Editorial: Are Apple's incremental iOS 13 & macOS Catalina updates enough?

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Comments

  • Reply 41 of 51
    jimzipjimzip Posts: 446member
    I watched the recent Apple event with a friend and fellow Apple fan who was very disappointed with the announcements. Like me, he is always waiting for that "Oh, and one more thing..." moment we were treated to so often back in the day. But unlike me, he actually expects that to happen—as in, every time Apple holds an event. I don't and was really happy with what I saw. Sure, the iPads should have been full-screen, but I appreciate the innovation in all their products and know that it's now in the details, not on a podium rising out of the stage. My friend said an Apple watch without a round face was boring and he was done upgrading. He bought a Series 5 last week...
    commentzillawatto_cobra
  • Reply 42 of 51
    DTFline said:
    Wish I could block these articles from DED as the other editorials, like the one about the MS event, was more level headed and a better read. 

    This is just rabid frothing at the mouth.

    How are you being forced to read these, that blocking them is useful? You don't have to click. You really didn't have to create an account and sign in just to tell us you cannot avoid DEDs articles.
    Some people just cannot accept that they have been wrong about Apple, the first Trillion dollar company. Or accept that they have to pay more for a product that does not sell their personal information to the highest bidder, like Google. I've had my iPhone for 5-years and it works better and does more that it ever did, with only one battery replacement. In the meantime, these jokers buy lesser phones every years or every other year and end up paying just as much for a sadder experience and a whole lot of hassle. Oh how reality gets under their skin. These are the same fools who think tax cuts pay for themselves, even when the data doesn't support.

    I say that as I blaze away at work on my 2013 MBP attached to 3-4 Thunderbolt-3 devices and a DisplayPort monitor at 20Gbps. Apple future proofed my Mac which is going on 6-years of very useful life and like my iPhone it still runs the most current OS.
    StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 43 of 51
    jimzip said:
    I watched the recent Apple event with a friend and fellow Apple fan who was very disappointed with the announcements. Like me, he is always waiting for that "Oh, and one more thing..." moment we were treated to so often back in the day. But unlike me, he actually expects that to happen—as in, every time Apple holds an event. I don't and was really happy with what I saw. Sure, the iPads should have been full-screen, but I appreciate the innovation in all their products and know that it's now in the details, not on a podium rising out of the stage. My friend said an Apple watch without a round face was boring and he was done upgrading. He bought a Series 5 last week...
    The biggest WOW moment was the iPhone and these same people were crying about its lack of a keyboard and talking about how it would die a swift death. The iPhone wasn't a thunderclap, it's something that slow rolled into awesome just like most of Apple's products. The genius was staying the course when you're swimming up stream against people who lack vision. None of Apple's products became hits overnight, it just appears that way in hindsight.
    edited October 2019 StrangeDayswatto_cobra
  • Reply 44 of 51
    mcdavemcdave Posts: 1,919member
    No, they’re not.
    They’re too little, too late on team/collaboration and given that’s been the future of business, and consequently, tech for some time even a web-advertising company is kicking their collective/figurative arse.
    The Services focus is good but Pro Services are a no-show and others ‘incremental updates’ are eroding Apple’s occasional glimpses of innovation.
  • Reply 45 of 51
    In the current era operating system bversions are more about the state of the platform at a given time then they are about major paradig=m shifts. Free operating systems delivered by download carry less gravitas than physical media. If it doesn’t break something, I'm for it. Perhaps a way to easily roll back to a previous version at post-install would be of service. The vast majority of users are not beta testers.
    baconstang
  • Reply 46 of 51
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,259member
    It seems that the system software innovations that Apple delights in, as of late, are new emoji's, messaging effects, dark mode, and other fluff. Instead, I'd like to see them making improvements in, what I feel are, more practical and useful applications like Apple Mail, Notes, Contacts, and Calendar.
    New emoji are released by a committee that updates the unicode character set, not Apple. If Apple doesn’t implement the new characters then you get a box. 
    dysamoriawatto_cobra
  • Reply 47 of 51
    slurpy said:
    It seems that the system software innovations that Apple delights in, as of late, are new emoji's, messaging effects, dark mode, and other fluff. Instead, I'd like to see them making improvements in, what I feel are, more practical and useful applications like Apple Mail, Notes, Contacts, and Calendar.
    Stop being completely full of shit.

     I want you to read fully through the below webpages, then come back here to re-read your post, and then tell us that you aren't embarrassed to stand by what you wrote.

    https://www.apple.com/ca/ios/ios-13/features/
    https://www.apple.com/ca/ipados/features/
    https://www.apple.com/ca/macos/catalina/features/

     And that's only 3 of the 5 operating systems they currently manage.

     Stop spitting on the developers that have put millions of collective hours into literally thousands of user facing changes that go into these new releases, with your trollish and ignorant "lol emojis and effects" lies.

    Apparently, I've touched a nerve with you based upon your uncivil reply to my post.

    But, no, I'm not embarrassed by my OPINION at all, nor have I spit on any developers for their efforts. I was simply stating my disappointment that Apple has done very little to improve functionality in four fundamental apps that customers rely on daily.

    For example, I feel that Airmail 3 is far superior to Mail in UI, ease of use, and capabilities (unfortunately it's still a little buggy to be used full time for me). So, I've resorted to adding: SpamSieve, Mailbutler, and MailHub to Mail.

    I find "Fantastical 2" a far more feature rich calendar app to Apple's Calendar. And, "Cardhop" a more complete solution than Apple's Contacts.

    And furthermore to my original point, I have seen Apple add, what I feel is fluff, in Messages (talking emojis, icons, and message effects for example), versus adding, what I feel, are more practical and necessary features like an improved search a la the app "Chatology."

    Fluff is cute, fun, and apparently marketable, but I'm more concerned about practicality and how it can make my work easier.


    muthuk_vanalingambaconstangelijahg
  • Reply 48 of 51
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,259member
    slurpy said:
    It seems that the system software innovations that Apple delights in, as of late, are new emoji's, messaging effects, dark mode, and other fluff. Instead, I'd like to see them making improvements in, what I feel are, more practical and useful applications like Apple Mail, Notes, Contacts, and Calendar.
    Stop being completely full of shit.

     I want you to read fully through the below webpages, then come back here to re-read your post, and then tell us that you aren't embarrassed to stand by what you wrote.

    https://www.apple.com/ca/ios/ios-13/features/
    https://www.apple.com/ca/ipados/features/
    https://www.apple.com/ca/macos/catalina/features/

     And that's only 3 of the 5 operating systems they currently manage.

     Stop spitting on the developers that have put millions of collective hours into literally thousands of user facing changes that go into these new releases, with your trollish and ignorant "lol emojis and effects" lies.

    Apparently, I've touched a nerve with you based upon your uncivil reply to my post.

    But, no, I'm not embarrassed by my OPINION at all, nor have I spit on any developers for their efforts. I was simply stating my disappointment that Apple has done very little to improve functionality in four fundamental apps that customers rely on daily.

    For example, I feel that Airmail 3 is far superior to Mail in UI, ease of use, and capabilities (unfortunately it's still a little buggy to be used full time for me). So, I've resorted to adding: SpamSieve, Mailbutler, and MailHub to Mail.

    I find "Fantastical 2" a far more feature rich calendar app to Apple's Calendar. And, "Cardhop" a more complete solution than Apple's Contacts.

    And furthermore to my original point, I have seen Apple add, what I feel is fluff, in Messages (talking emojis, icons, and message effects for example), versus adding, what I feel, are more practical and necessary features like an improved search a la the app "Chatology."

    Fluff is cute, fun, and apparently marketable, but I'm more concerned about practicality and how it can make my work easier.
    My guy, they just revamped search in Messages, it is vastly improved from iOS 12, so your complaint doesn’t even make sense. And that you completely omitted all of the great new productivity features in iPadOS pretty much yanks the rug out from your “But it’s all fluff!” claim. Nope.  

    As for stock apps not being as feature-rich as third-party speciality apps, this is normal. Stock apps rarely try to be all things to all people, but instead offer many things for most people. The beauty of a software platform is you can deep dive into additional features with a speciality app quite readily. This is not a failing. 
    edited October 2019 watto_cobra
  • Reply 49 of 51
    slurpy said:
    It seems that the system software innovations that Apple delights in, as of late, are new emoji's, messaging effects, dark mode, and other fluff. Instead, I'd like to see them making improvements in, what I feel are, more practical and useful applications like Apple Mail, Notes, Contacts, and Calendar.
    Stop being completely full of shit.

     I want you to read fully through the below webpages, then come back here to re-read your post, and then tell us that you aren't embarrassed to stand by what you wrote.

    https://www.apple.com/ca/ios/ios-13/features/
    https://www.apple.com/ca/ipados/features/
    https://www.apple.com/ca/macos/catalina/features/

     And that's only 3 of the 5 operating systems they currently manage.

     Stop spitting on the developers that have put millions of collective hours into literally thousands of user facing changes that go into these new releases, with your trollish and ignorant "lol emojis and effects" lies.

    Apparently, I've touched a nerve with you based upon your uncivil reply to my post.

    But, no, I'm not embarrassed by my OPINION at all, nor have I spit on any developers for their efforts. I was simply stating my disappointment that Apple has done very little to improve functionality in four fundamental apps that customers rely on daily.

    For example, I feel that Airmail 3 is far superior to Mail in UI, ease of use, and capabilities (unfortunately it's still a little buggy to be used full time for me). So, I've resorted to adding: SpamSieve, Mailbutler, and MailHub to Mail.

    I find "Fantastical 2" a far more feature rich calendar app to Apple's Calendar. And, "Cardhop" a more complete solution than Apple's Contacts.

    And furthermore to my original point, I have seen Apple add, what I feel is fluff, in Messages (talking emojis, icons, and message effects for example), versus adding, what I feel, are more practical and necessary features like an improved search a la the app "Chatology."

    Fluff is cute, fun, and apparently marketable, but I'm more concerned about practicality and how it can make my work easier.
    My guy, they just revamped search in Messages, it is vastly improved from iOS 12, so your complaint doesn’t even make sense. And that you completely omitted all of the great new productivity features in iPadOS pretty much yanks the rug out from your “But it’s all fluff!” claim. Nope.  

    As for stock apps not being as feature-rich as third-party speciality apps, this is normal. Stock apps rarely try to be all things to all people, but instead offer many things for most people. The beauty of a software platform is you can deep dive into additional features with a speciality app quite readily. This is not a failing. 
    I did not say that the updates were all fluff, and I recognize that they aren't. I don't see much of an improvement in the search of Messages in IOS, but I'll look further based on your comment...

    I also understand that stock apps can be less feature-rich than third party speciality apps. But, I still feel that Apple has not improved their stock apps enough over the years. [And, to be fair, I'm mostly focused on desktop apps and (MacOS).]

    However, as an example of improving Apple's existing Mail app in IOS, wouldn't it be great if we could delete multiple emails at once?

    That said, I certainly respect that we have a difference of opinion and appreciate your being civil about your disagreement with me.
    edited October 2019
  • Reply 50 of 51
    nicholfdnicholfd Posts: 806member
    However, as an example of improving Apple's existing Mail app in IOS, wouldn't it be great if we could delete multiple emails at once?

    So you haven't figured out how to tap "Edit", select multiple e-mails, and then tap "Trash?  Maybe you should experiment a little - for as long as I remember, you could delete multiple e-mails at once, in this same manner...
    watto_cobra
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