Apple again reported to be planning in-display Touch ID for 2020 iPhones

Posted:
in General Discussion edited August 2020
Sources reportedly familiar with Apple's supply chain say that a new Touch ID fingerprint system is already being tested for next year's iPhone.

New iPhones in 2020 or 2021 may feature the return of Touch ID
New iPhones in 2020 or 2021 may feature the return of Touch ID


A new report claims that Apple is currently testing an iPhone model with a new version of Touch ID that uses sensors underneath the display. Rather than the previously separate home button, or the notch needed for Face ID to work, users would be able to touch their iPhone screen to have it register their fingerprint.

According to a report on Thursday from Bloomberg, unnamed sources say this technology is intended for the 2020 iPhones. However, the sources caution that it may slip back to the 2021 releases instead.

Apple has been said to be working on in-display Touch ID for some time, with certain patents regarding the technology being revealed in February. Still another patent was uncovered in April.

Analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has also claimed that this version of Touch ID will be coming to the iPhone. In August was saying he expected it to be in either the 2020 or 2021 models.

The new report in Bloomberg says that Apple's suppliers have yet to manage mass-producing the technology. Smartphones from rivals including Samsung currently offer an equivalent.

In Apple's case, the Touch ID system would likely in tandem with the newer Face ID, rather than replace it. As well as authentication, Face ID is also the basis for certain augmented reality and camera photography features.

The report also repeats recent speculation about Apple making a lower-cost iPhone next year. Separately, one claimed method of cutting costs could be reverting to a Touch ID-only device.

It isn't clear if Thursday's report is based on new sources of information, or is repeating old information.

Apple's 2019 iPhones are to be unveiled at an event on September 10.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 23
    Hmmm....piece a few 'rumours' together and it should arrive at: low end model iPhone SE will finally discard the Touch ID home button and align to full-size screen like its higher end siblings (iPhone XR, Xs and Xs Max in 2018, perhaps named as iPhone 11, 11 Pro and 11 Pro Max in 2019) by 2020 (in an optimistic perspective).
  • Reply 2 of 23
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 2,439member
    More biometrics == better, both for usability and security. 

    For a super secure mode, they could require finger print, faceid, and perhaps even voice recognition. 

    for a more flexible mode, require any one of those three. 
    Soligilly33netrox
  • Reply 3 of 23
    SoliSoli Posts: 10,030member
    blastdoor said:
    More biometrics == better, both for usability and security. 

    For a super secure mode, they could require finger print, faceid, and perhaps even voice recognition. 

    for a more flexible mode, require any one of those three. 
    I agree. Give me the option to have Touch ID for security with ease if I happen to have a twin or a teenage child that could trick Face ID. Give me the option to have Face ID if my fingerprint ridges don't trigger Touch ID effectively because of my age, medications, job, etc. If I'm within the typical range where both work well, give me the option to use both to allow for additional security for more secure items that I deem need more security. Although I don't see that last one happening with Apple.

    PS: I'd also like my poison-finger option added so that a specific finger can lockdown the device and disable biometrics, but I don't see that happening when Apple still displays message info on a lock screen that has not been authenticated with a passcode after a restart.
    muthuk_vanalingamgilly33SpamSandwich
  • Reply 4 of 23
    I have TouchiD for my iPhone 7 and faceID for my iPad, I prefer TouchID, in my experience, it works just as fast and is more reliable. I can see faceID being useful if my hands are wet though or have gloves on.
    netrox
  • Reply 5 of 23
    Soli said:
    blastdoor said:
    More biometrics == better, both for usability and security. 

    For a super secure mode, they could require finger print, faceid, and perhaps even voice recognition. 

    for a more flexible mode, require any one of those three. 
    I agree. Give me the option to have Touch ID for security with ease if I happen to have a twin or a teenage child that could trick Face ID. Give me the option to have Face ID if my fingerprint ridges don't trigger Touch ID effectively because of my age, medications, job, etc. If I'm within the typical range where both work well, give me the option to use both to allow for additional security for more secure items that I deem need more security. Although I don't see that last one happening with Apple.

    PS: I'd also like my poison-finger option added so that a specific finger can lockdown the device and disable biometrics, but I don't see that happening when Apple still displays message info on a lock screen that has not been authenticated with a passcode after a restart.
    Better for anyone wanting to easily unlock you phone with minimal / no force required. Also ditto to privacy...

    I do like the concept of the poison finger, tricky part would be avoiding it accidentally firing it off. Although I do get that finger id is the norm and anyone under 40 does not give a shit about privacy.
    razorpit
  • Reply 6 of 23
    Better security is always welcome. Hopefully they'll delete or reduce the notch significantly. I will probably be upgrading my X next year!
    Carnage
  • Reply 7 of 23
    The article and the commenters should be asking the question of whether the user can choose to disable the Face ID and use only the Touch ID. To me that would be "more" security because I consider the false positives of the Face ID to be an unacceptable risk.
  • Reply 8 of 23
    I simply make sense to have it in cheaper iPhone. Hopping for that long. Small notch and bezel less screen.

    And for more expensive models as second factor authentication.

    edited September 2019
  • Reply 9 of 23
    jbdragonjbdragon Posts: 2,246member
    seankill said:
    I have TouchiD for my iPhone 7 and faceID for my iPad, I prefer TouchID, in my experience, it works just as fast and is more reliable. I can see faceID being useful if my hands are wet though or have gloves on.
    I have FaceID onmy iPhone XS, and TouchID on my iPad Pro. I prefer FaceID so much more. That is mainly from using LastPass. Going to a site and having to enter my info, Lastpass pops up, see's me quickly goes away as my info is filled in, Login name and password, quickly and away I go. It's just done so quickly before I would have a chance to use TouchID if I had it on my phone. It's kind of a Hassle on my iPad as I have to keep reaching down to TouchID for LastPass. So it's being used all the time. If it was just logging into the phone and that's about it, OK, no big deal. But I h ave a lot of apps that Log me into them by FaceID or TouchID, and FaceID is just better. I'm just logged in quickly without having to touch TouchID as FaceID was used.

    But I get it, having both options and using what you like best. Sometimes one works better than the other in different situations.
    razorpitdedgecko
  • Reply 10 of 23
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,175member
    jbdragon said:
    seankill said:
    I have TouchiD for my iPhone 7 and faceID for my iPad, I prefer TouchID, in my experience, it works just as fast and is more reliable. I can see faceID being useful if my hands are wet though or have gloves on.
    I have FaceID onmy iPhone XS, and TouchID on my iPad Pro. I prefer FaceID so much more. That is mainly from using LastPass. Going to a site and having to enter my info, Lastpass pops up, see's me quickly goes away as my info is filled in, Login name and password, quickly and away I go. It's just done so quickly before I would have a chance to use TouchID if I had it on my phone. It's kind of a Hassle on my iPad as I have to keep reaching down to TouchID for LastPass. So it's being used all the time. If it was just logging into the phone and that's about it, OK, no big deal. But I h ave a lot of apps that Log me into them by FaceID or TouchID, and FaceID is just better. I'm just logged in quickly without having to touch TouchID as FaceID was used.

    But I get it, having both options and using what you like best. Sometimes one works better than the other in different situations.
    Both the IR emitter and dot projector would make it problematic for FaceID in a full screen slab display. Eliminating bezels is often referenced as a primary advantage of under-screen fingerprint recognition. To have both Face and touch the notch might need to remain too. 
    edited September 2019
  • Reply 11 of 23
    omasouomasou Posts: 215member
    IMO it's a new 3D Touch sensor not Touch ID.
  • Reply 12 of 23
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 1,216member
    The article and the commenters should be asking the question of whether the user can choose to disable the Face ID and use only the Touch ID. To me that would be "more" security because I consider the false positives of the Face ID to be an unacceptable risk.
    Is Face Id being fooled that regularly that it is considered less secure than Touch Id?  Or am I misunderstanding the false positives you mention?
  • Reply 13 of 23
    zoetmbzoetmb Posts: 2,586member
    I'm still using an iPhone 6 largely because I greatly prefer Touch ID to Face ID.  I'm not so concerned about security because even if I lose my phone, it's unlikely the thief or person who finds it will know what I look like in order to try and bypass Face ID, but when I'm in the car, I can use Touch ID without looking at the phone.   I can't do that with Face ID.   Also, when (in the future), using the phone, for example, to get on the subway, I don't want to have to look at the phone before tapping.  I can take the phone out of my pocket with my finger on the Touch ID button.   

    But...I don't know if I can holdout up to another two years to buy a new phone.  
  • Reply 14 of 23
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    blastdoor said:
    More biometrics == better, both for usability and security. 

    For a super secure mode, they could require finger print, faceid, and perhaps even voice recognition. 

    for a more flexible mode, require any one of those three. 
    Thinking out loud (not saying this is you) but how many people would like this added security to keep their FaceBook/Twitter/Whatever account 'more' secure?
  • Reply 15 of 23
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member

    zoetmb said:
    I'm still using an iPhone 6 largely because I greatly prefer Touch ID to Face ID.  I'm not so concerned about security because even if I lose my phone, it's unlikely the thief or person who finds it will know what I look like in order to try and bypass Face ID, but when I'm in the car, I can use Touch ID without looking at the phone.   I can't do that with Face ID.   Also, when (in the future), using the phone, for example, to get on the subway, I don't want to have to look at the phone before tapping.  I can take the phone out of my pocket with my finger on the Touch ID button.   

    But...I don't know if I can holdout up to another two years to buy a new phone.  
    How do you use your phone without looking at it?
    StrangeDaysdedgecko
  • Reply 16 of 23
    jcs2305jcs2305 Posts: 1,216member
    zoetmb said:
    I'm still using an iPhone 6 largely because I greatly prefer Touch ID to Face ID.  I'm not so concerned about security because even if I lose my phone, it's unlikely the thief or person who finds it will know what I look like in order to try and bypass Face ID, but when I'm in the car, I can use Touch ID without looking at the phone.   I can't do that with Face ID.   Also, when (in the future), using the phone, for example, to get on the subway, I don't want to have to look at the phone before tapping.  I can take the phone out of my pocket with my finger on the Touch ID button.   

    But...I don't know if I can holdout up to another two years to buy a new phone.  
    What does it matter what you look like to bypass Face Id?  You can't use a photo to bypass it.. Also how do you use your phone without looking at it?

    Honestly opening the phone with Face ID on my Xs Max is one motion, raise to wake makes this nice and smooth.  Your post makes me think you haven't used or quite get how Face id actually works?

    StrangeDaysdedgecko
  • Reply 17 of 23
    radarthekatradarthekat Posts: 3,395moderator
    "Smartphones from rivals including Samsung currently offer an equivalent."

    I wouldn't be confident its 'equivalent' when it comes to security.
  • Reply 18 of 23
    Once the entire industry has moved to behind-screen front cameras and deliver a true edge-to-edge screen, I really can't see Apple hanging onto the notch just for gimmicky features like animoji and highly detailed Snapchat filters. Apple has recent patents on both behind-screen camera technology and in-screen fingerprint reading. Unless they can somehow pull off behind-screen Face ID, I have to think it's eventually going to be discontinued. 
  • Reply 19 of 23
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,904member
    "Smartphones from rivals including Samsung currently offer an equivalent."

    I wouldn't be confident its 'equivalent' when it comes to security.
    If banks accept it, I think that's all the confidence you need.

    If you have truly sensitive information on your phone you put it in the phone's 'safe' anyway, adding another layer of security.
    Carnage
  • Reply 20 of 23
    netroxnetrox Posts: 1,054member
    I prefer TouchID in some sitautions and FaceID in other situations. It all depends but I think the combo will offer an optimal experience since you can touch anywhere on the screen and it will automatically register your tips and can also look at your FaceID to see if they "match" thus making it more secure. And there are times FaceID don't work because you're too close to phone or TouchID not working because you're wearing gloves.
    applesnoranges
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