in China.   And then raise it another 25% each year.
  • Reply 14 of 21
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,876member
    k2kw said:
    “Think” Tank? Sounds like just the opposite. Ministry of Correct Think maybe. 1984. 
    Trump should put a 25% Tariff on everything made in China.   And then raise it another 25% each year.
    If you truly believe in yourself, you should throw out all your things that are made in China. The iPhone is made in China. 
  • Reply 15 of 21
    tzeshan said:
    k2kw said:
    “Think” Tank? Sounds like just the opposite. Ministry of Correct Think maybe. 1984. 
    Trump should put a 25% Tariff on everything made in China.   And then raise it another 25% each year.
    If you truly believe in yourself, you should throw out all your things that are made in China. The iPhone is made in China. 
    How much of the value-added of the iPhone is from China?

    The iPhone is assembled there. That doesn’t necessarily mean “made” there, since assembly is a pretty low value-added activity (especially given the abundantly available cheap Chinese labor). 
    edited January 17 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 16 of 21
    entropysentropys Posts: 1,566member
    tzeshan said:
    k2kw said:
    “Think” Tank? Sounds like just the opposite. Ministry of Correct Think maybe. 1984. 
    Trump should put a 25% Tariff on everything made in China.   And then raise it another 25% each year.
    If you truly believe in yourself, you should throw out all your things that are made in China. The iPhone is made in China. 
    How much of the value-added of the iPhone is from China?

    The iPhone is assembled there. That doesn’t necessarily mean “made” there, since assembly is a pretty low value-added activity (especially given the abundantly available cheap Chinese labor). 
    If so, it wouldn’t cost much to make in another country. Yet here we are. The truth is there has been a long term strategy to be the manufacturing powerhouse of the world. It is pen t about labour price so much, as wages are lower than China in plenty of places.
    Meanwhile first world countries chased the services industries, which somehow morphed into being more and more dependent on tax dollars through government contracts.  Tax dollars from future tax payers.  It won’t end well.
  • Reply 17 of 21
    Cultural imperialism.
  • Reply 18 of 21
    entropys said:
    tzeshan said:
    k2kw said:
    “Think” Tank? Sounds like just the opposite. Ministry of Correct Think maybe. 1984. 
    Trump should put a 25% Tariff on everything made in China.   And then raise it another 25% each year.
    If you truly believe in yourself, you should throw out all your things that are made in China. The iPhone is made in China. 
    How much of the value-added of the iPhone is from China?

    The iPhone is assembled there. That doesn’t necessarily mean “made” there, since assembly is a pretty low value-added activity (especially given the abundantly available cheap Chinese labor). 
    If so, it wouldn’t cost much to make in another country. Yet here we are. The truth is there has been a long term strategy to be the manufacturing powerhouse of the world. It is pen t about labour price so much, as wages are lower than China in plenty of places.
    Meanwhile first world countries chased the services industries, which somehow morphed into being more and more dependent on tax dollars through government contracts.  Tax dollars from future tax payers.  It won’t end well.
    That’s not what I said. You’re confusing issues of cost with scale and efficiency. China does offer the latter. 

    The whole thing cannot move overnight, but it’s starting to. The next few years are probably going to see a major retooling of the global manufacturing supply chain. 

    As to your second para, I don’t follow what your saying. 
    SpamSandwich
  • Reply 19 of 21
    tzeshan said:
    svanstrom said:
    If it hadn't been for the size of the Chinese market, as well as China's expansion into basically every market there is (especially Africa; Kenya is even about to start teaching Mandarin in all primary schools), then the world would easily have been very vocally on the side of the people wanting nothing more than a democratic say about their own lives; meaning areas like Hong Kong, Taiwan, Tibet and the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

    Last year in Hong Kong the Hong Kong National Party got banned for nothing more than being pro-independence on a peaceful political level; simply having those pro-democracy thoughts were enough for China to ban them due to "national security concerns". And they weren't even a new movement, but rather it was China working harder on getting Hong Kong to become more tightly integrated with the mainland.

    No matter what ones thoughts might be about these regions, and what would be best for them and/or mainland China, one can't ignore the fact that the world is keeping quiet because of nothing else than their fear/desire of Chinese capital.

    As long as the person being ethnically Chinese other countries have even been very quiet about their citizens being arrested and/or disappeared in China; like with these Hong Kong booksellers that were an inconvenience to some high-ranking Chinese political leaders: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Causeway_Bay_Books_disappearances.
    You seem to have no clear understanding of American history. Please study American Civil War first. 
    I'm pretty sure that if the South had won their independence from the US in the 1860s no one would be pretending in the 1930s that there was only one USA and the CSA is just a "rogue province."  Or perhaps the US is a "rogue province" still of the British Empire?  At some point (and 20 years seems like a good upper limit), one needs to acknowledge the reality on the ground.  
    ronn
  • Reply 20 of 21
    ivanhivanh Posts: 287member
    Hong Kong?  No more soon.  There only will be a "xiāng gǎng", and a bigger region (Big Bay Area) called "da wan qu".  By 2047, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) may have changed Hong Kong's common law to Chinese-Communist-Party-style-common-law and da wan qu xiāng gǎng ( Big Bay Area Hong Kong) may have to use a new CCP-invented Chinese-romanization-style standard English, like  "xiāng gǎng de yīng wén yào quán miàn hàn yǔ pīn yīn huà" and require the whole world to learn it, like asking the Canadians to learn the laws of (mainland) China.
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