Tim Cook inaugurates Apple Carnegie Library with help from DC's mayor

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 2019
Apple drew special attention to the launch of its Carnegie Library store in D.C. on Saturday, bringing not just CEO Tim Cook but retail head Deirdre O'Brien, marketing chief Phil Schiller, and the city's mayor, Muriel Bowser.

Apple Carnegie Library opening with Tim Cook and Muriel Bowser


The event was publicized on Twitter by Cook and Bowser, the latter of whom shared a video of some of the first shoppers entering the store. The pair were joined by a media pool and some of the store's staff, who cheered and clapped to drum up excitement. Sizable crowds were in attendance.

Welcome to Apple Carnegie Library. #DCProud to open the store with @tim_cook and to greet residents who will now work and shop here. pic.twitter.com/kMzr4EL8i3

-- Muriel Bowser (@MurielBowser)


Further photos were published on Instagram by O'Brien.

View this post on Instagram

Today was a special day for Apple. We opened the doors for the first time at Apple Carnegie Library and it was an an absolute thrill to welcome customers to our new home in Washington D.C.

A post shared by Deirdre O'Brien (@deirdre.at.apple) on May 11, 2019 at 10:15am PDT

Development on Apple Carnegie Library began in 2016. Apple calls it its "most extensive historic restoration project to date," requiring lengthy work on facades and details. Running with the theme of the building -- and possibly trying to counter controversy over the relocation of the Library's book collection -- the store will be hosting a "StoryMakers Festival" series of events between May 18 and June 29, featuring 40 artists.

Apple retail VP Deirdre O'Brien posing with shoppers.
Apple retail VP Deirdre O'Brien posing with shoppers.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,452member
    Somebody always comes along to throw shade on things like this so I’ll do it this time. The cultural advocates are not too happy with Apple taking over what they consider a part of D.C. heritage and turning it into an Apple temple, even though they have failed numerous times over the years to get anything funded to restore the building. Many proposed projects but no action. Apple apparently spent $30 million on the restoration efforts and now those advocates are unhappy about it.

    https://www.citylab.com/design/2019/05/apple-store-washington-dc-carnegie-library-history-mt-vernon/589135/

    "By leasing the Carnegie Library building to Apple, the city has turned over a prominent cultural asset to an exclusive use: a tech enclave whose products are out of reach for many residents.”



    edited May 2019
  • Reply 2 of 13
    apple ][apple ][ Posts: 9,233member
    lkrupp said:

    "By leasing the Carnegie Library building to Apple, the city has turned over a prominent cultural asset to an exclusive use: a tech enclave whose products are out of reach for many residents.”
    Maybe they can turn a local landfill into an Android store or something, and this way everybody will be well served. 


    LordeHawklkruppLoneStar88mwhitesteven n.cornchipchasmSpamSandwichAppleExposedfrantisek
  • Reply 3 of 13
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,584member
    I can understand both sides.   In an ideal world, that library building would have been converted into a great public space.   But the city blew that over many decades and it seems pretty obvious that they weren't going to put in $30 million to renovate it (and if they had, being a Government deal, it would have cost $300 million and taken ten years).   On the other hand, Apple did indeed restore the building and even if one doesn't have the income to afford Apple products, one can walk into the building and use the computers.  I also assume that Apple doesn't occupy the entire building so the building is still being put to other uses.   

    And if the City had come up with the money to restore the building, what kind of public use could the building of had?  Does D.C. really need any more museums?   Even if it had become a museum, most museums are quite expensive today, so I'm not sure how many of the city's residents would have made use (and even if they had, how often do people visit the same museum - once a year, maybe?)   I'm a big fan of public libraries, but the library had moved out years ago.   It probably doesn't have the appropriate configuration to have become a school.   

    On a side note, while Apple products are expensive, when I'm on the NYC subways, I see lots of people who get on or off the trains in working class and low-income neighborhoods carrying iPhones.   I would assume they buy them on the monthly payment plan and they find a way to do it.   With the new NYC minimum wage of $15 an hour, three hours a month can just about pay for a phone.  Or maybe they're buying used or refurbished phones.   

    And yes, it would be nice if today's industrialists got together and left a legacy like Andrew Carnegie did.   But we have to deal with today's realities and at least in the case of Bill Gates' charities, the kind of work he's doing to end diseases might be far more valuable and important than restoring an old building.  
    mwhitefotoformatlarryjwminicoffee
  • Reply 4 of 13
    LordeHawkLordeHawk Posts: 168member
    lkrupp said:
    Somebody always comes along to throw shade on things like this so I’ll do it this time. The cultural advocates are not too happy with Apple taking over what they consider a part of D.C. heritage and turning it into an Apple temple, even though they have failed numerous times over the years to get anything funded to restore the building. Many proposed projects but no action. Apple apparently spent $30 million on the restoration efforts and now those advocates are unhappy about it.

    https://www.citylab.com/design/2019/05/apple-store-washington-dc-carnegie-library-history-mt-vernon/589135/

    "By leasing the Carnegie Library building to Apple, the city has turned over a prominent cultural asset to an exclusive use: a tech enclave whose products are out of reach for many residents.”



    Not good enough, somehow you made it positive!
    The negative is only the haters, this almost reads like modern journalism...
     
    cornchip
  • Reply 5 of 13
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,172member
    lkrupp said:
    Somebody always comes along to throw shade on things like this so I’ll do it this time. The cultural advocates are not too happy with Apple taking over what they consider a part of D.C. heritage and turning it into an Apple temple, even though they have failed numerous times over the years to get anything funded to restore the building. Many proposed projects but no action. Apple apparently spent $30 million on the restoration efforts and now those advocates are unhappy about it.

    https://www.citylab.com/design/2019/05/apple-store-washington-dc-carnegie-library-history-mt-vernon/589135/

    "By leasing the Carnegie Library building to Apple, the city has turned over a prominent cultural asset to an exclusive use: a tech enclave whose products are out of reach for many residents.”



    So basically those people just want it to sit there and rot to the point where its not worth restoring and then they'll be upset anyways. At least the building is live and its not like Apple totally gutted the place and significantly changed it. I think Apple recognizes the history of such a building.
    cornchip
  • Reply 6 of 13
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,856member
    apple ][ said:
    lkrupp said:

    "By leasing the Carnegie Library building to Apple, the city has turned over a prominent cultural asset to an exclusive use: a tech enclave whose products are out of reach for many residents.”
    Maybe they can turn a local landfill into an Android store or something, and this way everybody will be well served. 


    🤣👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻
  • Reply 7 of 13
    chasmchasm Posts: 2,391member
    The Carnegie Libraries are a good example (now sadly all but gone) of rich Americans giving back to the community by strengthening the infrastructure of America, the way FDR did as an example. While I would have preferred one of the surviving Carnegie Libraries be used as a museum for the man and some of his gifts and foibles, it is far far better for it to be an Apple store -- another bastion of knowledge and enlightenment -- than left to rot as it had been doing. Thanks, Tim.
    Solileavingthebigg
  • Reply 8 of 13
    rotateleftbyterotateleftbyte Posts: 1,527member
    chasm said:
    The Carnegie Libraries are a good example (now sadly all but gone) of rich Americans giving back to the community by strengthening the infrastructure of America, the way FDR did as an example. While I would have preferred one of the surviving Carnegie Libraries be used as a museum for the man and some of his gifts and foibles, it is far far better for it to be an Apple store -- another bastion of knowledge and enlightenment -- than left to rot as it had been doing. Thanks, Tim.
    Andrew Carnegie was a Scot born and bred. He was born in Dunfermerline. There is even a Museum there about him. (sic)
    He came to the US and made a lot of money (like an awful lot of people) but his philanthropy spanned much of the world. If you want evidence of his libraries then come to the UK. There are plenty of them still in use as a Library. There is even a wikipedia page that gives you all their locations.

    Anyway, back on topic.
    Now that Apple is in residence there will be a good amount of money flowing to the City from Apple that was not there before. Empty buildings generally don't pay taxes. The City could use that income to fund projects for the many low income families that live and work in the city. Complain to the City not Apple about that. Personally, I think it is good that an historic building is put back into use rather than left to rot, decay and eventually fall down. There are thousands of historically significant buildings around the world that have been put back into use but for other things. As long as the restoration is done right then the building can be used and loved for generations to come.
    badmonk
  • Reply 9 of 13
    LatkoLatko Posts: 398member
    Apple shows off its moral & financial superiority over governments as it determines what it spends it’s surplus capital on - instead of pouring it’s money in a more general pool of taxes to let govmnt. decide how to spend it. In this particular case, hardly anybody could oppose that. But stepping back a little, one realises this role change is alarming.
    edited May 2019
  • Reply 10 of 13
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    chasm said:
    The Carnegie Libraries are a good example (now sadly all but gone) of rich Americans giving back to the community by strengthening the infrastructure of America, the way FDR did as an example. While I would have preferred one of the surviving Carnegie Libraries be used as a museum for the man and some of his gifts and foibles, it is far far better for it to be an Apple store -- another bastion of knowledge and enlightenment -- than left to rot as it had been doing. Thanks, Tim.
    More public spaces should be privatized because government is a poor substitute for responsible people.
  • Reply 11 of 13
    williamhwilliamh Posts: 802member
    zoetmb said:
    I can understand both sides.   In an ideal world, that library building would have been converted into a great public space.   But the city blew that over many decades and it seems pretty obvious that they weren't going to put in $30 million to renovate it (and if they had, being a Government deal, it would have cost $300 million and taken ten years).   On the other hand, Apple did indeed restore the building and even if one doesn't have the income to afford Apple products, one can walk into the building and use the computers.  I also assume that Apple doesn't occupy the entire building so the building is still being put to other uses.   

    It's not that big a building, I expect they occupy the whole thing. 

    And if the City had come up with the money to restore the building, what kind of public use could the building of had?  Does D.C. really need any more museums?   Even if it had become a museum, most museums are quite expensive today, so I'm not sure how many of the city's residents would have made use (and even if they had, how often do people visit the same museum - once a year, maybe?)  
    While there are private museums that cost money, such as the Spy Museum, the city is also packed with the Smithsonian museums that are excellent and free. Your point stands, don't know if more are needed. In any event, that building wasn't going to turn into a compelling museum and its not in a good location for one.
    I'm a big fan of public libraries, but the library had moved out years ago.   It probably doesn't have the appropriate configuration to have become a school.   

    On a side note, while Apple products are expensive, when I'm on the NYC subways, I see lots of people who get on or off the trains in working class and low-income neighborhoods carrying iPhones.   I would assume they buy them on the monthly payment plan and they find a way to do it.   With the new NYC minimum wage of $15 an hour, three hours a month can just about pay for a phone.  Or maybe they're buying used or refurbished phones.   

    And yes, it would be nice if today's industrialists got together and left a legacy like Andrew Carnegie did.   But we have to deal with today's realities and at least in the case of Bill Gates' charities, the kind of work he's doing to end diseases might be far more valuable and important than restoring an old building.  
    I've been in the neighborhood many, many times and the building never served any apparent purpose.  People against Apple using the building should face that fact.  The city was never going to renovate it.
    randominternetpersonAppleExposed
  • Reply 12 of 13
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    zoetmb said:
    I can understand both sides.   In an ideal world, that library building would have been converted into a great public space.  

    That's exactly what Apple did.
  • Reply 13 of 13
    It's interesting to reflect that the new Apple Store will almost certainly host more people than any museum that might have occupied the space. So if you're thinking of this as a public space, it might well be the highest and best use of the property.
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