Kuo: Apple to debut Tile-like tracker next week, new iPhone design in 2020

Posted:
in iPhone edited September 6
Ming-Chi Kuo also believes that an Apple tracking device is imminent, and will use Ultra Wide Band technology not just in the 2019 iPhone, but in the discrete devices as well.

New iPhones are expected to replace the iPhone XR, as seen here
New iPhones are expected on Tuesday that will replace the iPhone XR, as seen here


In a research note seen by AppleInsider Kuo believes that all three 2019 iPhone models will be equipped with Ultra Wide Band (UWB). The technology is said to integrate inside existing iPhone applications, with Kuo naming Apple Maps getting an assist in regards to indoor navigation.

Kuo pulls up short, before talking about Tile-like tracking devices and doesn't mention consumer use of the technology in that regard at all. The analyst predicts that Apple will cooperate with companies to enhance indoor navigation using UWB and the iBeacon technology, which could boost adoption of the iPhone.

JCET is predicted to be the major beneficiary of UWB inclusion. Kuo believes that UWB could be integrated with Bluetooth low energy (BLE), so it isn't presently clear if the predicted tracking devices will extend to earlier models, or be limited to just the 2019 iPhone lineup.

Looking forward to 2020, Kuo still predicts 5G in that year's iPhone. He is also expecting further camera improvements and the possibility of a new external design.

Apple's 2019 event is on Tuesday, September 10. The most recent rumors, with reasonably solid sources in the supply chain, say that they will be called the "iPhone 11" range. The equivalent of the current base model, the iPhone XR, is expected to be called the "iPhone 11." The updated iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max are expected to be called the "iPhone 11 Pro" and "iPhone 11 Pro Max."

The base model, the replacement for the iPhone XR, is thought to have two camera lenses, but the others will have a triple-lens system which includes a wide-angle lens.

A report also claims that software within iOS will be able to automatically combine photos from the different lenses and apply corrections or improvements to low-light images. The same report expects "significant" improvements to video recording, including the ability to add effects in-camera instead of after filming.

When it comes to power, the new models are expected to retain the Lightning port. Some reports have claimed that Apple may include a USB-C power brick in the iPhone box, versus the 5W USB-A model it has used for years.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 13
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,105member
    Yup new iBeacon for retailers too for matching up with the UWB tech in the upcoming iPhones. 

    But what happened to the "old" iBeacon that was initially so well received? Abandoned for the most part today, too many operational problems and potential consumer-side privacy issues. Among them:
    • Few customers have heard of beacons, so most haven’t installed retailer apps
    • Bluetooth has limited range and signals are easily blocked by people and store furniture
    • Customers tend to discontinue app use if they feel they’re being spammed
    • Growing concern about privacy, with apps failing to be upfront about the data they collect.
    Presumably the "new" version will avoid some of those issues, particularly the 2nd one but maybe not much else? Probably gotta wait at least a couple a weeks to find out what the changes are.
    edited September 6 cgWerks
  • Reply 2 of 13
    But it won’t take long for spammers and hackers to exploit any kind of signal-seeking behavior. iOS devices being unable to exclude random WiFi sources is just the tip of the iceberg with the problems for users and devices.
    cgWerks
  • Reply 3 of 13
    gatorguy said:
    • Few customers have heard of beacons, so most haven’t installed retailer apps
    Many customers have heard of iBeacons, but don't want to be tracked by them.
  • Reply 4 of 13
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,010member
    bonobob said:
    gatorguy said:
    • Few customers have heard of beacons, so most haven’t installed retailer apps
    Many customers have heard of iBeacons, but don't want to be tracked by them.

    Tracked by them? How exactly can an iBeacons track you?
    edited September 6
  • Reply 5 of 13
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,105member
    mjtomlin said:
    bonobob said:
    gatorguy said:
    • Few customers have heard of beacons, so most haven’t installed retailer apps
    Many customers have heard of iBeacons, but don't want to be tracked by them.

    Tracked by them? How exactly can an iBeacons track you?
    https://multichannelmerchant.com/marketing/data-can-beacon-actually-collect/

    "...the benefits of beacons are two-fold: increase conversion and purchases with right-time marketing, and collect first-party customer data....
    (but) a beacon is only activated when an in-store customer who has Bluetooth enabled and has downloaded the store app – and agreed to the terms and conditions – is in proximity. Without the app or Bluetooth turned on, beacon technology does not work.

    Thankfully, and likely in anticipation of an uptick in iBeacon users, Apple’s latest iOS update automatically turns Bluetooth on for users." 

    "Arguably the biggest benefit of beacons is the ability to simultaneously collect first-party data at scale with location-based data. Essentially, beacons are an indoor mapping technology allowing brands to track in-store or at-event behavioral data of individuals." 

    edited September 6 jeffharriscgWerks
  • Reply 6 of 13
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,010member
    gatorguy said:
    Yup new iBeacon for retailers too for matching up with the UWB tech in the upcoming iPhones. 

    But what happened to the "old" iBeacon that was initially so well received? Abandoned for the most part today, too many operational problems and potential consumer-side privacy issues. Among them:
    • Few customers have heard of beacons, so most haven’t installed retailer apps
    • Bluetooth has limited range and signals are easily blocked by people and store furniture
    • Customers tend to discontinue app use if they feel they’re being spammed
    • Growing concern about privacy, with apps failing to be upfront about the data they collect.
    Presumably the "new" version will avoid some of those issues, particularly the 2nd one but maybe not much else? Probably gotta wait at least a couple a weeks to find out what the changes are.

    The “old” iBeacon was completely misunderstood. People thought it was an alternative to NFC POS technology and blew its true utility out of proportion. Bluetooth beacons, including iBeacon are still being widely used for what they were designed and intended for. 
  • Reply 7 of 13
    k2kwk2kw Posts: 1,802member
    Another sign of falling sales.   Moving in on the business of a Third party on your platform.   A true Microsoft move.
  • Reply 8 of 13
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 4,874administrator
    k2kw said:
    Another sign of falling sales.   Moving in on the business of a Third party on your platform.   A true Microsoft move.
    Ridiculous. This kind of thing has been going on for over two decades. Besides the eponymous Sherlock, here's an article from 2014 about it, just from that year's WWDC.

    2014: https://www.macworld.com/article/2359422/sherlocked-nine-technologies-apple-disrupted-at-wwdc.html
  • Reply 9 of 13
    k2kw said:
    Another sign of falling sales.   Moving in on the business of a Third party on your platform.   A true Microsoft move.
    Ridiculous. This kind of thing has been going on for over two decades. Besides the eponymous Sherlock, here's an article from 2014 about it, just from that year's WWDC.

    2014: https://www.macworld.com/article/2359422/sherlocked-nine-technologies-apple-disrupted-at-wwdc.html
    And it was a strategy used successfully by IBM, Microsoft and Samsung for many years. Coattail riding.
  • Reply 10 of 13
    k2kw said:
    Another sign of falling sales.   Moving in on the business of a Third party on your platform.   A true Microsoft move.
    Ridiculous. This kind of thing has been going on for over two decades. Besides the eponymous Sherlock, here's an article from 2014 about it, just from that year's WWDC.

    2014: https://www.macworld.com/article/2359422/sherlocked-nine-technologies-apple-disrupted-at-wwdc.html

    Idk if I’d call it ridiculous.  The makers of Astropad and Luna might disagree. 

    Sure Apple has done this rarely in the past - as have others. But prior counts doesn’t excuse it every time thereafter. 

    Its a pretty rough deal. 

    If Apple wants to buy them out or license? Cool. But when they instead say “hey, cool idea!” And then just steal it. Not cool. 
    edited September 7
  • Reply 11 of 13
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,296member
    So, am I understanding correctly that all these iPhones are going to detect these trackers and then send that data to Apple, so Apple can sell trackers and the feature? I'm guessing Apple won't be paying us for using our data plans and such? Or, does it only interact with fixed beacon devices that have to be installed places (in which case, pshew!, but also then it wouldn't be all that useful, it seems)?

    gatorguy said:
    Thankfully, and likely in anticipation of an uptick in iBeacon users, Apple’s latest iOS update automatically turns Bluetooth on for users." 
    Yeah, so helpful they are, huh? ;)

    That's why I now have to not use Control Center and take the extra steps to go in and really turn them off (until they take that ability away, too?). And, I have to help family members as well, as Apple's "new and improved" implantation has done a good job of tricking them. For them, the problem is more often battery drain, as they don't realize BT and WiFi keep turning back on (or, better, were never really off... tricked by a super-bad UI).
  • Reply 12 of 13
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,277member
    If Apple's trackers give me what I want I'm moving us off Tile.   Tile is selling accounts which offer 

    1. Smart Alerts 
    2. Free Battery Replacement 
    3. Location History 
    4. Unlimited Sharing 
    5. Extended Warranty and Premium customer care 

    None of these address my family's issues.  We need. 

    1. A single Tile family account in which the Admins (parents) can find any device 
    2. Better location sensing.  I'd like to see something like what Trackr was working on by having BT plugs that could 
    tell you if your device was upstairs/downstair etc. 
    3. Tracker pairing to devices like Apple TV (which I have in 3 rooms) thus if Bluetooth is off on my phone it doesn't matter 
    4. Tracker clustering.   Ensuring a set of devices are all together (i.e Keys, wallet, handbag etc) 


  • Reply 13 of 13
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 21,105member
    k2kw said:
    Another sign of falling sales.   Moving in on the business of a Third party on your platform.   A true Microsoft move.
    I don't really agree, it's just an inevitable result of big tech with immensely deep pockets. They can play around in any market they wish. Google has built a product that seems to be a Tile competitor too. A device with description of "Bluetooth Tag" passed thru the thru the FCC approval process back in June, so I would not be shocked to see their Tile competition revealed and ready for market a couple weeks after Apple does tomorrow.  

    I'm sure it won't help dispense with the antitrust chatter as hugely profitable tech companies intrude further into any and all innovative nd potentially profitable markets. Said to say I am now tending to believe that big tech really does need to be reined in to prevent three or four companies from pretty much controlling the entire consumer technology market, certainly the bulk of any profits and success.

    IMHO a real-life Umbrella Corporation is a distinct possibility if we allow things to progress without controls. 
    edited September 9
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