Apple releases bug-fix update bringing iOS and iPadOS up to 13.1.3

Posted:
in iOS edited October 2019
Apple has released another incremental update for iOS 13, with the rollout of iOS 13.1.3 to currently-supported iPhones and the iPod Touch alongside iPadOS 13.1.3 for iPads and the iPad Pro.

Craig Federighi announcing iOS 13 at the 2019 WWDC
Craig Federighi announcing iOS 13 at the 2019 WWDC


The update, released on Tuesday, raises the version number of iOS and iPadOS by one more increment to version 13.1.3 from version 13.1.2, which Apple released on September 30. As an incremental update, the release concentrates on providing bug fixes and improvements rather than adding new features.

For iOS, the update addresses an issue that can prevent an iPhone from ringing or vibrating for an incoming call, halts a problem that can prevent a user from opening a meeting invite in Mail, and fixes the Health app where data may not display correctly following the UK clock change from British Summer Time.

The update also fixes a few iCloud Backup-related issues, including one where Voice Memo recordings may not download after a restoration, as well as a more general bug for apps that fail to download after the same procedure. For the Apple Watch, pairing issues and notification problems are also corrected.

Bluetooth is listed under two corrections, including where it disconnects for certain vehicles, while the connection reliability has been improved for Bluetooth hearing aids and headsets. Lastly, it addresses launch performance issues for apps that use Game Center.

For iPadOS, the change list is shorter, consisting of the Mail, iCloud Backup, Bluetooth, and Game Center fixes. As of yet, there are no published CVE entries for the update, suggesting there are no security-related patches being applied at this time.

Weighing in at 108.6MB for iOS upgrades from iOS 13.1.2 and 71.4MB for iPadOS, users can update to the latest iOS and iPadOS release by entering the Settings app, selecting General, Software Update, and selecting to install the update. If users have automatic updates available, this will streamline the process for them.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,472member
    Even I, a committed fanboy, am starting to wonder of what use the developer and public beta programs are. One would think that developers would have the most incentive to test and report issues. As for the public betas I’m betting the percentage of public beta users actually reporting issues is very low. Most of them are just about installing something the public doesn’t have and then bragging about it. They could care less about reporting things. While I’m very glad to get updates I’m less happy about the frequency these days. Supplemental updates, to me, mean important bugs that can’t wait for the point update. That concerns me... a little.
    edited October 2019 redraider11cornchipmwhitetabaksElCapitanbala1234dysamoriaJonInAtlwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 17
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    lkrupp said:
    Even I, a committed fanboy, am starting to wonder of what use the developer and public beta programs are. One would think that developers would have the most incentive to test and report issues. As for the public betas I’m betting the percentage of public beta users actually reporting issues is very low. Most of them are just about installing something the public doesn’t have and then bragging about it. They could care less about reporting things. While I’m very glad to get updates I’m less happy about the frequency these days. Supplemental updates, to me, mean important bugs that can’t wait for the point update. That concerns me... a little.
    The first few public versions of iPad OS were so bad I got tired of submitting bug reports. I spent more time submitting reports than I did actual work. That's not a good thing. A friend of mine told me told me how good it was. I'm thinking all he ever did was boot it up and get on the internet once or twice.

    I know Apple probably gets pounded with bug reports from the Feedback app, but it would be nice to receive some kind of feedback from them every once in a while. There are bugs that are 2-3 years old now that remain (MacOS) that I never heard a damn thing on. Gets to the point where you have to ask yourself how often are they reviewing the feedback they do get?
    mwhitetabaksbonobobdysamoriawatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 17
    razorpit said:
    There are bugs that are 2-3 years old now that remain (MacOS) that I never heard a damn thing on. Gets to the point where you have to ask yourself how often are they reviewing the feedback they do get?
    I think the issue here is that while they might have a crack QA team, they have no power as they are not the magical CEO/QA/Product Owner combination that Steve Jobs was.

    See a bug? Escalate it so that whoever introduced it, needs to fix it R I G H T  N O W. Don't let go until it is fixed. under this CEOQAPO that Steve was, Apple had insane quality, or at least way more than right now. Now we have a non QA/testing slanted non PO guy being the CEO. That guy knows how to make money and to keep the ship going forwards. But he hasn't, as of yet, even created an Executive position for QA. Imagine that, an Executive of Quality Assurance, with the right escalating power, to cut through the siloing that seems to be going on, where teams no longer talk to eachother. Cut through the red tape, and start getting those bugs that have, more or less, been piling on since iOS7 - taken care of, right now.

    This kind of EQA position needs to exist, seriously. Apple needs to stand for insane quality. That quality needs to be assured. Having an EQA with the required amount of escalation power is the only way to get back to Snow Leopard. I still love the way the software+hardware+services work, but.. seriously?
    tabaksretrogustodysamoriaJonInAtl
  • Reply 4 of 17
    However, these updates STILL don't fix the issue where, if you lock down app deletion on iPads, that action REMOVES the Apple TV app from your device! That is such a GLARING and serious bug I'm stumped that this still wasn't fixed! What are they thinking?!

    Yes, I have discussed this BUG with a senior support specialist, we've heavily documented it and included the clips of that behavior but, to no avail so far. 
    edited October 2019 dysamoria
  • Reply 5 of 17
    I think part of the problem is people are examining the betas so intently for the next big thing, that Apple is withholding some stuff, which means that they fork the code. That forked code is then not beta tested. 
  • Reply 6 of 17
    maltzmaltz Posts: 277member
    lkrupp said:
    Even I, a committed fanboy, am starting to wonder of what use the developer and public beta programs are. One would think that developers would have the most incentive to test and report issues. As for the public betas I’m betting the percentage of public beta users actually reporting issues is very low. Most of them are just about installing something the public doesn’t have and then bragging about it. They could care less about reporting things. While I’m very glad to get updates I’m less happy about the frequency these days. Supplemental updates, to me, mean important bugs that can’t wait for the point update. That concerns me... a little.
    A lot of feedback is also likely in the form of telemetry that the software sends back itself, no user interaction required. So even the people just trying it out for the cool factor still do (unwittingly) contribute.
    razorpit
  • Reply 7 of 17
    lkrupp said:
    Even I, a committed fanboy, am starting to wonder of what use the developer and public beta programs are. One would think that developers would have the most incentive to test and report issues. As for the public betas I’m betting the percentage of public beta users actually reporting issues is very low. Most of them are just about installing something the public doesn’t have and then bragging about it. They could care less about reporting things. While I’m very glad to get updates I’m less happy about the frequency these days. Supplemental updates, to me, mean important bugs that can’t wait for the point update. That concerns me... a little.
    The once per year major version release cycle is creating upgrade fatigue all from the developers to the most ardent fanboy. It is not sustainable, and there is not sufficient time to properly resolve issues.

    Also the developers probably never get time to properly relax, and they start introducing bugs and forget issues that should have been corrected or otherwise would have been caught. 

    edited October 2019 razorpitdysamoria
  • Reply 8 of 17
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    lkrupp said:
    Even I, a committed fanboy, am starting to wonder of what use the developer and public beta programs are. One would think that developers would have the most incentive to test and report issues. As for the public betas I’m betting the percentage of public beta users actually reporting issues is very low. Most of them are just about installing something the public doesn’t have and then bragging about it. They could care less about reporting things. While I’m very glad to get updates I’m less happy about the frequency these days. Supplemental updates, to me, mean important bugs that can’t wait for the point update. That concerns me... a little.
    I have to agree: this hasn't been their best set of releases, and I think you're right; people are just downloading the betas and aren't reporting the issues. 

    Perhaps it would be better to forget about the beta cycle and just use the resources for internal testing and bug fixing, instead of administering a beta programme that seems to be resulting in less stable software.
    ElCapitandysamoria
  • Reply 9 of 17
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,691member
    esaruoho said:
    razorpit said:
    There are bugs that are 2-3 years old now that remain (MacOS) that I never heard a damn thing on. Gets to the point where you have to ask yourself how often are they reviewing the feedback they do get?
    I think the issue here is that while they might have a crack QA team, they have no power as they are not the magical CEO/QA/Product Owner combination that Steve Jobs was.

    See a bug? Escalate it so that whoever introduced it, needs to fix it R I G H T  N O W. Don't let go until it is fixed. under this CEOQAPO that Steve was, Apple had insane quality, or at least way more than right now. Now we have a non QA/testing slanted non PO guy being the CEO. That guy knows how to make money and to keep the ship going forwards. But he hasn't, as of yet, even created an Executive position for QA. Imagine that, an Executive of Quality Assurance, with the right escalating power, to cut through the siloing that seems to be going on, where teams no longer talk to eachother. Cut through the red tape, and start getting those bugs that have, more or less, been piling on since iOS7 - taken care of, right now.

    This kind of EQA position needs to exist, seriously. Apple needs to stand for insane quality. That quality needs to be assured. Having an EQA with the required amount of escalation power is the only way to get back to Snow Leopard. I still love the way the software+hardware+services work, but.. seriously?
    Ah yes, back when Jobs was alive and there were zero bugs in any of their software. I can see it just like it was yester— oh wait, that was never even close to true. 
    mike1StrangeDayschiawatto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 17
    Can anyone else confirm a bug in iOS 13 in Messages? I cannot send a message as SMS now if the user has an iMessage account. I have one contact that has a Mac and can receive iMessage to it, But their phone is android. Previously, if they sent me a text from the phone , I could reply as SMS. If they sent from Mac, I could reply as iMessage. If something went by iMessage by mistake, I could long press and select "Send as Text Message' Thats gone now, and even if i try send as SMS by picking their number the very second i click in the text input box, it goes to iMessage automatically. I now have to text them from Messages on my Mac, which allows me to send it as SMS via the phone. Other SMS only if fine, just odd that this feature is gone from the menu.
    dysamoria
  • Reply 11 of 17
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,332member
    lkrupp said:
    Even I, a committed fanboy, am starting to wonder of what use the developer and public beta programs are. One would think that developers would have the most incentive to test and report issues. As for the public betas I’m betting the percentage of public beta users actually reporting issues is very low. Most of them are just about installing something the public doesn’t have and then bragging about it. They could care less about reporting things. While I’m very glad to get updates I’m less happy about the frequency these days. Supplemental updates, to me, mean important bugs that can’t wait for the point update. That concerns me... a little.
    See, finally you’re beginning to listen to what everyone else is saying. 

    I have reported plenty of issues with iOS and MacOS, but only once have I ever had a reply from engineering. I responded to them and heard nothing more, and afaik the bug was never fixed. A few times I’ve had issues closed because they’re apparently duplicates, but then no update on whether the original issue has ever been resolved. I’ve had tickets open for literally years with “awaiting response.” So now I just don’t bother wasting my time reporting. 
    razorpitdysamoria
  • Reply 12 of 17
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,583member
    LOLing at all the users who think bugs never existed before Tim Cook. Don’t ever change, boys. 

    Going back to my job tomorrow morning, fixing bugs for household name brands since the 1990s — supposedly before bugs existed!
    chialkrupp
  • Reply 13 of 17
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,583member
    BTW - kudos to AI for implanting a night mode skin to the forums!
    chialkrupp
  • Reply 14 of 17
    A lot of feedback is also likely in the form of telemetry that the software sends back itself, no user interaction required. So even the people just trying it out for the cool factor still do (unwittingly) contribute.
    I have not participated in any of the public beta programs, but for all of my devices running public releases, I always enable the telemetry reporting features. But for the public betas, is it also an OPTION to have the telemetry enabled? I would think that this telemetry would always be on, and the beta user would not have the option to disable it. Otherwise, what’s the point?  Submitting bug reports is tedious and takes time, and people like my son just run it to see what’s coming next.  He has never documented any bugs. 
  • Reply 15 of 17
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member
    esaruoho said:
    razorpit said:
    There are bugs that are 2-3 years old now that remain (MacOS) that I never heard a damn thing on. Gets to the point where you have to ask yourself how often are they reviewing the feedback they do get?
    I think the issue here is that while they might have a crack QA team, they have no power as they are not the magical CEO/QA/Product Owner combination that Steve Jobs was.

    See a bug? Escalate it so that whoever introduced it, needs to fix it R I G H T  N O W. Don't let go until it is fixed. under this CEOQAPO that Steve was, Apple had insane quality, or at least way more than right now. Now we have a non QA/testing slanted non PO guy being the CEO. That guy knows how to make money and to keep the ship going forwards. But he hasn't, as of yet, even created an Executive position for QA. Imagine that, an Executive of Quality Assurance, with the right escalating power, to cut through the siloing that seems to be going on, where teams no longer talk to eachother. Cut through the red tape, and start getting those bugs that have, more or less, been piling on since iOS7 - taken care of, right now.

    This kind of EQA position needs to exist, seriously. Apple needs to stand for insane quality. That quality needs to be assured. Having an EQA with the required amount of escalation power is the only way to get back to Snow Leopard. I still love the way the software+hardware+services work, but.. seriously?
    Ah yes, back when Jobs was alive and there were zero bugs in any of their software. I can see it just like it was yester— oh wait, that was never even close to true. 
    Strawman argument. Of course there were bugs. Some were even bad. However, the state of things today is definitely WORSE than the state of things back then. Serious usability bugs introduced by iOS 7 are STILL present (unless someone wants to confirm that the iOS 7 Safari text edit view bugs have been finally fixed in iOS 13; I’ve refused to “upgrade” for now).
  • Reply 16 of 17
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,430member

    LOLing at all the users who think bugs never existed before Tim Cook. Don’t ever change, boys. 

    Going back to my job tomorrow morning, fixing bugs for household name brands since the 1990s — supposedly before bugs existed!
    Sigh. See my reply to fastasleep...
  • Reply 17 of 17
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    dysamoria said:
    esaruoho said:
    razorpit said:
    There are bugs that are 2-3 years old now that remain (MacOS) that I never heard a damn thing on. Gets to the point where you have to ask yourself how often are they reviewing the feedback they do get?
    I think the issue here is that while they might have a crack QA team, they have no power as they are not the magical CEO/QA/Product Owner combination that Steve Jobs was.

    See a bug? Escalate it so that whoever introduced it, needs to fix it R I G H T  N O W. Don't let go until it is fixed. under this CEOQAPO that Steve was, Apple had insane quality, or at least way more than right now. Now we have a non QA/testing slanted non PO guy being the CEO. That guy knows how to make money and to keep the ship going forwards. But he hasn't, as of yet, even created an Executive position for QA. Imagine that, an Executive of Quality Assurance, with the right escalating power, to cut through the siloing that seems to be going on, where teams no longer talk to eachother. Cut through the red tape, and start getting those bugs that have, more or less, been piling on since iOS7 - taken care of, right now.

    This kind of EQA position needs to exist, seriously. Apple needs to stand for insane quality. That quality needs to be assured. Having an EQA with the required amount of escalation power is the only way to get back to Snow Leopard. I still love the way the software+hardware+services work, but.. seriously?
    Ah yes, back when Jobs was alive and there were zero bugs in any of their software. I can see it just like it was yester— oh wait, that was never even close to true. 
    Strawman argument. Of course there were bugs. Some were even bad. However, the state of things today is definitely WORSE than the state of things back then. Serious usability bugs introduced by iOS 7 are STILL present (unless someone wants to confirm that the iOS 7 Safari text edit view bugs have been finally fixed in iOS 13; I’ve refused to “upgrade” for now).
    Are you saying you are on iOS 6?

    I’ve noticed some odd text edit view bugs, but nothing bad enough to keep me on a 7 year old version of iOS. Things are bad, but not that bad.
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