Huawei's debuts $2,600 foldable Mate X, hits new smartphone price record

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  • Reply 81 of 118
    tzeshan said:

    With this announcement it is important to realize that not only is Trump walking back his allegations that Huawei is a security concern, but most of Europe is now challenging his claims.   In fact, Great Britian's head of intelligence just issued an ultimatum to Trump to "Put up (the evidence) or shut up".
    You're confusing the Trump executive administration with the US intelligence community; agencies which Trump does not like.

    Did you ever see the evidence that Putin and the Russians hacked the DNC email and meddled in our election? Nope. But you accept that they did.
    Good point.   Or, it would be if it were applicable.   It is not the U.S. intelligence community who made the allegations of spying against Huawei, it was Trump.   And, not only is the rest of the world starting to question those allegations, but Trump is starting to walk them back.
    Incorrect. Six US intelligence agencies, which debriefed US senators. The same agencies Trump decries for their comments about him. There is no way Trump controls these six agencies and made them fake their conclusions. 

    “Don’t use Huawei phones, say heads of FBI, CIA, and NSA”

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/14/17011246/huawei-phones-safe-us-intelligence-chief-fears

    US Senators: “Huawei is effectively an arm of the Chinese government”

    https://www.cio.com.au/article/633134/huawei-effectively-an-arm-chinese-government-us-senator/

    ...so if you believed them when they said Russia helped Trump win, I want to know why you choose not to believe them now. Other than confirmation bias, of course. 
    There is single correct reason they would not tell you or the world. Using Huawei equipment will pose great difficulty for US spy agencies to install back doors. 
    And using them will pose great opportunity for China to do the same. I’ll go with the democratic republic over the totalitarian regime, thanks. 
    edited February 25 tmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 82 of 118
    kevin keekevin kee Posts: 1,048member
    tzeshan said:
    I think every Apple fans agree that if Apple make a foldable iPhone it will use a different design not just a copycat. And in a couple years Samsung and Huawei will change their foldable to look exactly like Apple's design. Case in point. Apple removed the 3.5 mm jack in iPhone 7. Apple was ridiculed by Google and the media. Now after two years Google Pixel 3, Samsung Galaxy S10s and Fold, Huawei Mate X all removed the 3.5 mm jack. The media ridiculed Apple in order to give the Android copycats time to implement so Apple will not grab bigger pie. 
    I don't see media ridicule Samsung nor Huawei to come out with this ridiculous foldable design though. They only do that to iPhone.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 83 of 118
    tzeshan said:

    With this announcement it is important to realize that not only is Trump walking back his allegations that Huawei is a security concern, but most of Europe is now challenging his claims.   In fact, Great Britian's head of intelligence just issued an ultimatum to Trump to "Put up (the evidence) or shut up".
    You're confusing the Trump executive administration with the US intelligence community; agencies which Trump does not like.

    Did you ever see the evidence that Putin and the Russians hacked the DNC email and meddled in our election? Nope. But you accept that they did.
    Good point.   Or, it would be if it were applicable.   It is not the U.S. intelligence community who made the allegations of spying against Huawei, it was Trump.   And, not only is the rest of the world starting to question those allegations, but Trump is starting to walk them back.
    Incorrect. Six US intelligence agencies, which debriefed US senators. The same agencies Trump decries for their comments about him. There is no way Trump controls these six agencies and made them fake their conclusions. 

    “Don’t use Huawei phones, say heads of FBI, CIA, and NSA”

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/14/17011246/huawei-phones-safe-us-intelligence-chief-fears

    US Senators: “Huawei is effectively an arm of the Chinese government”

    https://www.cio.com.au/article/633134/huawei-effectively-an-arm-chinese-government-us-senator/

    ...so if you believed them when they said Russia helped Trump win, I want to know why you choose not to believe them now. Other than confirmation bias, of course. 
    There is single correct reason they would not tell you or the world. Using Huawei equipment will pose great difficulty for US spy agencies to install back doors. 
    And using them will pose great opportunity for China to do the same. I’ll go with the democratic republic over the totalitarian regime, thanks. 
    The US is not a “democratic republic.”  The word democracy does not appear in any of our founding documents, and our Founders only used the word democracy in a negative light. We are a Constiutional Representative Republic. Sorry to be nit picky, but it’s annoying that people refer to our government as a democracy when our Founders knew how dangerous it is and specifically set up our government to avoid it. 
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 84 of 118
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 1,996member
    tzeshan said:

    With this announcement it is important to realize that not only is Trump walking back his allegations that Huawei is a security concern, but most of Europe is now challenging his claims.   In fact, Great Britian's head of intelligence just issued an ultimatum to Trump to "Put up (the evidence) or shut up".
    You're confusing the Trump executive administration with the US intelligence community; agencies which Trump does not like.

    Did you ever see the evidence that Putin and the Russians hacked the DNC email and meddled in our election? Nope. But you accept that they did.
    Good point.   Or, it would be if it were applicable.   It is not the U.S. intelligence community who made the allegations of spying against Huawei, it was Trump.   And, not only is the rest of the world starting to question those allegations, but Trump is starting to walk them back.
    Incorrect. Six US intelligence agencies, which debriefed US senators. The same agencies Trump decries for their comments about him. There is no way Trump controls these six agencies and made them fake their conclusions. 

    “Don’t use Huawei phones, say heads of FBI, CIA, and NSA”

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/14/17011246/huawei-phones-safe-us-intelligence-chief-fears

    US Senators: “Huawei is effectively an arm of the Chinese government”

    https://www.cio.com.au/article/633134/huawei-effectively-an-arm-chinese-government-us-senator/

    ...so if you believed them when they said Russia helped Trump win, I want to know why you choose not to believe them now. Other than confirmation bias, of course. 
    There is single correct reason they would not tell you or the world. Using Huawei equipment will pose great difficulty for US spy agencies to install back doors. 
    And using them will pose great opportunity for China to do the same. I’ll go with the democratic republic over the totalitarian regime, thanks. 
    I cannot argue with delusional person on this issue.  ;-)
  • Reply 85 of 118
    Soli said:
    maestro64 said:
    I see we are in the race to see who can make the most expensive folding phone. It reminds me when flip phones were the rage and everyone was trying to figure out the next best flip style phones and Motorola came up with this $1500 solution. Yeah it did not sell well, but it is was one of the first circular displays with a sapphire crystal. 

    I personally do not know what you do with a square display, that is so 1970's.



    It like going to the Detroit Auto show, all the car companies show off products which they tell us are the future but they never come out as product, if they do come out people do not buy since they cost too much.
    Remember when Nokia was trying to be "innovative" with cheap, futuristic looking designs?


    I loved browsing the Nokia site to see their phone designs. All of these were actually on sale! They even had a model that had felt trimmings.

    I was very keen on getting the first version of the N-gage. Then the entire fiasco of having to use the phone sideways to make calls, making it look like you had an elephant's ear, put me off.

    N-gage as a gaming platform then crashed and burnt soon after v2 was released.


    watto_cobra
  • Reply 86 of 118
    NY1822 said:
    these were somehow removed from my previous post...Huawei hacking?


    Is that wallpaper those fornicating flowers from The Wall?



    watto_cobra
  • Reply 87 of 118
    There may be some business use for this device but I believe we are a couple of years away from a consumer device. In my own opinion.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 88 of 118
    Soli said:

    With this announcement it is important to realize that not only is Trump walking back his allegations that Huawei is a security concern, but most of Europe is now challenging his claims.   In fact, Great Britian's head of intelligence just issued an ultimatum to Trump to "Put up (the evidence) or shut up".
    You're confusing the Trump executive administration with the US intelligence community; agencies which Trump does not like.

    Did you ever see the evidence that Putin and the Russians hacked the DNC email and meddled in our election? Nope. But you accept that they did.
    Good point.   Or, it would be if it were applicable.   It is not the U.S. intelligence community who made the allegations of spying against Huawei, it was Trump.   And, not only is the rest of the world starting to question those allegations, but Trump is starting to walk them back.
    You mention the rage carrot so often now on AI that I have to assume that you're paid every time you post his name. 🤦‍♂️
    You assume wrong.  You seem to do that quite a bit.
  • Reply 89 of 118
    tmay said:

    With this announcement it is important to realize that not only is Trump walking back his allegations that Huawei is a security concern, but most of Europe is now challenging his claims.   In fact, Great Britian's head of intelligence just issued an ultimatum to Trump to "Put up (the evidence) or shut up".
    You're confusing the Trump executive administration with the US intelligence community; agencies which Trump does not like.

    Did you ever see the evidence that Putin and the Russians hacked the DNC email and meddled in our election? Nope. But you accept that they did.
    Good point.   Or, it would be if it were applicable.   It is not the U.S. intelligence community who made the allegations of spying against Huawei, it was Trump.   And, not only is the rest of the world starting to question those allegations, but Trump is starting to walk them back.
    The U.S. Intelligence Community is for banning Huawei from U.S. infrastructure decidedly because Huawei is a private company that has Chinese Communist Party leadership and is at the beck and call of the Chinese Communist Party. Huawei is certainly part of the State economic Plan, so belies the "private" company that we would recognize in the West. I would add that China is an aggressive power in South Asia, is an adversary of Western Democracy in the Pacific, and it noted for its "soft" power bought and paid for in Western Democracies. With that, I actually expect a shooting war to break out within the next decade in the South China Sea between Western and Chinese Naval forces.

    Do you need links for the above? They are plentiful.

    If you are fine with the U.S. requiring purchase of Huawei Telecom gear because it is "fair", then I would tell you that China is anything but a fair player, and that has been born out in many industries.

    With all that, we voters in the U.S. have a number of options to remove a President, from Amendments for impaired mental capacity, Articles of Impeachment, or, via a democratic election of another President. Sadly, China Citizens are not in the same position. When you decide to choose between the U.S. and China, keep that in mind.

    Here's a couple of links;

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/global-opinions/the-west-ignored-crimes-against-humanity-in-the-1930s-its-happening-again-now/2019/02/15/d17d4998-3130-11e9-813a-0ab2f17e305b_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.47bc9ce73d7d

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/23/business/china-entrepreneurs-confidence.html

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/feb/21/chinese-port-bans-imports-of-australian-coal-sending-dollar-tumbling?CMP=share_btn_tw

    https://nationalinterest.org/feature/are-freedom-navigation-operations-east-asia-enough-45257

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2019-01-10/china-s-digital-silk-road-is-looking-more-like-an-iron-curtain
    Yeh, that's the line espoused by our esteemed president.  But, it is not backed by any facts other than alternative ones.
    Meanwhile not only is it being challenged by a number of European countries -- for example: the head of Britain's intelligence services just told him to either put up or shut up - but Trump is apparently starting to walk it back himself.

    Basically, the argument is built on the anti-China thing: "because its a Chinese company it therefor must be a spy of the Chinese government".   It's how Trump plays politics.  And this is a political fight rather than a technical or national intelligence one.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 90 of 118

    With this announcement it is important to realize that not only is Trump walking back his allegations that Huawei is a security concern, but most of Europe is now challenging his claims.   In fact, Great Britian's head of intelligence just issued an ultimatum to Trump to "Put up (the evidence) or shut up".
    You're confusing the Trump executive administration with the US intelligence community; agencies which Trump does not like.

    Did you ever see the evidence that Putin and the Russians hacked the DNC email and meddled in our election? Nope. But you accept that they did.
    Good point.   Or, it would be if it were applicable.   It is not the U.S. intelligence community who made the allegations of spying against Huawei, it was Trump.   And, not only is the rest of the world starting to question those allegations, but Trump is starting to walk them back.
    Incorrect. Six US intelligence agencies, which debriefed US senators. The same agencies Trump decries for their comments about him. There is no way Trump controls these six agencies and made them fake their conclusions. 

    “Don’t use Huawei phones, say heads of FBI, CIA, and NSA”

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/14/17011246/huawei-phones-safe-us-intelligence-chief-fears

    US Senators: “Huawei is effectively an arm of the Chinese government”

    https://www.cio.com.au/article/633134/huawei-effectively-an-arm-chinese-government-us-senator/

    ...so if you believed them when they said Russia helped Trump win, I want to know why you choose not to believe them now. Other than confirmation bias, of course. 
    Because it is based on the assumption that all Chinese companies are enemies of the U.S. rather than any set of facts.   And, 'a group of U.S. senators' can be found to say most anything -- especially if it's really, really stupid.
    edited February 26 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 91 of 118
    chasm said:
    1. The current administration is not the one that judged Huawei (and ZTE) to be too big a security risk for any of their agencies to buy either brand. That was the Pentagon, backed up by the NSA and the previous administration.

    2. It is not in dispute that Huawei is state-controlled.

    3. The CFO of Huawei is being held in Canada on charges of fraud, pretending that a bank called Skycom was not affiliated with Huawei when in fact it was the same company. The US charges that Huawei used this shell company to access the Iran market in dealings that contravene U.S. sanctions. The charges haven't been proven, but the extradition from Canada hasn't been withdrawn, and she's been denied bail.

    4. The Chinese government is still going ahead with trade talks with the present administration, which suggests that while they don't like the Huawei situation, she's not worth fighting very hard over.

    5. The Huawei rendering of their foldable phone looks a lot nicer than Samsung's physical unit, but as pointed out by others above the foolishness of put the screen on the outside and having a visible crease rules this out as anything but a proof-of-concept that nobody in their right mind is going to actually buy.
    #1 Is semi-true.  It has been suggested to proceed with caution with Huawei, but not based on any evidence of actual wrong-doing.
    #2-#4 Are disputed political claims based on political agendas.
    #5 The reviews I have seen of the Huawei phone said it was superior to the Samsung.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 92 of 118
    kevin kee said:
    tzeshan said:
    I think every Apple fans agree that if Apple make a foldable iPhone it will use a different design not just a copycat. And in a couple years Samsung and Huawei will change their foldable to look exactly like Apple's design. Case in point. Apple removed the 3.5 mm jack in iPhone 7. Apple was ridiculed by Google and the media. Now after two years Google Pixel 3, Samsung Galaxy S10s and Fold, Huawei Mate X all removed the 3.5 mm jack. The media ridiculed Apple in order to give the Android copycats time to implement so Apple will not grab bigger pie. 
    I don't see media ridicule Samsung nor Huawei to come out with this ridiculous foldable design though. They only do that to iPhone.
    Yeh, unfortunately Apple has fallen into the trap of being held to a higher standard.   I find that troublesome -- because while a blunder by Apple will be totally blown out of proportion the same will be quickly dismissed from any other manufacturer.  That's a disservice to both Apple and its customers.
  • Reply 93 of 118
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,844member

    With this announcement it is important to realize that not only is Trump walking back his allegations that Huawei is a security concern, but most of Europe is now challenging his claims.   In fact, Great Britian's head of intelligence just issued an ultimatum to Trump to "Put up (the evidence) or shut up".
    You're confusing the Trump executive administration with the US intelligence community; agencies which Trump does not like.

    Did you ever see the evidence that Putin and the Russians hacked the DNC email and meddled in our election? Nope. But you accept that they did.
    Good point.   Or, it would be if it were applicable.   It is not the U.S. intelligence community who made the allegations of spying against Huawei, it was Trump.   And, not only is the rest of the world starting to question those allegations, but Trump is starting to walk them back.
    Incorrect. Six US intelligence agencies, which debriefed US senators. The same agencies Trump decries for their comments about him. There is no way Trump controls these six agencies and made them fake their conclusions. 

    “Don’t use Huawei phones, say heads of FBI, CIA, and NSA”

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/14/17011246/huawei-phones-safe-us-intelligence-chief-fears

    US Senators: “Huawei is effectively an arm of the Chinese government”

    https://www.cio.com.au/article/633134/huawei-effectively-an-arm-chinese-government-us-senator/

    ...so if you believed them when they said Russia helped Trump win, I want to know why you choose not to believe them now. Other than confirmation bias, of course. 
    Because it is based on the assumption that all Chinese companies are enemies of the U.S. rather than any set of facts.   And, 'a group of U.S. senators' can be found to say most anything -- especially if it's really, really stupid.
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/02/adam-schiff-authoritarianism-threat-democracy/583609/

    "Our optimism was once again misplaced. The past decade has demonstrated that democratic change is not inevitable, but must be doggedly pursued by free societies. At present, democracies are backsliding the world over, with threats to the rule of law, freedom of the press, and independent civil society growing ever more severe. The unipolar moment of the 1990s has given way to an emboldened Russia headed by Vladimir Putin and an increasingly assertive China led by Xi Jinping, both bent on promoting their own brand of authoritarian rule through a combination of military might, cyber–informational warfare and theft, and the skillful use of economic leverage."

    So tell me again why the U.S. must allow Huawei Telecom into it's infrastructure, because I see substantial risk, as do our and other Intelligence services, and as a fact, we have Northern European Democracies that will be happy to provide us 5G buildout. Why should we reward so called "private and independent" companies in China who must in fact answer to the CCP.
    SoliStrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 94 of 118
    tmay said:

    With this announcement it is important to realize that not only is Trump walking back his allegations that Huawei is a security concern, but most of Europe is now challenging his claims.   In fact, Great Britian's head of intelligence just issued an ultimatum to Trump to "Put up (the evidence) or shut up".
    You're confusing the Trump executive administration with the US intelligence community; agencies which Trump does not like.

    Did you ever see the evidence that Putin and the Russians hacked the DNC email and meddled in our election? Nope. But you accept that they did.
    Good point.   Or, it would be if it were applicable.   It is not the U.S. intelligence community who made the allegations of spying against Huawei, it was Trump.   And, not only is the rest of the world starting to question those allegations, but Trump is starting to walk them back.
    Incorrect. Six US intelligence agencies, which debriefed US senators. The same agencies Trump decries for their comments about him. There is no way Trump controls these six agencies and made them fake their conclusions. 

    “Don’t use Huawei phones, say heads of FBI, CIA, and NSA”

    https://www.theverge.com/2018/2/14/17011246/huawei-phones-safe-us-intelligence-chief-fears

    US Senators: “Huawei is effectively an arm of the Chinese government”

    https://www.cio.com.au/article/633134/huawei-effectively-an-arm-chinese-government-us-senator/

    ...so if you believed them when they said Russia helped Trump win, I want to know why you choose not to believe them now. Other than confirmation bias, of course. 
    Because it is based on the assumption that all Chinese companies are enemies of the U.S. rather than any set of facts.   And, 'a group of U.S. senators' can be found to say most anything -- especially if it's really, really stupid.
    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/02/adam-schiff-authoritarianism-threat-democracy/583609/

    "Our optimism was once again misplaced. The past decade has demonstrated that democratic change is not inevitable, but must be doggedly pursued by free societies. At present, democracies are backsliding the world over, with threats to the rule of law, freedom of the press, and independent civil society growing ever more severe. The unipolar moment of the 1990s has given way to an emboldened Russia headed by Vladimir Putin and an increasingly assertive China led by Xi Jinping, both bent on promoting their own brand of authoritarian rule through a combination of military might, cyber–informational warfare and theft, and the skillful use of economic leverage."

    So tell me again why the U.S. must allow Huawei Telecom into it's infrastructure, because I see substantial risk, as do our and other Intelligence services, and as a fact, we have Northern European Democracies that will be happy to provide us 5G buildout. Why should we reward so called "private and independent" companies in China who must in fact answer to the CCP.
    Now THAT is a conversation worth having.
    Unfortunately, it has been drowned out by political rhetoric ("China is an authoritarian government") and chest thumping.

    But, it is a multi-part question:
    1)  Does China intend to attack the U.S.?  And, if so, how?  (And assumptions don't count.  Neither does competition from superior technology)
    2)  Is Huawei controlled by the Chinese government or is it an independent company?
    3)  Does, say, Europe have more to fear from a Chinese company being manipulated by its government anymore than it does any other company by it's government?
    4)  Should we fear governments more than we fear corporations?   (Facebook, Cambridge Analytica, Internet Research, etc...)

    The world is changing and it's complicated.   The good guy's don't always wear white hats and the bad guy's don't always wear black hats.  And sometimes it's the grey hats who are the real threats.

    And, it is those questions that both public and private sectors of Europe are asking right now.   In addition to Britain's head of security questioning the U.S.'s assertions we have the private sector as well.  (But all seem to agree on the need for increased vigilance.)

    "The United States needs to share any evidence it has about Huawei with European authorities so they can take a common view about whether to use the Chinese group’s technology in their networks, the head of Vodafone said on Monday."

    "The GSMA, which groups 300 operators worldwide, has pushed back against U.S. calls on its European allies to bar Huawei Technologies over concerns the firm is too close to the Chinese state and its equipment may be open to cyber spies.

    It has instead proposed a stronger Europe-wide testing regime to ensure that, as operators build next-generation 5G networks, smartphones and the billions of connected devices that will be hooked up to the ‘Internet of Things’ are protected from hackers."

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-telecoms-mobileworld/telecoms-industry-sees-need-to-tighten-network-security-regardless-of-huawei-idUSKCN1QF123


    Added After thought:  In addition to assessing immediate security risks, we also need to assess the long term damage done by excluding potentially cheaper but superior technologies (both current and future) from our nation.







    edited February 26 muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 95 of 118
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 4,066member
    I prefer not to go too far into politics given that this is a thread on a folding phone but one thing has become clear over the last two years.

    The US/Huawei situation has very little to do with security in a tangible sense. It is simply classic protectionism and the US president has basically acknowledged this in his recent tweets.

    Things are now coming full circle (or full circus, depending on viewpoint) and we are now seeing that evidence of the US claims simply doesn't exist. 

    It has been widely reported that several EU governments requested evidence but never received any. Huawei has also not been given any evidence.The US even countered that evidence wasn't necessary.

    So, after all the urging, hawking, warning and then outright threats, yesterday, the CEO of Huawei stood on stage in front of the world's top ICT executives (and watching governments) in Barcelona and literally called the US out. 

    "The US security accusation of our 5G has no evidence. Nothing"

    When he put up a slide on trustworthiness and then  mentioned Edward Snowden, the audience reacted in agreement. The sad irony was huge.

    Now, in a new twist, US politicians are proposing ripping out Huawei smart inverter boards from energy infrastructure in the US.

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/02/25/huawei_us_electric_grid/

    Of course, the proposal itself is somewhat telling as it defines Huawei as a 'world leader' in inverter boards. Protectionism once again parading under the banner of national security.

    So, if there really is something of concern that world governments should be aware of regarding Huawei, it really is about time to plunk it on the table because competition is going to take a hit, prices will go up and technological progress will be slowed down.

    One potential market for this phone is of course the US so it would be nice to see Huawei allowed to compete there without protectionist obstacles blocking the way.

    The people who know telecoms security better than governments are the manufacturers, industry bodies and the carriers. Not one of them has made the same claims as the US government on Huawei. 

    AT&T actually had a done deal (US distribution) with Huawei for last year and is a Huawei partner in Mexico.



    edited February 26 muthuk_vanalingamGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 96 of 118
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,844member
    avon b7 said:
    I prefer not to go too far into politics given that this is a thread on a folding phone but one thing has become clear over the last two years.

    The US/Huawei situation has very little to do with security in a tangible sense. It is simply classic protectionism and the US president has basically acknowledged this in his recent tweets.

    Things are now coming full circle (or full circus, depending on viewpoint) and we are now seeing that evidence of the US claims simply doesn't exist. 

    It has been widely reported that several EU governments requested evidence but never received any. Huawei has also not been given any evidence.The US even countered that evidence wasn't necessary.

    So, after all the urging, hawking, warning and then outright threats, yesterday, the CEO of Huawei stood on stage in front of the world's top ICT executives (and watching governments) in Barcelona and literally called the US out. 

    "The US security accusation of our 5G has no evidence. Nothing"

    When he put up a slide on trustworthiness and then  mentioned Edward Snowden, the audience reacted in agreement. The sad irony was huge.

    Now, in a new twist, US politicians are proposing ripping out Huawei smart inverter boards from energy infrastructure in the US.

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/02/25/huawei_us_electric_grid/

    Of course, the proposal itself is somewhat telling as it defines Huawei as a 'world leader' in inverter boards. Protectionism once again parading under the banner of national security.

    So, if there really is something of concern that world governments should be aware of regarding Huawei, it really is about time to plunk it on the table because competition is going to take a hit, prices will go up and technological progress will be slowed down.

    One potential market for this phone is of course the US so it would be nice to see Huawei allowed to compete there without protectionist obstacles blocking the way.

    The people who know telecoms security better than governments are the manufacturers, industry bodies and the carriers. Not one of them has made the same claims as the US government on Huawei. 

    AT&T actually had a done deal (US distribution) with Huawei for last year and is a Huawei partner in Mexico.



    http://credibletarget.net/notes/GaoHua

    "All this is a delicate balancing act. As a relatively smart authoritarian with a strong Party apparatus behind him, Xi may well not over-reach too much too soon. He’s shown an ability to tactically withdraw when resistance gets too heated. But the logic of his ambitions mean that he will eventually over-reach and eventually, the money will begin to run out. It is at this point, and it may be in five, ten years time, or further away, that Xi’s character - and what he really thinks of Mao - will matter. And here, its worth returning to John Garnaut, whose scariest point was that the logic of this system requires an enemy. That’s really now everyone who is “Western”, and who is trying “to prevent China’s rise”. With a closed economy, it was hard for Mao to blame foreigners for his disasters. Xi has more room to do just that."

    Hence the New Cold War; authoritarian China vs Western Democracies. Make a playdate for the end of the next decade for the Taiwan Straits and the South China Sea.

    https://twitter.com/AndrewSErickson
    edited February 26
  • Reply 97 of 118
    jdgaz said:
    One more device. Clearly a solution to an unknown problem.

    I can think a few problems:
    1. Huawei phones are too affordable
    2. Not enough tablets have weird lumps in the middle of the screen
    3. Gorilla Glass is too hard to scratch
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 98 of 118
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    I prefer not to go too far into politics given that this is a thread on a folding phone but one thing has become clear over the last two years.

    The US/Huawei situation has very little to do with security in a tangible sense. It is simply classic protectionism and the US president has basically acknowledged this in his recent tweets.

    Things are now coming full circle (or full circus, depending on viewpoint) and we are now seeing that evidence of the US claims simply doesn't exist. 

    It has been widely reported that several EU governments requested evidence but never received any. Huawei has also not been given any evidence.The US even countered that evidence wasn't necessary.

    So, after all the urging, hawking, warning and then outright threats, yesterday, the CEO of Huawei stood on stage in front of the world's top ICT executives (and watching governments) in Barcelona and literally called the US out. 

    "The US security accusation of our 5G has no evidence. Nothing"

    When he put up a slide on trustworthiness and then  mentioned Edward Snowden, the audience reacted in agreement. The sad irony was huge.

    Now, in a new twist, US politicians are proposing ripping out Huawei smart inverter boards from energy infrastructure in the US.

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/02/25/huawei_us_electric_grid/

    Of course, the proposal itself is somewhat telling as it defines Huawei as a 'world leader' in inverter boards. Protectionism once again parading under the banner of national security.

    So, if there really is something of concern that world governments should be aware of regarding Huawei, it really is about time to plunk it on the table because competition is going to take a hit, prices will go up and technological progress will be slowed down.

    One potential market for this phone is of course the US so it would be nice to see Huawei allowed to compete there without protectionist obstacles blocking the way.

    The people who know telecoms security better than governments are the manufacturers, industry bodies and the carriers. Not one of them has made the same claims as the US government on Huawei. 

    AT&T actually had a done deal (US distribution) with Huawei for last year and is a Huawei partner in Mexico.



    http://credibletarget.net/notes/GaoHua

    "All this is a delicate balancing act. As a relatively smart authoritarian with a strong Party apparatus behind him, Xi may well not over-reach too much too soon. He’s shown an ability to tactically withdraw when resistance gets too heated. But the logic of his ambitions mean that he will eventually over-reach and eventually, the money will begin to run out. It is at this point, and it may be in five, ten years time, or further away, that Xi’s character - and what he really thinks of Mao - will matter. And here, its worth returning to John Garnaut, whose scariest point was that the logic of this system requires an enemy. That’s really now everyone who is “Western”, and who is trying “to prevent China’s rise”. With a closed economy, it was hard for Mao to blame foreigners for his disasters. Xi has more room to do just that."

    Hence the New Cold War; authoritarian China vs Western Democracies. Make a playdate for the end of the next decade for the Taiwan Straits and the South China Sea.

    https://twitter.com/AndrewSErickson
    That assumes that Huawei is controlled or influenced by Xi.   There is no more basis for that than to assume Microsoft or Cisco is controlled by Trump.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 99 of 118
    tzeshan said:
    I think every Apple fans agree that if Apple make a foldable iPhone it will use a different design not just a copycat. And in a couple years Samsung and Huawei will change their foldable to look exactly like Apple's design. Case in point. Apple removed the 3.5 mm jack in iPhone 7. Apple was ridiculed by Google and the media. Now after two years Google Pixel 3, Samsung Galaxy S10s and Fold, Huawei Mate X all removed the 3.5 mm jack. The media ridiculed Apple in order to give the Android copycats time to implement so Apple will not grab bigger pie. 
    They also ridiculed Apple for blocking Adobe Flash on iOS. Adobe Flash.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 100 of 118
    tmaytmay Posts: 3,844member
    tmay said:
    avon b7 said:
    I prefer not to go too far into politics given that this is a thread on a folding phone but one thing has become clear over the last two years.

    The US/Huawei situation has very little to do with security in a tangible sense. It is simply classic protectionism and the US president has basically acknowledged this in his recent tweets.

    Things are now coming full circle (or full circus, depending on viewpoint) and we are now seeing that evidence of the US claims simply doesn't exist. 

    It has been widely reported that several EU governments requested evidence but never received any. Huawei has also not been given any evidence.The US even countered that evidence wasn't necessary.

    So, after all the urging, hawking, warning and then outright threats, yesterday, the CEO of Huawei stood on stage in front of the world's top ICT executives (and watching governments) in Barcelona and literally called the US out. 

    "The US security accusation of our 5G has no evidence. Nothing"

    When he put up a slide on trustworthiness and then  mentioned Edward Snowden, the audience reacted in agreement. The sad irony was huge.

    Now, in a new twist, US politicians are proposing ripping out Huawei smart inverter boards from energy infrastructure in the US.

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2019/02/25/huawei_us_electric_grid/

    Of course, the proposal itself is somewhat telling as it defines Huawei as a 'world leader' in inverter boards. Protectionism once again parading under the banner of national security.

    So, if there really is something of concern that world governments should be aware of regarding Huawei, it really is about time to plunk it on the table because competition is going to take a hit, prices will go up and technological progress will be slowed down.

    One potential market for this phone is of course the US so it would be nice to see Huawei allowed to compete there without protectionist obstacles blocking the way.

    The people who know telecoms security better than governments are the manufacturers, industry bodies and the carriers. Not one of them has made the same claims as the US government on Huawei. 

    AT&T actually had a done deal (US distribution) with Huawei for last year and is a Huawei partner in Mexico.



    http://credibletarget.net/notes/GaoHua

    "All this is a delicate balancing act. As a relatively smart authoritarian with a strong Party apparatus behind him, Xi may well not over-reach too much too soon. He’s shown an ability to tactically withdraw when resistance gets too heated. But the logic of his ambitions mean that he will eventually over-reach and eventually, the money will begin to run out. It is at this point, and it may be in five, ten years time, or further away, that Xi’s character - and what he really thinks of Mao - will matter. And here, its worth returning to John Garnaut, whose scariest point was that the logic of this system requires an enemy. That’s really now everyone who is “Western”, and who is trying “to prevent China’s rise”. With a closed economy, it was hard for Mao to blame foreigners for his disasters. Xi has more room to do just that."

    Hence the New Cold War; authoritarian China vs Western Democracies. Make a playdate for the end of the next decade for the Taiwan Straits and the South China Sea.

    https://twitter.com/AndrewSErickson
    That assumes that Huawei is controlled or influenced by Xi.   There is no more basis for that than to assume Microsoft or Cisco is controlled by Trump.
    Sure, the same assumptions are true, because the two systems of government are equivalent. /s
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
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