Microsoft is the Official Laptop sponsor of Super Bowl LIII -- with a tablet

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 31
    thedbathedba Posts: 472member
    It’s actually quite funny when the head coach of one of the finalists, wants nothing to do with them. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 31
    maestro64maestro64 Posts: 4,476member
    sflocal said:
    I’m actually surprised Microsoft wants to go there after the prior NFL drama with its Surface.

    It must have paid a lot of money!

    https://youtu.be/wyhjUFcXgo0
    It just go to show the NFL will do anything for money they are the biggest hoes around, they will pimp themselves out for any thing. This is why their rating have been in the hole and viewership has been way down, there is no honor or integrity in the organization. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 31
    danvmdanvm Posts: 711member
    thedba said:
    danvm said:
    MplsP said:
    Well, to be fair, several weeks ago, Apple put out an ad saying the iPad Pro should be your 'next computer,' so Microsoft's not the only one blurring the lines. In reality, the lines have been getting more and more blurred for the past several years. Maybe we should start calling them 'tabtops' or 'laplets?'
    It’s never been in dispute that iPads and tablets are sub-categories of “computer”. They are computers. Of course they’re computers. That doesn’t mean they’re blurring the lines between what is a laptop and what is a tablet in the way this article discusses. 
    Forgot to mention that.

    The surface is confused. It doesn't know what it is and who wants it.
    I don't think the Surface is confusing.  You use it as a PC / notebook with a keyboard w/ trackpad attached, and detach the keyboard and use it as a tablet.

    What is confusing is Apple message.  They tell you that touchscreen notebooks have a bad ergonomic experience because the screen in vertical position  But at the same time they push the iPad Pro + Smart Keyboard as a desktop replacement, and you have to use it in the same way as a touchscreen notebook.  They should be more clear in what position they are with touchscreen devices.
    The problem with the Surface as a tablet paradigm, is that as soon as MS decided to put desktop Windows on it, developers never bothered writing software with touch in mind. Most have taken the path of least resistance. Not to mention users whom the vast majority go with what they’re already familiar with. Keyboard and mouse.

    The iPad on the other hand, was born as tablet and software written for it is touch first. Adding a keyboard or Pencil to an iPad is a bonus, not a must.
    I agree with you with your post on developers.  But I don't see developers doing something different if MS had choose to force an touch UI in the Surface.  Most of the time they just follow customers.  Another example is how developers have not develop for macOS, and still focus on Windows in the desktop.  I would love to see more developers working native apps for Windows 10 and macOS. 

    I don't see keyboard and mouse as a bonus, but as input devices that enhance an experience.  If I want to browse the internet, use social apps or watch movies in Netflix, then a keyboard and / or Pencil is a bonus.  And both, Surface and iPad provide a very nice experience.  But more complex tasks, as working in large spreadsheets, long documents, drawing, PDF annotation, among others, then the keyboard and Pen / Pencil is a must if you want the best experience.  And maybe that's the reason people use the keyboard + trackpad in the Surface while in the iPad they move to their Mac / PC to complete their tasks. 
    edited February 1 GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 24 of 31
    The Surface is (by design, its strengths, and its weaknesses) more like a laptop than an iPad is.  I see a few people using Surfaces at work and they all use them like laptops, never without the keyboard.  Other people use their personal MacBooks or their work-assigned Dell notebooks.  I don't have a problem putting them all in the laptop category.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 31
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,125member
    The Surface is (by design, its strengths, and its weaknesses) more like a laptop than an iPad is.  I see a few people using Surfaces at work and they all use them like laptops, never without the keyboard.  Other people use their personal MacBooks or their work-assigned Dell notebooks.  I don't have a problem putting them all in the laptop category.
    Is that because of the Surface?   Or a function of the type of work they are doing -- where an external keyboard and mouse are better suited than a tablet/touch interface?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 31
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,771member
    Hybrid device sometimes gets called one thing, sometimes another.  Shocker.
  • Reply 27 of 31
    gutengel said:
    Wasn't Microsoft complaining a couple years ago about being the sponsors with the Surface, but the trainer and technicians ended up using iPads because they worked better?
    Usually the people paid to use the surface use iPads behind their backs.

    Anyone remember when Microsoft paid a news network to use Surface and they used them as iPad stands instead?
    I’m being totally anecdotal here: I was a two mini IT security conferences this week and took a look around at what people were using and I could count 5 Surfaces for every iPad. I notice similar ratios at airports and on planes, when I travel. 

    A colleague of mine replaced her work-supplied notebook with a Surface Pro. When I asked her why, she told me that she loved the size and profitability coupled with the fact that when at her desk, she could dock it and have a fully fledged computer with multiple monitors. There is a perception (not without justification) that doing things like sharing data is difficult with an iPad. If your workflow resides within one app in iOS, the iPad is a marvel, but as soon as you have to share data with people or between apps, the ease of use of the iPad drops dramatically. 

    I *love* my iPad Pro, but there is no way in hell that I could use it exclusively. If I had to choose just one device, I’d have to go with a notebook computer. The Surface (Pro) makes that choice a no-brainer for a lot of people, and those I speak with are not unhappy with them; they love them. Based on what I’ve seen, in the business world, MS is killing it with the Surface. 
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 28 of 31
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 4,125member
    gutengel said:
    Wasn't Microsoft complaining a couple years ago about being the sponsors with the Surface, but the trainer and technicians ended up using iPads because they worked better?
    Usually the people paid to use the surface use iPads behind their backs.

    Anyone remember when Microsoft paid a news network to use Surface and they used them as iPad stands instead?
    I’m being totally anecdotal here: I was a two mini IT security conferences this week and took a look around at what people were using and I could count 5 Surfaces for every iPad. I notice similar ratios at airports and on planes, when I travel. 

    A colleague of mine replaced her work-supplied notebook with a Surface Pro. When I asked her why, she told me that she loved the size and profitability coupled with the fact that when at her desk, she could dock it and have a fully fledged computer with multiple monitors. There is a perception (not without justification) that doing things like sharing data is difficult with an iPad. If your workflow resides within one app in iOS, the iPad is a marvel, but as soon as you have to share data with people or between apps, the ease of use of the iPad drops dramatically. 

    I *love* my iPad Pro, but there is no way in hell that I could use it exclusively. If I had to choose just one device, I’d have to go with a notebook computer. The Surface (Pro) makes that choice a no-brainer for a lot of people, and those I speak with are not unhappy with them; they love them. Based on what I’ve seen, in the business world, MS is killing it with the Surface. 
    It seems that Apple has conceded that entire market -- even though it is many times larger than its target market of the artsy types and students.

    I don't get it.   Why would they do that?
  • Reply 29 of 31
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,339administrator
    gutengel said:
    Wasn't Microsoft complaining a couple years ago about being the sponsors with the Surface, but the trainer and technicians ended up using iPads because they worked better?
    Usually the people paid to use the surface use iPads behind their backs.

    Anyone remember when Microsoft paid a news network to use Surface and they used them as iPad stands instead?
    I’m being totally anecdotal here: I was a two mini IT security conferences this week and took a look around at what people were using and I could count 5 Surfaces for every iPad. I notice similar ratios at airports and on planes, when I travel. 

    A colleague of mine replaced her work-supplied notebook with a Surface Pro. When I asked her why, she told me that she loved the size and profitability coupled with the fact that when at her desk, she could dock it and have a fully fledged computer with multiple monitors. There is a perception (not without justification) that doing things like sharing data is difficult with an iPad. If your workflow resides within one app in iOS, the iPad is a marvel, but as soon as you have to share data with people or between apps, the ease of use of the iPad drops dramatically. 

    I *love* my iPad Pro, but there is no way in hell that I could use it exclusively. If I had to choose just one device, I’d have to go with a notebook computer. The Surface (Pro) makes that choice a no-brainer for a lot of people, and those I speak with are not unhappy with them; they love them. Based on what I’ve seen, in the business world, MS is killing it with the Surface. 
    It seems that Apple has conceded that entire market -- even though it is many times larger than its target market of the artsy types and students.

    I don't get it.   Why would they do that?
    They haven’t. You don’t have to look farther than the deals with Deloitte et al to see that they haven’t ceded anything of the sort.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 31
    gutengel said:
    Wasn't Microsoft complaining a couple years ago about being the sponsors with the Surface, but the trainer and technicians ended up using iPads because they worked better?
    Usually the people paid to use the surface use iPads behind their backs.

    Anyone remember when Microsoft paid a news network to use Surface and they used them as iPad stands instead?
    I’m being totally anecdotal here: I was a two mini IT security conferences this week and took a look around at what people were using and I could count 5 Surfaces for every iPad. I notice similar ratios at airports and on planes, when I travel. 

    A colleague of mine replaced her work-supplied notebook with a Surface Pro. When I asked her why, she told me that she loved the size and profitability coupled with the fact that when at her desk, she could dock it and have a fully fledged computer with multiple monitors. There is a perception (not without justification) that doing things like sharing data is difficult with an iPad. If your workflow resides within one app in iOS, the iPad is a marvel, but as soon as you have to share data with people or between apps, the ease of use of the iPad drops dramatically. 

    I *love* my iPad Pro, but there is no way in hell that I could use it exclusively. If I had to choose just one device, I’d have to go with a notebook computer. The Surface (Pro) makes that choice a no-brainer for a lot of people, and those I speak with are not unhappy with them; they love them. Based on what I’ve seen, in the business world, MS is killing it with the Surface. 
    It seems that Apple has conceded that entire market -- even though it is many times larger than its target market of the artsy types and students.

    I don't get it.   Why would they do that?
    They haven’t. You don’t have to look farther than the deals with Deloitte et al to see that they haven’t ceded anything of the sort.
    I was in a large corporate market for many years -- both in Accounting (10 years) and IT (20 years).   I don't see too much attractive there from Apple to serve the needs of an enterprise solution or an office type person -- particularly if you do a cost/benefit analysis.  (Although their mobile products could serve some peripheral purposes).   I have no idea what Deloitte could see in them.  That's not to trash Apple, just to point out that they target their products to a different market.

    Admittedly I worked for some pretty hard nosed operations (quality, but no nonsense) so I'm kind of biased now in how they did things.  They typically had only two questions with purchases:   "Will it do the job?"  and, "How much will it cost?"  Just, totally logical, functional assessments -- think Mr Spock.

    I was hopeful when they announced a connection to IBM a while back, I see a lot of potential symbioses there.   But I'm not aware of anything that came out of it.
  • Reply 31 of 31
    MplsP said:
    Well, to be fair, several weeks ago, Apple put out an ad saying the iPad Pro should be your 'next computer,' so Microsoft's not the only one blurring the lines. In reality, the lines have been getting more 
    /FileZilla /Malwarebytes Rufus
    and more blurred for the past several years. Maybe we should start calling them 'tabtops' or 'laplets?'
    It’s never been in dispute that iPads and tablets are sub-categories of “computer”. They are computers. Of course they’re computers. That doesn’t mean they’re blurring the lines between what is a laptop and what is a tablet in the way this article discusses. 
    Microsoft's latest Super Bowl campaign calls the Surface a laptop, but the company shifts definitions of what it is when it suits them. It's always been very careful to compare its tablets against Apple's h/Malwarebytes laptops whenever possible, for instance]bu/FileZilla /Rufus that's gone now Microsoft has seemingly decided the NFL audience is more likely to buy a laptop. 
    edited March 25
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