Antitrust committee demands Apple, Amazon, Facebook & Google internal documents

Posted:
in General Discussion edited September 2019
The House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee has sent letters requesting internal documentation and correspondence from four major tech giants in the US, including Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook.

House an


The letter to Apple begins, "The House Judiciary Committee is investigating competition into digital markets. The focus of this bipartisan investigation is to examine (1) competition problems in digital markets; (2) whether dominant firms are engaging in anti-competitive conduct online; and (3) whether existing antitrust laws, competition policies, and current enforcement levels are adequate to address these issues."

The letter goes on to probe Apple for information about a few different issues. Perhaps one of the most well known, the House plans to investigate Apple's alleged "Sherlocking" of third-party developers. Sherlocking is a practice in which Apple adopts a concept into their products that was previously only available via a third-party developer. Sidecar, for instance, is a popular take on concepts originally developed by third-party developers like Duet Display and Luna Display.

The committee has asked for emails from or to "relevant executives" regarding Apple's crackdown on parental control apps.

The antitrust committee is also asking for information related to how Apple manages the App Store. Information requested includes Apple's policy of third-party payment systems, Apple's revenue-share policy for in-app purchases, and whether or not users can choose non-Apple apps as default apps.

The other tech companies are also facing their own set of investigations.

The probe into Amazon is investigating whether or not Amazon has unfairly given an advantage to its Amazons Basic brands, as well as whether or not Amazon has attempted to create a monopoly on the book retail market.

Alphabet, Google's parent company, faces questions about its search algorithms, and whether or not it's managed to create a monopoly in search and advertising.

Facebook is, once again, being probed about data collection. However, the primary focus of the investigation is to discover whether its acquisition of competitors WhatsApp and Instagram had allowed them to establish unfair advantages in both the instant messaging and image sharing markets.

The ultimate goal is for the committee to establish whether the companies have created an environment that is actively hostile to competitors.
«1

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 26
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,319member
    The House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee has sent letters requesting internal documentation and correspondence from four major tech giants in the US, including Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook.

    House an


    The letter to Apple begins, "The House Judiciary Committee is investigating competition into digital markets. The focus of this bipartisan investigation is to examine (1) competition problems in digital markets; (2) whether dominant firms are engaging in anti-competitive conduct online; and (3) whether existing antitrust laws, competition policies, and current enforcement levels are adequate to address these issues."

    The letter goes on to probe Apple for information about a few different issues. Perhaps one of the most well known, the House plans to investigate Apple's alleged "Sherlocking" of third-party developers. Sherlocking is a practice in which Apple adopts a concept into their products that was previously only available via a third-party developer. Sidecar, for instance, is a popular take on concepts originally developed by third-party developers like Duet Display and Luna Display.

    The committee has asked for emails from or to "relevant executives" regarding Apple's crackdown on parental control apps.

    The antitrust committee is also asking for information related to how Apple manages the App Store. Information requested includes Apple's policy of third-party payment systems, Apple's revenue-share policy for in-app purchases, and whether or not users can choose non-Apple apps as default apps.

    The other tech companies are also facing their own set of investigations.

    The probe into Amazon is investigating whether or not Amazon has unfairly given an advantage to its Amazons Basic brands, as well as whether or not Amazon has attempted to create a monopoly on the book retail market.

    Alphabet, Google's parent company, faces questions about its search algorithms, and whether or not it's managed to create a monopoly in search and advertising.

    Facebook is, once again, being probed about data collection. However, the primary focus of the investigation is to discover whether its acquisition of competitors WhatsApp and Instagram had allowed them to establish unfair advantages in both the instant messaging and image sharing markets.

    The ultimate goal is for the committee to establish whether the companies have created an environment that is actively hostile to competitors.
    Well of course they have, tho I don't think illegally so. 
  • Reply 2 of 26
    Perhaps at the end game, it is not external competitions that kill US tech firms but internal politics.

    Samsung and Huawei may have the last laugh when the forced-breakup does happen on US tech giants.
    anantksundaramAppleExposed
  • Reply 3 of 26
    Absurd
    edited September 2019 watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 26
    Phobos7 said:
    My hopes are that Apple doesn’t give them one page.
    LAWMAKERS.....Don’t you have other things to do????FANG is dominant because of their own talent resources.....Unfairly treat compared to Samsung and Huawei
    Phobos7AppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 26
    The antitrust committee is also asking for information related to how Apple manages the App Store. Information requested includes Apple's policy of third-party payment systems, Apple's revenue-share policy for in-app purchases, and whether or not users can choose non-Apple apps as default apps.
    WOW, The House Judiciary Committee is doing something besides impeachment. Unimaginable...

    Sounds like a Spotify complaint regarding the HomePod...

    AppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 26
    Wow.  If you want to see the worst homework assignment ever, read the letter in its entirety:  https://judiciary.house.gov/sites/democrats.judiciary.house.gov/files/documents/Apple%20RFI%20-%20Signed.pdf

    I especially liked these bits:

    They lead off with a couple softballs:  "[Submit] the most recent org chart..."  "[Submit] a description of each of the products and services listed below [because we can't be bothered to read your website.]

    Then it gets more challenging:
    "[Submit] all information--whether created by the Company of a third party--regarding the US market share of the Company and each of the Company's competitors in any market in which the Company offers or sells the following products or services [followed by a list of 12 Apple products and technologies]."

    "[Submit] all financial statements prepared on an annual or quarterly basis ... since 2016 including profit-and-loss reports for each of the Company's products and services listed below [same list of 12 things].  If the Company does not prepare or maintain financial statements ... for the above-listed products or services ... the Company should submit the revenues, cost, and expenses for each product or service listed and use its best efforts to provide a profit-and-loss statement for each product or service."  [Apple's competitors and financial analysts will love this.]

    Then they request all communications with a bunch of senior executives for the past decade on dozens of topics.  

    And in the instructions they clarify that the rules don't apply to them:

    "In responding to the request be apprised that ... the Committee does not recognize: any purported non-disclosure privileges associated with the common law including, but not limited to, the deliberative-process privilege, the attorney-client privilege, and attorney work product protections; any purported privileges and protections from disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act; or any purported contractual privileges, such as non-disclosure agreements."

    This one letter will literally cost Apple a few million dollars.
    edited September 2019 gatorguyCarnage
  • Reply 7 of 26
    Wow.  If you want to see the worst homework assignment ever, read the letter in its entirety:  https://judiciary.house.gov/sites/democrats.judiciary.house.gov/files/documents/Apple%20RFI%20-%20Signed.pdf

    I especially liked these bits:

    They lead off with a couple softballs:  "[Submit] the most recent org chart..."  "[Submit] a description of each of the products and services listed below [because we can't be bothered to read your website.]

    Then it gets more challenging:
    "[Submit] all information--whether created by the Company of a third party--regarding the US market share of the Company and each of the Company's competitors in any market in which the Company offers or sells the following products or services [followed by a list of 12 Apple products and technologies]."

    "[Submit] all financial statements prepared on an annual or quarterly basis ... since 2016 including profit-and-loss reports for each of the Company's products and services listed below [same list of 12 things].  If the Company does not prepare or maintain financial statements ... for the above-listed products or services ... the Company should submit the revenues, cost, and expenses for each product or service listed and use its best efforts to provide a profit-and-loss statement for each product or service."  [Apple's competitors and financial analysts will love this.]

    Then they request all communications with a bunch of senior executives for the past decade on dozens of topics.  

    And in the instructions they clarify that the rules don't apply to them:

    "In responding to the request be apprised that ... the Committee does not recognize: any purported non-disclosure privileges associated with the common law including, but not limited to, the deliberative-process privilege, the attorney-client privilege, and attorney work product protections; any purported privileges and protections from disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act; or any purported contractual privileges, such as non-disclosure agreements."

    This one letter will literally cost Apple a few million dollars.
    Tell them to go pound sand. Where is it in our laws that requires an entity to generate all of this information?
    AppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 26
    Cause we ain't making money off you, we suspect you are doing something wrong, please provide the evidence to support our claim.

    Meanwhile Ajit Pai is green lighting a huge cell provider merger so his hometown gets 5G and Scott Pruit is underling the EPA so all of the administration oil cronies can make even more profits.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 26
    cornchipcornchip Posts: 1,870member
    So grocery stores will no longer be able to have store brands that are essentially the exact same thing but cheaper?

    edit - oh only applies to tech ... because...
    edited September 2019 lkruppAppleExposedjbdragonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 26
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,319member
    mobird said:
    Wow.  If you want to see the worst homework assignment ever, read the letter in its entirety:  https://judiciary.house.gov/sites/democrats.judiciary.house.gov/files/documents/Apple%20RFI%20-%20Signed.pdf

    I especially liked these bits:

    They lead off with a couple softballs:  "[Submit] the most recent org chart..."  "[Submit] a description of each of the products and services listed below [because we can't be bothered to read your website.]

    Then it gets more challenging:
    "[Submit] all information--whether created by the Company of a third party--regarding the US market share of the Company and each of the Company's competitors in any market in which the Company offers or sells the following products or services [followed by a list of 12 Apple products and technologies]."

    "[Submit] all financial statements prepared on an annual or quarterly basis ... since 2016 including profit-and-loss reports for each of the Company's products and services listed below [same list of 12 things].  If the Company does not prepare or maintain financial statements ... for the above-listed products or services ... the Company should submit the revenues, cost, and expenses for each product or service listed and use its best efforts to provide a profit-and-loss statement for each product or service."  [Apple's competitors and financial analysts will love this.]

    Then they request all communications with a bunch of senior executives for the past decade on dozens of topics.  

    And in the instructions they clarify that the rules don't apply to them:

    "In responding to the request be apprised that ... the Committee does not recognize: any purported non-disclosure privileges associated with the common law including, but not limited to, the deliberative-process privilege, the attorney-client privilege, and attorney work product protections; any purported privileges and protections from disclosure under the Freedom of Information Act; or any purported contractual privileges, such as non-disclosure agreements."

    This one letter will literally cost Apple a few million dollars.
    Tell them to go pound sand. Where is it in our laws that requires an entity to generate all of this information?
    Congressional inquiries carry a lot of weight, and congressional subpoenas even more. On top of that I can't imagine Apple being willing to "tell them to pound sand" and invite the kind of attention it would get from Congress and federal regulatory agencies.
  • Reply 11 of 26
    "Sidecar, for instance, is a popular take on concepts originally developed by third-party developers like Duet Display and Luna Display." Not sure this is a very strong example. Duet and Luna took a concept (secondary display) that already existed in the laptop/desktop market and adapted it to the iPad. I don't think you can really make an argument that Apple needed to see what Duet and Luna did in order to understand that a screen on another device could be used in tandem with macOS.
    Phobos7AppleExposedjbdragonrandominternetpersonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 26
    What a stupid, pathetic fishing expedition. These companies are going to have to divulge such important and sensitive information about themselves, their products, markets, and competition, information that is going to be sitting around in government computers and servers. Can you imagine how hackers and industrial spies worldwide must be rubbing their hands in untrammeled glee?

    With a home country government like this, who needs China's IP theft?
    edited September 2019 AppleExposedrandominternetpersonCarnagewatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 26
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,502member
    "Sidecar, for instance, is a popular take on concepts originally developed by third-party developers like Duet Display and Luna Display." Not sure this is a very strong example. Duet and Luna took a concept (secondary display) that already existed in the laptop/desktop market and adapted it to the iPad. I don't think you can really make an argument that Apple needed to see what Duet and Luna did in order to understand that a screen on another device could be used in tandem with macOS.

    Not only that, but Apple itself has an example of using the screen of a device as a secondary screen for another... Target Display Mode on some older iMacs. So, yeah not a very good example.
    AppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 26
    Apple needs to let every national politician understand d how much they have paid to developers since the iPhone was open to developers.  Maybe some information on the growth in the number of developers over the years.  

    There is also a need to help them understand that any political invasion of the Apple environment will only be a huge gift to hackers and those sending out ransom ware.


    AppleExposedkestralwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 26
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,707member
    gatorguy said:
    The House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee has sent letters requesting internal documentation and correspondence from four major tech giants in the US, including Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook.

    House an


    The letter to Apple begins, "The House Judiciary Committee is investigating competition into digital markets. The focus of this bipartisan investigation is to examine (1) competition problems in digital markets; (2) whether dominant firms are engaging in anti-competitive conduct online; and (3) whether existing antitrust laws, competition policies, and current enforcement levels are adequate to address these issues."

    The letter goes on to probe Apple for information about a few different issues. Perhaps one of the most well known, the House plans to investigate Apple's alleged "Sherlocking" of third-party developers. Sherlocking is a practice in which Apple adopts a concept into their products that was previously only available via a third-party developer. Sidecar, for instance, is a popular take on concepts originally developed by third-party developers like Duet Display and Luna Display.

    The committee has asked for emails from or to "relevant executives" regarding Apple's crackdown on parental control apps.

    The antitrust committee is also asking for information related to how Apple manages the App Store. Information requested includes Apple's policy of third-party payment systems, Apple's revenue-share policy for in-app purchases, and whether or not users can choose non-Apple apps as default apps.

    The other tech companies are also facing their own set of investigations.

    The probe into Amazon is investigating whether or not Amazon has unfairly given an advantage to its Amazons Basic brands, as well as whether or not Amazon has attempted to create a monopoly on the book retail market.

    Alphabet, Google's parent company, faces questions about its search algorithms, and whether or not it's managed to create a monopoly in search and advertising.

    Facebook is, once again, being probed about data collection. However, the primary focus of the investigation is to discover whether its acquisition of competitors WhatsApp and Instagram had allowed them to establish unfair advantages in both the instant messaging and image sharing markets.

    The ultimate goal is for the committee to establish whether the companies have created an environment that is actively hostile to competitors.
    Well of course they have, tho I don't think illegally so. 
    But if they go after Apple for this stuff think what they will do to your precious Google.
    AppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 26
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,319member
    lkrupp said:
    gatorguy said:
    The House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee has sent letters requesting internal documentation and correspondence from four major tech giants in the US, including Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook.

    House an


    The letter to Apple begins, "The House Judiciary Committee is investigating competition into digital markets. The focus of this bipartisan investigation is to examine (1) competition problems in digital markets; (2) whether dominant firms are engaging in anti-competitive conduct online; and (3) whether existing antitrust laws, competition policies, and current enforcement levels are adequate to address these issues."

    The letter goes on to probe Apple for information about a few different issues. Perhaps one of the most well known, the House plans to investigate Apple's alleged "Sherlocking" of third-party developers. Sherlocking is a practice in which Apple adopts a concept into their products that was previously only available via a third-party developer. Sidecar, for instance, is a popular take on concepts originally developed by third-party developers like Duet Display and Luna Display.

    The committee has asked for emails from or to "relevant executives" regarding Apple's crackdown on parental control apps.

    The antitrust committee is also asking for information related to how Apple manages the App Store. Information requested includes Apple's policy of third-party payment systems, Apple's revenue-share policy for in-app purchases, and whether or not users can choose non-Apple apps as default apps.

    The other tech companies are also facing their own set of investigations.

    The probe into Amazon is investigating whether or not Amazon has unfairly given an advantage to its Amazons Basic brands, as well as whether or not Amazon has attempted to create a monopoly on the book retail market.

    Alphabet, Google's parent company, faces questions about its search algorithms, and whether or not it's managed to create a monopoly in search and advertising.

    Facebook is, once again, being probed about data collection. However, the primary focus of the investigation is to discover whether its acquisition of competitors WhatsApp and Instagram had allowed them to establish unfair advantages in both the instant messaging and image sharing markets.

    The ultimate goal is for the committee to establish whether the companies have created an environment that is actively hostile to competitors.
    Well of course they have, tho I don't think illegally so. 
    But if they go after Apple for this stuff think what they will do to your precious Google.
    LOL, "my precious..." :)

    The investigation of Google has already been announced, and far more detailed than this little fishing expedition that has you so worried for Apple. This one is a simple congressional inquiry at this point. 

    It doesn't always have to involve "whadabout Google". Detour much?
    edited September 2019 AppleExposedCarnage
  • Reply 17 of 26
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,707member
    China now completely owns the U.S. tech market. And people are just starting to realize china now owns the U.S. drug market too. I watched a report a couple of nights ago of how many Americans would die if China choked off our prescription drug imports. It was pointed out that the last U.S. producer of penicillin shut down in 2004. Almost all of our generic prescription drugs are manufactured in China now. People scream about the costs of prescription drugs but imagine the cost if manufacturing was brought back to the U.S.

    But hey, let’s go after Apple, Google, Amazon, Facebook and break them up so Huawei and Samsung can have the smartphone market as well.
    edited September 2019 AppleExposedwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 26
    lame
    edited September 2019
  • Reply 19 of 26
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    lkrupp said:
    China now completely owns the U.S. tech market. And people are just starting to realize china now owns the U.S. drug market too. I watched a report a couple of nights ago of how many Americans would die if China choked off our prescription drug imports. It was pointed out that the last U.S. producer of penicillin shut down in 2004. Almost all of our generic prescription drugs are manufactured in China now. People scream about the costs of prescription drugs but imagine the cost if manufacturing was brought back to the U.S.

    But hey, let’s go after Apple, Google, Amazon, Facebook and break them up so Huawei and Samsung can have the smartphone market as well.

    There's really no respect for American companies and American IP.

    If I was in Congress I'd run out the knockoffs and have them all pay the IP holders if they wanna sell their cheap knockoffs here.

    I'd also shut down Android for IP theft until they invent their own sh** and stop piggybacking off Sun and Apple etc.
    edited September 2019 anantksundaramwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 26
    Awesome. Destroy them all.
    anantksundaram
Sign In or Register to comment.