Apple's 'There's More to iPhone' campaign highlights environmental and data protection fea...

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  • Reply 21 of 24
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 4,189member
    tyler82 said:
    Whether a "bug" due to negligent software engineering or purposeful intent, the point is that the iPhone isn't the fully secure enclave that Apple is trying to advertise it as. 

    Being more secure than Android doesn't make it a secure device. I want Apple to do better because I value my privacy.
    Apple do do better!

    You don’t get this. A bug is not due to “purposeful intent” given that it is an unintended software defect! Any moderately complex piece of software will have bugs (just look at the release notes from you app developers when they update an app) and an operating system is incredibly complex. The difference is what happens when bugs are found. Apple addresses them ASAP, but, and this is crucial, is able to deliver the fix to millions of customers almost instantly. This is what happens when you make the device and it’s software and control the update process.

    The FaceTime issue was a bug. What Apple are pointing out with their series of adverts is that iOS is designed intentionally to be secure and to highly value privacy. That is a feature that Apple deliver to a higher degree than any other consumer device manufacturer.
    It's a double edged sword.

    If you sell a message (to your average consumer) as you say, of intentional design for security, when big bugs do pop up, people will logically ask what happened to security.

    In reply, to turn around and say in layman's terms 'shit happens', it doesn't really cut it - although that may be true.

    That's why this kind of marketing is a bit of a qaugmire.

    Especially when you run into dubious situations where 'designed for security' doesn't equal 'fully tested for security' 

    That's an even murkier subject.

    You can play safe and argue that your track record has been one of the best because you take security and privacy very seriously or you can outright say we design from the get go for privacy and security (implying that that is what you get out of the box), and then take the flak is something nasty slips under the radar.

    It's just a question of time before something truly nasty happens to one of the major players. Personally, I think this is not an 'if' situation but a 'when' situation.
  • Reply 22 of 24
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,096member
    gatorguy said:
    tjwolf said:
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    Use of the word "absolve" doesn't make sense in this context.  Besides - and I didn't think anybody needed to have this explained to them: all software has bugs.  What separates good software companies from bad ones is the speed with which they fix things and make those fixes available to their software customers.  In case of iOS/Apple versus Android/Google, it's not even close.  When Apple fixes a bug in iOS, everyone with a phone < 5 years old immediately has that fix available to them.  On the Android side, most devices aren't even supported for more than a couple years, much less get urgent updates right away.
    Another good reason to stick with the company who supplies the OS. In the case of Android that would be Google and its Pixels. 
    Even some of Google's Pixel flagships received a short lifespan of supported updates. It was just a couple years as I recall...very weak compared to iPhone supported versions.
    Which Pixel phones would that be? Mine is the original Pixel phone and still being supported with OS and security updates. It even gets backward support for many (most?) of the features from the very latest Pixel 3 models released just months ago, things like Night Sight for instance. I'm good with it. 
    avon b7
  • Reply 23 of 24
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 5,137member
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    This post is an example of Apple's dilemma:  Apple products are widely accepted as The Best.  But that is due to their software and ecosystem rather than their hardware (Except for the Apple Watch, their newest hardware is matched by their competitors as soon as it is released)..

    But, as soon as they promote their software and ecosystem they get a nut case spouting about some minor exception and trying to use that exception to prove a generalized case about Apple.
  • Reply 24 of 24
    crowleycrowley Posts: 6,017member
    gatorguy said:
    gatorguy said:
    tjwolf said:
    tyler82 said:
    Doesn’t the Group FaceTime bug absolve apple of their claims to be “secure?” 
    Use of the word "absolve" doesn't make sense in this context.  Besides - and I didn't think anybody needed to have this explained to them: all software has bugs.  What separates good software companies from bad ones is the speed with which they fix things and make those fixes available to their software customers.  In case of iOS/Apple versus Android/Google, it's not even close.  When Apple fixes a bug in iOS, everyone with a phone < 5 years old immediately has that fix available to them.  On the Android side, most devices aren't even supported for more than a couple years, much less get urgent updates right away.
    Another good reason to stick with the company who supplies the OS. In the case of Android that would be Google and its Pixels. 
    Even some of Google's Pixel flagships received a short lifespan of supported updates. It was just a couple years as I recall...very weak compared to iPhone supported versions.
    Which Pixel phones would that be? Mine is the original Pixel phone and still being supported with OS and security updates. It even gets backward support for many (most?) of the features from the very latest Pixel 3 models released just months ago, things like Night Sight for instance. I'm good with it. 
    https://support.google.com/nexus/answer/4457705

    2 years of guaranteed Android updates from first availability.  Maybe more after that, but not guaranteed.  
    3 years of guaranteed security updates from first availability.  Maybe more after that, but not guaranteed.


    I can't find any stated guarantee for iPhone updates, but since the 3GS there's never been less than 3 years of x.0 updates (and more of x.x updates)




    If Google haven't yet stopped updating the Pixel then I'd say they appear to be roughly on a par.
    avon b7
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