OWC updates USB-C Travel Dock with 100W power delivery

Posted:
in General Discussion
OWC has launched a new version of the USB-C Travel Dock, a compact accessory for the iPad Pro, Mac, and MacBooks that provides five essential ports to expand the host device's connectivity options, one that is also capable of being used to recharge a 15-inch MacBook Pro through the same connection.




Based on the original model with the same name from 2017, the new version offers an almost identical roster of five ports to consumers, including two USB 3.1 Type-A ports on opposite sides, and an extra USB 3.1 Type-C connection. While the original's USB Type-C port was capable of up to 60 Watts of power delivery, the new version has been increased to provide up to 100 Watts, allowing it to charge all of the MacBook Pro lineup.

The SD card slot supports SD, SDHC, and SDXC cards, along with UHS-II versions, with transfer speeds of up to 312MB per second possible with the right memory card. The HDMI 2.0 port is able to deliver 24-bit color, and can handle a resolution of up to 4096 by 2160 at 30Hz.

The physical design of the unit is also quite similar to the original, resembling a square space grey puck with an attached cable, though this time it is slightly taller, with a black section raising the metal surround off a table's surface. It also has a slightly smaller footprint, measuring 3.1 inches square, but with a taller height of 0.9 inches and a heavier weight of 120 grams (4.23 ounces).

Aside from power delivery, the other major change in the latest iteration is the addition of cable storage, hidden in the base. A small groove underneath can hold the attached cable, which can be diverted out a gap in the side when it is required.

OWC also provides Dock Ejector, free software for macOS that goes through the process of undocking all connected devices on behalf of the user, before the user physically disconnects the unit from the Mac.

The 2019 version of the OWC USB-C Travel Dock is available now from OWC directly, priced at $54.99.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 11
    Why no Ethernet port? Seems like an obvious port to include.
    wozwozwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 11
    wozwozwozwoz Posts: 237member
    Needs ethernet port!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 11
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 4,683member
    It's inexcusable that they don't include an ethernet port.  It's almost always a choice between an SD-card slot or ethernet, but not both.  That would have really completed it.  Heck, I myself would consider buying it.


    repressthisstevenozwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 11
    4096 by 2160 at 30Hz. 

    You mean 60Hz? [email protected]@8bpc is only 12.7Gbps, and HDMI 2.0 is able to handle 18Gbps. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 11
    wozwoz said:
    Needs ethernet port!
    They have hubs with Gigabit Ethernet connectivity. This seems to be a portable travel hub. OWC displayed and demonstrated this hub at the recent MacStock 2019 conference using the 2018 iPad Pro 12.9” and the beta of iOS13. It is a basic model but seems to get the job done at an entry level price. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 11
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,783administrator
    eggimage said:
    4096 by 2160 at 30Hz. 

    You mean 60Hz? [email protected]@8bpc is only 12.7Gbps, and HDMI 2.0 is able to handle 18Gbps. 
    We do not. This (and most others using USB 3.2 type C vice Thunderbolt 3) is 30Hz.
    edited August 13 watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 11
    neilmneilm Posts: 634member
    While the original's USB Type-C port was capable of up to 60 Watts of power delivery, the new version has been increased to provide up to 100 Watts, allowing it to charge all of the MacBook Pro lineup.
    You should have made clear that this dock does not itself provide charging power — it only provides pass-through power from a suitable USB-C external power supply. (OWC's web site is unambiguous on this.)
    edited August 14 stevenozwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 11
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,783administrator
    neilm said:
    While the original's USB Type-C port was capable of up to 60 Watts of power delivery, the new version has been increased to provide up to 100 Watts, allowing it to charge all of the MacBook Pro lineup.
    You should have made clear that this dock does not itself provide charging power — it only provides pass-through power from a suitable USB-C external power supply. (OWC's web site is unambiguous on this.)
    I'm not sure what you're asking about.

    At no point do we say that there's a battery in the unit. USB-C pass-through or AC-DC wall wart, they all have to get power somehow to provide charging power.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 11
    neilmneilm Posts: 634member
    neilm said:
    While the original's USB Type-C port was capable of up to 60 Watts of power delivery, the new version has been increased to provide up to 100 Watts, allowing it to charge all of the MacBook Pro lineup.
    You should have made clear that this dock does not itself provide charging power — it only provides pass-through power from a suitable USB-C external power supply. (OWC's web site is unambiguous on this.)
    I'm not sure what you're asking about.

    At no point do we say that there's a battery in the unit. USB-C pass-through or AC-DC wall wart, they all have to get power somehow to provide charging power.
    I'm not asking anything. As should be abundantly clear from my post, I'm pointing out an important omission in the article, which does not state where the power is to come from. It wouldn't be hard for a reader to think either that this dock has an external or internal power supply. It doesn't.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 11
    crowleycrowley Posts: 5,995member
    neilm said:
    neilm said:
    While the original's USB Type-C port was capable of up to 60 Watts of power delivery, the new version has been increased to provide up to 100 Watts, allowing it to charge all of the MacBook Pro lineup.
    You should have made clear that this dock does not itself provide charging power — it only provides pass-through power from a suitable USB-C external power supply. (OWC's web site is unambiguous on this.)
    I'm not sure what you're asking about.

    At no point do we say that there's a battery in the unit. USB-C pass-through or AC-DC wall wart, they all have to get power somehow to provide charging power.
    I'm not asking anything. As should be abundantly clear from my post, I'm pointing out an important omission in the article, which does not state where the power is to come from. It wouldn't be hard for a reader to think either that this dock has an external or internal power supply. It doesn't.
    It's not that important.  As you yourself pointed out, the linked OWC page unambiguously says right at the top that it's pass-through power.  I doubt many people would think a dock had a built-in battery.
    edited August 14 watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 11
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,783administrator
    neilm said:
    neilm said:
    While the original's USB Type-C port was capable of up to 60 Watts of power delivery, the new version has been increased to provide up to 100 Watts, allowing it to charge all of the MacBook Pro lineup.
    You should have made clear that this dock does not itself provide charging power — it only provides pass-through power from a suitable USB-C external power supply. (OWC's web site is unambiguous on this.)
    I'm not sure what you're asking about.

    At no point do we say that there's a battery in the unit. USB-C pass-through or AC-DC wall wart, they all have to get power somehow to provide charging power.
    I'm not asking anything. As should be abundantly clear from my post, I'm pointing out an important omission in the article, which does not state where the power is to come from. It wouldn't be hard for a reader to think either that this dock has an external or internal power supply. It doesn't.
    I do not believe we have covered a USB-C or Thunderbolt 3 dock with an internal power supply, and we have covered many of them.
    watto_cobra
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