Editorial: Are Apple's incremental iOS 13 & macOS Catalina updates enough?

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 51
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,006member
    baconstang said:
    It breaks Aperture and that's enough to keep me on Mojave for the foreseeable future.
    How long has Aperture been gone?  Years.  I miss Aperture and I wish Apple brought it back but let it go now.  I've embraced the Lightroom/Photoshop suite and countless others have.  It is what it is.  There's Pixelmator, CaptureOne Pro, Elements, etc... time to move on.  
    macpluspluslolliverwatto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 51
    citpekscitpeks Posts: 193member
    Enough?  The tortured release schedule and fire drill patch releases of iOS 13 thus far suggest that even what was attempted may have already been too much.

    The quality of iOS releases seem to be taking after that of the Star Trek movies -- be wary of the odd numbered ones, with 7, 9, 11, and now 13.
    edited October 2019 dysamoriamattinoz
  • Reply 23 of 51
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,425member
    "In fact, beyond Surface, the only thing to get more reverent adulation from tech media this year was Samsung/Huawei's $2000+ fold phone prototypes that didn't work in the real world at all. It's getting hard to take pundits seriously when they are so overtly out of touch with the reality of the market and what consumers want to buy."

    1. "Out of touch with what consumers want to buy?"

    How about waiting for both phones to actually reach consumers before jumping to conclusions? Both phones are niche phones. Were you under some different impression? Or do you think there is a huge market for first gen $2,000 phones?

    How can you know what consumers want to buy if the products aren't even widely available?

    2. "Huawei's $2000+ fold phone prototypes that didn't work in the real world at all."

    Really? "At all"? Huawei's phone hasn't even been released yet! Where didn't it work in the real world? It hasn't reached the real world! That said, there have been numerous hands ons (and not just a few minutes) and I have yet to see a single Mate X with issues. Opinions are overwhelmingly favourable and they are the daily drivers of the CEOs and numerous employees.

    You clearly want them to fail but at least wait for the Mate X to reach the real world before claiming it didn't work at all and is overly out of touch with what consumers want.
    edited October 2019 elijahgmuthuk_vanalingamphilboogiechemengin1
  • Reply 24 of 51
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,649member
    Not enough advantages to outweigh the loss of 32-bit support for me to update my 2019 iMac. Unfortunately on iOS13 they've updated the reminders and Safari databases so they no longer sync reliably with Mojave.
    baconstang
  • Reply 25 of 51
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,649member
    It seems that the system software innovations that Apple delights in, as of late, are new emoji's, messaging effects, dark mode, and other fluff. Instead, I'd like to see them making improvements in, what I feel are, more practical and useful applications like Apple Mail, Notes, Contacts, and Calendar.
    They just made a bunch of improvements in those areas. And no, Dark Mode is not fluff, it's useful in certain work environments and more importantly it saves batter life.

    iPhones that have an OLED display, and that means you'll need to be using an iPhone X, iPhone XS, or iPhone XS Max. 
    https://www.zdnet.com/article/how-ios-13-will-make-your-battery-last-longer-but-only-if-you-have-a-newer-higher-priced-iphone/
    On the X/Xs/11 Pro it does, on 90% of Apple's devices it does not save any battery. I had to restore my phone from backup as mail just listed everyone as "no sender".
    dysamoria
  • Reply 26 of 51
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,649member

    lkrupp said:
    stupid clickbait title. I already knew the answer considering the author. 


    I’m thrilled that DED gets under the skins of a certain ilk. 
    People without an irrational hatred of Apple fans that're occasionally critical of their favourite company?
    muthuk_vanalingamdysamoria
  • Reply 27 of 51
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,649member
    DED's articles are so lop-sided it's hilarious. His claims with no evidence or sources to back them up (apart from referencing other articles he wrote) and his ridiculous roundabout excuses for Apple's mistakes are absurd. Its quite a contrast since all the other articles posted on AI are generally pretty well balanced. 
    muthuk_vanalingamphilboogiedysamoria
  • Reply 28 of 51
    Rob, Slurpy & SF local:

    I've been looking for a replacement for the past year.  Nothing really strikes me.  I'm NOT doing a subscription.
    Since edits are non-destructive, I don't believe they will carry over to another editor.  I may be wrong about that, but I'd lose all the work on the RAW files. 
    I could export them as JPEGs or TIFFs, but any further work would be on those files, not RAW files.

    And then there's the matter of organization of the photos...

    Aperture shows up in System Profiler as 64 Intel.  Unfortunately it uses some 32 bit processes that are not supported by Catalina.
    philboogiewatto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 51
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,430member
    Journalist junkies for high tech

    In marked contrast, last year when Microsoft trotted out an array of Surface-branded PCs that detached and folded over and pivoted flat into a huge drawing pad next to a wildly new scroll-wheel device, tech columnists climbed up on their chairs and applauded until their fingers bled, then washed it all away with choked-up tears of excitement. The only thing interrupting their prostrating worship of the clever innovations occurring at Microsoft was a demanding insistence to know why the hell Apple wasn't also entertaining them with a circus act of radical new hardware concepts capable of shooting up a technological rush into their veins.
    Haha. Classic DED!
    baconstangcat52watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 51
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,041member
    Not one mention here of security and privacy, two big reasons I promote Apple.
    cat52watto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 51
    mobirdmobird Posts: 709member
    It seems that the system software innovations that Apple delights in, as of late, are new emoji's, messaging effects, dark mode, and other fluff. Instead, I'd like to see them making improvements in, what I feel are, more practical and useful applications like Apple Mail, Notes, Contacts, and Calendar.
    Music.......
  • Reply 32 of 51
    wizard69wizard69 Posts: 13,377member
    IMHO, and for the majority of users of both IOS and MacOS, as long as the updated versions don't break the stuff they normally use then they'll be happy.

    OTOH, there are those who appear to the world at large that they use each and every bit of new tech in every release and complain loudly at each and every thing that they don't like or does not work...

    For MacOS this release will have added 'zest' in that 32bit apps no longer work. This could hit a lot of average users hard. How many really know what apps or parts of apps are 32bit? How many know how to find out what will and what won't work post upgrade?

    That could present a bit problem for Apple. It will probably result in law suits (with no merit naturally) but they will generate publicity.
    I know what will stop me from upgrading for around 3 months. How many who have not tried the Beta releases have taken the trouble to find out? I'll wager that it is not many.
    The reason I’m expecting more updates is that this release of iOS pretty much sucks.    I don’t need a lot of new features in my iPhone, but when Apple breaks what use to work I’m not a happy camper. 

    As for Macs and MacOS I’ve pretty much have given up on Apple for the moment. There has been more negative innovation than positive in the hardware, to the point that $600 laptops can run circles around MBP’s.  The desktop lineup is a complete joke that hasn’t been addressed in over a decade and we have the same negative innovation as seen on laptops.   When an opportunity comes up to innovate they come up with the new Mac Pro which will never sell enough to cover development costs. 
    flyingdpElCapitan
  • Reply 33 of 51
    With DED editorials, you always get one of two things:

    • A detailed, accurate, informative and fascinating historical account of some aspect of IT history, usually with Apple as a central actor.
    • A long, drawn out, highly partisan fluff piece taking potshots at historical Apple enemies, usually Microsoft, Samsung, and Google, containing many tired tropes and setting up various strawmen (ex "Apple gets criticized for not doing enough with X but competitors are praised for doing X - Y")

    Unfortunately, this editorial is firmly in the latter category.

    Still DED is right that Apple is still firmly ahead of competitors in the mobile space.  iPhones are iPads are moving forward with diverse product lines with quality at all points.  Although there are awkward missteps such as the new Reminders app as well as the Catalina release being out of step with iOS 13.

    Where Apple is failing behind is the desktop/laptop space.   I believe this is due to a lack of interest and a sincere wish for desktop users to start using iPads.  This is not an option for those of us who depend on the openness of macOS and the rich system of 3rd party apps, as well as command line environments such as Homebrew.  iOS and even iPadOS are simply not up to the task.  One example is that even with iPadOS, I still can't spell check using only the keyboard, as I can with first party text editing apps on macOS.  The shallow travel keyboard and touch bar are turning off professional users.

    macOS's appeal was as a solid desktop operating system with a Unix command line.  The Windows Linux subsystem brings this functionality to Microsoft's desktop OS.  What's more, Linux distributions keep getting more stable and user friendly.

    Hardware-wise, Dell and Lenovo offer gorgeous laptops that support Linux as well as Windows.  They include pleasant deep travel keyboards with function keys and fingerprint readers.  While the trackpads don't match MacBooks', they're getting better all the time.  They include retina screens.  There's a healthy number of Thunderbolt 3/USB-C ports as well.
    edited October 2019 muthuk_vanalingambaconstangflyingdpphilboogie
  • Reply 34 of 51
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,430member
    78Bandit said:
    Is it too much to ask that we be given more control over our home screens?  Notifications and the widget screen are nice, but I would like to have the ability to pin an active display of just a few apps to the home screen.  Something like the weather, email headers from people in my VIP list, new iMessage summaries, etc.  I know that sounds just like Android widgets and Windows Phone live tiles, but that is pretty much what I would think Apple is capable of with 12 years of development in iOS.
    I couldn’t agree more. Active icons have been on my wish list for awhile. Along with the options to make those icons bigger. Instead of the typical 1x1 size, they could be 2x2, 3x3, 4x4... That would break up the monotony of the aging springboard grid and allow for quick identification of priority apps.
    dysamoria
  • Reply 35 of 51
    It breaks Aperture and that's enough to keep me on Mojave for the foreseeable future.
    Everything that was Aperture is being rolled into Core Imaging and leveraged by Metal.
    lolliverbaconstangcommentzillawatto_cobra
  • Reply 36 of 51
    IMHO, and for the majority of users of both IOS and MacOS, as long as the updated versions don't break the stuff they normally use then they'll be happy.

    OTOH, there are those who appear to the world at large that they use each and every bit of new tech in every release and complain loudly at each and every thing that they don't like or does not work...

    For MacOS this release will have added 'zest' in that 32bit apps no longer work. This could hit a lot of average users hard. How many really know what apps or parts of apps are 32bit? How many know how to find out what will and what won't work post upgrade?

    That could present a bit problem for Apple. It will probably result in law suits (with no merit naturally) but they will generate publicity.
    I know what will stop me from upgrading for around 3 months. How many who have not tried the Beta releases have taken the trouble to find out? I'll wager that it is not many.
    If they used them any at all then they would have received a warning when launched u der Mojave. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 37 of 51
    elijahg said:
    It seems that the system software innovations that Apple delights in, as of late, are new emoji's, messaging effects, dark mode, and other fluff. Instead, I'd like to see them making improvements in, what I feel are, more practical and useful applications like Apple Mail, Notes, Contacts, and Calendar.
    They just made a bunch of improvements in those areas. And no, Dark Mode is not fluff, it's useful in certain work environments and more importantly it saves batter life.

    iPhones that have an OLED display, and that means you'll need to be using an iPhone X, iPhone XS, or iPhone XS Max. 
    https://www.zdnet.com/article/how-ios-13-will-make-your-battery-last-longer-but-only-if-you-have-a-newer-higher-priced-iphone/
    On the X/Xs/11 Pro it does, on 90% of Apple's devices it does not save any battery. I had to restore my phone from backup as mail just listed everyone as "no sender".
    Right, that's what I just said. But this feature will eventually be relevant on all of the iPhones, iPads and computers as they migrate to new screen technology. You'd probably be pissed if you owed on of these phones and they didn't have this feature, as they do on Android. Damed if you do, damned if you don't when future proofing.

    I just updated my iPhone 6S. Zero issues. In fact, I don't think it's every worked so well. Zippy and fluid.
    edited October 2019 muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 38 of 51
    Wish I could block these articles from DED as the other editorials, like the one about the MS event, was more level headed and a better read. 

    This is just rabid frothing at the mouth.
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahgdysamoria
  • Reply 39 of 51
    DTFline said:
    Wish I could block these articles from DED as the other editorials, like the one about the MS event, was more level headed and a better read. 

    This is just rabid frothing at the mouth.
    I've been reading DED going back a decade from Roughly Drafted, we'll way over a decade and he's been right 9 times out of 10. Apple was the first Trillion dollar company and they have been King for over a decade. It won't last forever but if I look back on IBM, Microsoft or Google it's not like any of them are struggling, all have firm markets and continue to make big cash. Apple is the only company that gives the end-to-end experience, sure it's closed garden, but that is a selling point; if I have to download a driver you've failed.
    pcesariwatto_cobra
  • Reply 40 of 51
    DTFline said:
    Wish I could block these articles from DED as the other editorials, like the one about the MS event, was more level headed and a better read. 

    This is just rabid frothing at the mouth.

    How are you being forced to read these, that blocking them is useful? You don't have to click. You really didn't have to create an account and sign in just to tell us you cannot avoid DEDs articles.
    baconstangwatto_cobra
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