Apple crime blotter: Roger Stone's iCloud, a Siri school shooting threat, and Find My iPho...

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 7
Roger Stone is a big Apple user -- and that may be a problem for him, given that Apple has handed over data from his iCloud account in accordance with a warrant. That and more, in the latest Apple-related crime roundup.

A man in handcuffs (image courtesy of Pixabay)
A man in handcuffs (image courtesy of Pixabay)


The latest in an occasional series at AppleInsider: A round-up of Apple-related crime.

Mueller has evidence from Roger Stone's iCloud account

Following former Trump campaign advisor Roger Stone's arrest last week, the office of Special Counsel Robert Mueller said Thursday that it has obtained numerous electronic devices belonging to Stone, as well as access to his iCloud account. The evidence collected, per CNN, includes "multiple hard drives containing several terabytes of information consisting of, among other things, FBI case reports, search warrant applications and results (e.g., Apple iCloud accounts and email accounts)." Also included in the evidence are bank accounts and the hard drives of the devices themselves.

Another former Trump adviser, Paul Manafort also had evidence from his iCloud account lead to major legal trouble in connection with the Mueller investigation. Stone and Manafort were business partners for a time in the '80s.

The information provided on Stone is the same type of information that Apple provided from the San Bernardino shooter's device from 2016 after a warrant was served. Unlike the San Bernardino iPhone 5C, a device unlock has not been requested for Stone's devices, nor has one been performed.

Teenager used Siri to threaten school shooting

A 13-year-old boy in Valparaiso, Ind., was arrested and charged with intimidation after he allegedly told Siri on his iPhone that he planned to carry out a school shooting. According to the Associated Press, the student also posted an iPhone screenshot of the reaction to the threat.

The boy had told Siri "I am going to shoot up a school," at which point the digital assistant produced a list of nearby schools, which he then posted.

Find My iPhone Used To Locate Abducted Woman

After a woman in Boston was abducted from a bar last month, her sister was able to locate her by using Find My iPhone. According to Radar Online, when Olivia Ambrose went missing, her sister tracked her iPhone, eventually helping police track down the missing woman.

Beekeeper offers a year's supply of honey as reward for stolen iPad

A beekeeper, known as "Beeman," who lives on the West Indies island of Nevis is offering a year's supply of honey for the safe return of his stolen iPad. According to the St. Kitts Nevis Observer, the man's iPad was stolen from his home in December.

Beeman, whose real name is Quentin Henderson, lost countless family photos as a result of the theft, as well as the ability to communicate with friends and family in his native England. In addition to the honey, Henderson is offering $200 in cash.

Apple subpoena leads to theft charge

Police in College Station, Tex., successfully subpoenaed Apple to obtain the name of the owner of a stolen iPhone. According to KBTX, police had arrested a 19-year-old man for selling stolen iPhones, and then subpoenaed Apple in order to obtain the name.

Apple complied with the subpoena, which led to an additional charge against the accused thief.

Dad live-tweets six-day search for stolen iPad

A man in England spent six days last week tracking the movements of his stolen iPad via Find My iPhone. According to The Sun, the man followed the device through churches, bars, and other locations in London over the course of nearly a week.

Throughout, he live-tweeted maps of where the phone was, until he and a friend finally confronted the alleged thief -- a homeless man who appeared confused about the situation.

New York man arrested in iPhone scam

A man has been arrested in Central Pennsylvania, after which he admitted that he carried out a scam in which he purchased multiple iPhones by giving fraudulent information to UPS drivers. According to Centre Daily, the New York resident opened false Sprint accounts and bought iPhones in their name.

The thefts cost Sprint $200,000, the newspaper said.

Two charged with stealing iPads from school

A pair of teenagers have been charged with stealing 19 iPads and a MacBook from an elementary school in New Jersey. According to The Vineland Daily Journal the two suspects, who are 16 and 19 years old, were charged with burglary and conspiracy to commit burglary, while the 19-year-old was also charged with employing a juvenile in the commission of a crime.

The stolen equipment has not been recovered.

Women accused of drugging men in Miami clubs to steal iPhones

Two women were arrested in late January and charged with carrying out a scheme in which they met men in Miami Beach nightspots, took them back to hotel rooms, drugged them, and then stole their iPhones and expensive watches. According to NBC Miami, the women were arrested together in a car with the drug GHB in their possession, and have been hit with grand theft, burglary and drug charges.

One of the women, the TV station said, was "involved in a similar case from last year."

Have a crime story for us? Email AppleInsider and tell us about it.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 40
    Apple needs to encrypt iCloud just like they encrypt the iPhone.  They are only a storage facility and don’t have access to the key to decrypt iCloud storage. 
  • Reply 2 of 40
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,196administrator
    As a reminder, we didn't make this post political, and neither will you. Keep your manifestos, conspiracy theories, or celebrations to yourself. Apple compiles with warrants and court orders to the best of their ability, regardless of who the subject is.

    Do not interpret this remark as an invitation for debate on the subject.
    edited February 3 DAalsethMplsPtommikeleravnorodomnapoleon_phoneapartDeelronbeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 3 of 40
    As a reminder, we didn't make this post political, and neither will you. Keep your manifestos, conspiracy theories, or celebrations to yourself. Apple compiles with warrants and court orders to the best of their ability, regardless of who the subject is.

    Do not interpret this remark as an invitation for debate on the subject.
    Appreciate your efforts to keep things civil. I don't think its trivial effort on your part.
  • Reply 4 of 40
    tedz98 said:
    Apple needs to encrypt iCloud just like they encrypt the iPhone.  They are only a storage facility and don’t have access to the key to decrypt iCloud storage. 
    There are many reasons apple cannot keep encrypted backups. If you forget your password there is no ‘recovery’ that can be done by resetting your password. So regular joe would lose all his photos & backup. If you want encrypted backup the service ‘MEGA’ does offer encrypted backup(50GB free) .
    Backups are always a balance between security & convenience. 
    If you want to secure your data on iOS I would suggest doing encrypted backups on ITunes.
  • Reply 5 of 40
    Apple was very quick to comply with the demands of the Mueller investigation, and yet they refused to assist the FBI in obtaining access to the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter, even under court order. Interesting...
    fastbagger
  • Reply 6 of 40
    As a reminder, we didn't make this post political, and neither will you. Keep your manifestos, conspiracy theories, or celebrations to yourself. Apple compiles with warrants and court orders to the best of their ability, regardless of who the subject is.

    Do not interpret this remark as an invitation for debate on the subject.
    I agree. But „...and neither will you“ is rather an aggressive way to write. I as a reader cannot feel other then slightly offended. 
    stantheman
  • Reply 7 of 40
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,758member
    Apple was very quick to comply with the demands of the Mueller investigation, and yet they refused to assist the FBI in obtaining access to the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter, even under court order. Interesting...
    Not interesting at all...those are 2 totally different things. 
    larryaDeelronstanthemanbeowulfschmidtStrangeDaysjony0
  • Reply 8 of 40
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 4,758member

    As a reminder, we didn't make this post political, and neither will you. Keep your manifestos, conspiracy theories, or celebrations to yourself. Apple compiles with warrants and court orders to the best of their ability, regardless of who the subject is.

    Do not interpret this remark as an invitation for debate on the subject.
    I agree. But „...and neither will you“ is rather an aggressive way to write. I as a reader cannot feel other then slightly offended. 
    Give me a break....
    tommikelejony0
  • Reply 9 of 40
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,196administrator
    As a reminder, we didn't make this post political, and neither will you. Keep your manifestos, conspiracy theories, or celebrations to yourself. Apple compiles with warrants and court orders to the best of their ability, regardless of who the subject is.

    Do not interpret this remark as an invitation for debate on the subject.
    I agree. But „...and neither will you“ is rather an aggressive way to write. I as a reader cannot feel other then slightly offended. 
    It is intentionally aggressive, and I'm really not bothered by your slight offense taken.

    We have rules. They will be followed.
    edited February 3 tommikelemacxpresslarryabeowulfschmidtsteveaujony0
  • Reply 10 of 40
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,196administrator

    Apple was very quick to comply with the demands of the Mueller investigation, and yet they refused to assist the FBI in obtaining access to the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter, even under court order. Interesting...
    Your statement lacks a basis in fact. The FBI botched the handling of the device in question, and Apple immediately complied with the court order, when it was ultimately served.

    A device unlock is not the same as complying with an iCloud warrant. Apple did in fact comply with the iCloud warrant in the case of the San Bernardino shooter. Feel free to educate yourself on the facts of the case at your earliest convenience.
    edited February 3 MplsPtommikelemacxpressLee6502old4funlarryamwhiteDeelronstanthemanbeowulfschmidt
  • Reply 11 of 40
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,425member
    I agree. But „...and neither will you“ is rather an aggressive way to write. I as a reader cannot feel other then slightly offended. 
    And your offense offends me.  Would you like a participation trophy?

    I enjoy these AI articles.  If anything, one never really hears about similar types of crimes involving Android. :)
    StrangeDays
  • Reply 12 of 40
    Apple was very quick to comply with the demands of the Mueller investigation, and yet they refused to assist the FBI in obtaining access to the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter, even under court order. Interesting...
    Completely incorrect. Apple was quick to the assist the FBI from the cloud side, but would not produce a tool to hack into a locally locked, encrypted iPhone. There was no court order that mandated they do so. You made that up.
    edited February 3 mwhitestantheman
  • Reply 13 of 40
    Apple was very quick to comply with the demands of the Mueller investigation, and yet they refused to assist the FBI in obtaining access to the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter, even under court order. Interesting...
    Completely incorrect. Apple was quick to the assist the FBI from the cloud side, but would not produce a tool to hack into a locally locked, encrypted iPhone. There was no court order that mandated they do so. You made that up.
    Yes there was a court order. The FBI asked Apple to create a backdoor. Apple refused. The FBI went to court and Judge Sheri Pym issued a court order compelling Apple to create software to access Farook's phone. Apple resisted and a hearing was scheduled, but it was cancelled when the FBI found its own way into the phone.

    EDIT: That doesn't change the fact that the OP is confused about the difference between an order to unlock a device vs. granting access to material stored on iCloud. Apple readily responds to subpoenas and warrants for the latter.
    edited February 3 christ_chan
  • Reply 14 of 40
    The Siri response is what I despise the most about Siri and its disappointing that Apple continues to be so far behind. 95% of the Siri-fails leaves me feeling so... damn... frustrated, especially when they are back to back, and/or repeated failures.

    I dont know how to get the feedback to Apple that Siri’s responses are woefully inaccurate, inadequate, and just flat out wrong.  And that’s equally annoying.

    At a minimum there should be a check against Siri’s response and what was asked.  A simple “I didn’t understand...” or “Sorry, I dont have the answer you need...(but ill find out and let you know later)” would be dramatic improvements). 
  • Reply 15 of 40
    mfrydmfryd Posts: 112member
    Apple was very quick to comply with the demands of the Mueller investigation, and yet they refused to assist the FBI in obtaining access to the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter, even under court order. Interesting...
    Mueller had a court order asking Apple to provide access to an iCloud account. Essential the court order was for Apple to reset the password for the account. This is something they do in the normal course of business for account owners. In the case of the San Bernardino shooter, the FBI wanted Apple to develop new technology to circumvent the security of their devices. This is not the same thing. Imagine if the Acme Safe company sold an "uncrackable" safe. Their marketing material claimed that without the combination, the safe could not be opened without destroying the contents. Would it be reasonable for the FBI to demand that the Acme safe company figure out how to bypass the security and crack a safe for the FBI?
  • Reply 16 of 40
    Apple was very quick to comply with the demands of the Mueller investigation, and yet they refused to assist the FBI in obtaining access to the iPhone of the San Bernardino shooter, even under court order. Interesting...
    And here we go....
  • Reply 17 of 40
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 1,105member
    "The boy had told Siri "I am going to shoot up a school," at which point the digital assistant produced a list of nearby schools"

    Proof that Siri's artificial intelligence has a ways to go...
  • Reply 18 of 40
    linkmanlinkman Posts: 881member
    I wish the article about the Sprint loss had more information. There's a big unexplained gap between the $6000 for the eight XRs and the $200,000 Sprint lost from the thefts.
  • Reply 19 of 40
    Lee650Lee650 Posts: 1unconfirmed, member
    my opinion is it's fully encrypted end to end and used by so many. The downfall of course is thay if either user you're engaged in a vinverconver with backs up their messages to iCloud then those messages can be decrypted by Apple. As an Android user there is not a widely used application that offers that. I'm so tired of Asking family and friends to switch to something new.

    Google automatically backs up some of your phone data like SMS messages (Pixel only) and call history, to the cloud. That way, if you need to wipe your device or it gets lost/stolen, you're not completely out of luck. Android Pie includes changes to how these backups are stored, so not even Google can read your data! This is a definite big benefit!

    In the company's online security blog, Google revealed that "devices can take advantage of a new capability where backed-up application data can only be decrypted by a key that is randomly generated at the client." The key is based on the user's lock screen password, which isn't known by Google. The data is then stored on a Titan Security Module on one of Google's servers, which permanently blocks access after too many failed attempts

    edited February 3
  • Reply 20 of 40
    Good old Comcast ... as usual, they could not care less about their customers. To call it easy to create the app that will run on TV OS or any other platform would be too generous. It's an easy code writing exercise. The real reason, as we all already know, is MONEY and some exclusivity deal Comcast entered into with Roku. They probably get a cut that they think will help them replace revenue lost from rental of current cable boxes. Comcast just pissed on at least ⅓ of their customer base. The vast majority of their base bears little resemblance to those of us who follow tech news and read articles and comment here. They bought an AppleTV to go along with all their other Apple gear and will not be happy and are unlikely to buy a Roku unit.
    As a reminder, we didn't make this post political, and neither will you. Keep your manifestos, conspiracy theories, or celebrations to yourself. Apple compiles with warrants and court orders to the best of their ability, regardless of who the subject is.

    Do not interpret this remark as an invitation for debate on the subject.
    I agree. But „...and neither will you“ is rather an aggressive way to write. I as a reader cannot feel other then slightly offended. 
    You are "slightly offended?" Get over it.
    StrangeDays
This discussion has been closed.