Apple advises iPhone 5 owners to update to iOS 10.3.4 by November 3

Posted:
in iPhone
Apple has started to warn owners of the iPhone 5 to update their devices from their current iOS version to iOS 10.3.4 by November 3 to continue using the App Store and iCloud, or face updating only by performing a backup and restore with a Mac or PC beyond that date.




Apple issued an update in July bringing some older models of iPhone and iPad to iOS 10.3.4, including the iPhone 5 with the release fixing an issue with GPS. A GPS time rollover issue started to affect products from other manufacturers equipped with GPS on April 6, but Apple's affected devices are not impacted by the problem until just before midnight UTC on November 3, 2019.

In alerts sent out to iPhone 5 owners by Apple, reports 9to5Mac, Apple warns of the need to update to iOS 10.3.4 before the cutoff date to "continue using App Store, iCloud, email, web, and other services." If updates are not performed in time, users "will be required to back up and restore using a Mac or PC in order to update because over-the-air software updates and iCloud Backup will not work."

The alert also offers links to update immediately or to find out more information. An update to the support pages published on Saturday explains the GPS time rollover affects multiple Apple products, which then prompted the release of an update for older iOS version numbers.

The full list of devices affected and needing updates are the aforementioned iPhone 5 and the fourth-generation iPad with Wi-Fi and Cellular needing to be updated to iOS 10.3.4. The iPhone 4s, first-generation iPad mini Wi-Fi and Cellular, iPad 2 with Wi-Fi and CDMA Cellular, and the third-generation iPad with Wi-Fi and Cellular should be updated to iOS 9.3.6.

The issue does not affect iPod touch models or iPad models with Wi-Fi only, nor newer iOS models.

Despite listing multiple models that are affected, the issue is only really a problem for the iPhone 5, as Apple explains it needs the update to "maintain an accurate GPS location and to continue to use functions that rely on the correct date and time." It also appears the iPhone 5 is the only model to be affected in such a way that an update post-November 3 would mandate using the PC and Mac-based back up and restore procedure.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    I'm a little confused by this.   I thought Apple had halted updates to the iPhone 5 last September (2018).   Is it still getting updates?   Or maybe just security updates?
  • Reply 2 of 21
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,506member
    Thank you Apple. You don't leave years old iPhone users behind. That is the difference.
    caladaniandesignrwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 21
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,506member
    I'm a little confused by this.   I thought Apple had halted updates to the iPhone 5 last September (2018).   Is it still getting updates?   Or maybe just security updates?
    Because Apple is not Android OS or Android phone maker.
    macseekerAppleExposedrazorpitwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 21
    I'm a little confused by this.   I thought Apple had halted updates to the iPhone 5 last September (2018).   Is it still getting updates?   Or maybe just security updates?
    Special update for GPS issue.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 21
    wood1208 said:
    I'm a little confused by this.   I thought Apple had halted updates to the iPhone 5 last September (2018).   Is it still getting updates?   Or maybe just security updates?
    Because Apple is not Android OS or Android phone maker.
    Well, they aren't -- but, in this case, Android and Apple work about the same.  Google updates its systems but, at least partly because so many phones are using customized versions of the code many of those phones have to be updated by the carrier -- which doesn't happen.   Actually the best of the two is neither -- it is Microsoft:   I'm typing this on a 10 year old machine running the latest version of Windows -- and I have even older machines running current versions as well.

    But, none of that answered my original question of:  "What is Apple's policy regarding outdated equipment?  I thought they had halted updates to the iPhone 5."
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 6 of 21
    wood1208 said:
    I'm a little confused by this.   I thought Apple had halted updates to the iPhone 5 last September (2018).   Is it still getting updates?   Or maybe just security updates?
    Because Apple is not Android OS or Android phone maker.
    Well, they aren't -- but, in this case, Android and Apple work about the same.  Google updates its systems but, at least partly because so many phones are using customized versions of the code many of those phones have to be updated by the carrier -- which doesn't happen.   Actually the best of the two is neither -- it is Microsoft:   I'm typing this on a 10 year old machine running the latest version of Windows -- and I have even older machines running current versions as well.

    But, none of that answered my original question of:  "What is Apple's policy regarding outdated equipment?  I thought they had halted updates to the iPhone 5."
    This is an up date to keep time accurate.  GPS is used for time.  Security (signing, certificates, etc.) all require accurate time, or things like the App Store, iCloud, etc., do not work.  This update fixes a GPS time issue because GPS' have "rollovers" where some hardware/software may have bugs, or did not considered the devices being in use this long.  Without this update, the device date/time will be wrong and secure stuff will break (App Store, iCloud, iMessage, secure e-mail, etc.)
    GeorgeBMacmuthuk_vanalingamtmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 21
    nicholfd said:
    wood1208 said:
    I'm a little confused by this.   I thought Apple had halted updates to the iPhone 5 last September (2018).   Is it still getting updates?   Or maybe just security updates?
    Because Apple is not Android OS or Android phone maker.
    Well, they aren't -- but, in this case, Android and Apple work about the same.  Google updates its systems but, at least partly because so many phones are using customized versions of the code many of those phones have to be updated by the carrier -- which doesn't happen.   Actually the best of the two is neither -- it is Microsoft:   I'm typing this on a 10 year old machine running the latest version of Windows -- and I have even older machines running current versions as well.

    But, none of that answered my original question of:  "What is Apple's policy regarding outdated equipment?  I thought they had halted updates to the iPhone 5."
    This is an up date to keep time accurate.  GPS is used for time.  Security (signing, certificates, etc.) all require accurate time, or things like the App Store, iCloud, etc., do not work.  This update fixes a GPS time issue because GPS' have "rollovers" where some hardware/software may have bugs, or did not considered the devices being in use this long.  Without this update, the device date/time will be wrong and secure stuff will break (App Store, iCloud, iMessage, secure e-mail, etc.)
    Thanks!
    So, if I get this correctly:   Apple will, at their discretion, produce critical updates in order to prevent the products from stopping completely -- but no functional or security updates?
    curtis hannah
  • Reply 8 of 21
    auxioauxio Posts: 2,244member
    nicholfd said:
    wood1208 said:
    I'm a little confused by this.   I thought Apple had halted updates to the iPhone 5 last September (2018).   Is it still getting updates?   Or maybe just security updates?
    Because Apple is not Android OS or Android phone maker.
    Well, they aren't -- but, in this case, Android and Apple work about the same.  Google updates its systems but, at least partly because so many phones are using customized versions of the code many of those phones have to be updated by the carrier -- which doesn't happen.   Actually the best of the two is neither -- it is Microsoft:   I'm typing this on a 10 year old machine running the latest version of Windows -- and I have even older machines running current versions as well.

    But, none of that answered my original question of:  "What is Apple's policy regarding outdated equipment?  I thought they had halted updates to the iPhone 5."
    This is an up date to keep time accurate.  GPS is used for time.  Security (signing, certificates, etc.) all require accurate time, or things like the App Store, iCloud, etc., do not work.  This update fixes a GPS time issue because GPS' have "rollovers" where some hardware/software may have bugs, or did not considered the devices being in use this long.  Without this update, the device date/time will be wrong and secure stuff will break (App Store, iCloud, iMessage, secure e-mail, etc.)
    Thanks!
    So, if I get this correctly:   Apple will, at their discretion, produce critical updates in order to prevent the products from stopping completely -- but no functional or security updates?
    If you’re looking for an “official company policy” for this, I’m fairly certain there isn’t one. Apple just “did the right thing” in this case to ensure users with old iPhones could still access iCloud, App Store, and other services. Which is pretty critical to the phone’s usefulness.
    GeorgeBMacmuthuk_vanalingamcurtis hannahwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 21
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,278member
    auxio said:
    nicholfd said:
    wood1208 said:
    I'm a little confused by this.   I thought Apple had halted updates to the iPhone 5 last September (2018).   Is it still getting updates?   Or maybe just security updates?
    Because Apple is not Android OS or Android phone maker.
    Well, they aren't -- but, in this case, Android and Apple work about the same.  Google updates its systems but, at least partly because so many phones are using customized versions of the code many of those phones have to be updated by the carrier -- which doesn't happen.   Actually the best of the two is neither -- it is Microsoft:   I'm typing this on a 10 year old machine running the latest version of Windows -- and I have even older machines running current versions as well.

    But, none of that answered my original question of:  "What is Apple's policy regarding outdated equipment?  I thought they had halted updates to the iPhone 5."
    This is an up date to keep time accurate.  GPS is used for time.  Security (signing, certificates, etc.) all require accurate time, or things like the App Store, iCloud, etc., do not work.  This update fixes a GPS time issue because GPS' have "rollovers" where some hardware/software may have bugs, or did not considered the devices being in use this long.  Without this update, the device date/time will be wrong and secure stuff will break (App Store, iCloud, iMessage, secure e-mail, etc.)
    Thanks!
    So, if I get this correctly:   Apple will, at their discretion, produce critical updates in order to prevent the products from stopping completely -- but no functional or security updates?
    If you’re looking for an “official company policy” for this, I’m fairly certain there isn’t one. Apple just “did the right thing” in this case to ensure users with old iPhones could still access iCloud, App Store, and other services. Which is pretty critical to the phone’s usefulness.
    Got it!  Thanks!

  • Reply 10 of 21
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,215member
    I use my iPhone 4 as an iPod, without cellular enabled. Does this issue impact me?
  • Reply 11 of 21
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 543member
    I'm a little confused by this.   I thought Apple had halted updates to the iPhone 5 last September (2018).   Is it still getting updates?   Or maybe just security updates?
    Obviously not entirely hence this functional update. 
  • Reply 12 of 21
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 543member
    dysamoria said:
    I use my iPhone 4 as an iPod, without cellular enabled. Does this issue impact me?
     I: the gps functions for communication purposes such as app purchases etc. over the air. If your using your device as a passive player nothing will change. 
    muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 21
    AppleExposedAppleExposed Posts: 1,805unconfirmed, member
    How many iKnockoffs have surpassed 7... scratched that, 5 years of use?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 21
    Well when they do updates to devices that are 7 years old, that telling of their commitment. Glad to see it come to my iPhone 5, though I hardly use it anymore, it’s a nice backup to have and maintain functionality.
    dedgeckowatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 21
    blah64blah64 Posts: 986member
    JFC_PA said:
    dysamoria said:
    I use my iPhone 4 as an iPod, without cellular enabled. Does this issue impact me?
     I: the gps functions for communication purposes such as app purchases etc. over the air. If your using your device as a passive player nothing will change. 
    What do you mean by "passive player"?

    I too have multiple iPhones that have no cellular, but they're well-used devices, which are used to purchase apps, take notes, play games, take photos and send email.  All via wifi.

    It's still unclear to me whether these devices, which run the gamut from 4s through 8 are impacted.  A couple points:

    I do not have, and never have had, GPS or location features enabled on any of the devices.  I fail to see the relationship between GPS functionality (which I know can help with very tiny time offsets) and something like a date/time check to ensure that a certificate is valid.

    More elucidation would be great.  Anyone?
    dysamoria
  • Reply 16 of 21
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    wood1208 said:
    I'm a little confused by this.   I thought Apple had halted updates to the iPhone 5 last September (2018).   Is it still getting updates?   Or maybe just security updates?
    Because Apple is not Android OS or Android phone maker.
    Well, they aren't -- but, in this case, Android and Apple work about the same.  Google updates its systems but, at least partly because so many phones are using customized versions of the code many of those phones have to be updated by the carrier -- which doesn't happen.   Actually the best of the two is neither -- it is Microsoft:   I'm typing this on a 10 year old machine running the latest version of Windows -- and I have even older machines running current versions as well.

    But, none of that answered my original question of:  "What is Apple's policy regarding outdated equipment?  I thought they had halted updates to the iPhone 5."
    My wife is in the other room using a 2006 MBP as I type this. It’s not the most current version of Mac OS but still better than Windows 10.
    dysamoriawatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 21
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,215member
    razorpit said:
    ...Microsoft:   I'm typing this on a 10 year old machine running the latest version of Windows -- and I have even older machines running current versions as well.
    My wife is in the other room using a 2006 MBP as I type this. It’s not the most current version of Mac OS but still better than Windows 10.
    I still use a 2009 MacBook Pro. It’s maxed on memory, has an SSD, and is in perfect condition. It also runs High Sierra, despite Apple abandoning it prior to Sierra, thanks to dosdude1’s installer hacks.
    http://dosdude1.com/highsierra/
    edited October 2019 watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 21
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,215member
    blah64 said:
    JFC_PA said:
    dysamoria said:
    I use my iPhone 4 as an iPod, without cellular enabled. Does this issue impact me?
     I: the gps functions for communication purposes such as app purchases etc. over the air. If your using your device as a passive player nothing will change. 
    What do you mean by "passive player"?

    I too have multiple iPhones that have no cellular, but they're well-used devices, which are used to purchase apps, take notes, play games, take photos and send email.  All via wifi.

    It's still unclear to me whether these devices, which run the gamut from 4s through 8 are impacted.  A couple points:

    I do not have, and never have had, GPS or location features enabled on any of the devices.  I fail to see the relationship between GPS functionality (which I know can help with very tiny time offsets) and something like a date/time check to ensure that a certificate is valid.

    More elucidation would be great.  Anyone?
    I’d like more info too. I still sometimes use Safari, Reminders, email, and maybe the App Store(??) on my iPhone 4 (I have retro apps installed but don’t know if the App Store even works any more).

    It’s on iOS 6.x. I hated the buggy and ugly iOS 7. I didn’t go to that ugly new design until I bought my 6s. My iPhone 4 still looks beautiful and I’m reminded just how ugly and badly designed iOS is today every time I use my iPhone 4. Actually, it’s not possible to forget how bad the current GUI design is, but using my iPhone 4 rubs it in pretty well.
  • Reply 19 of 21
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,278member
    dysamoria said:
    razorpit said:
    ...Microsoft:   I'm typing this on a 10 year old machine running the latest version of Windows -- and I have even older machines running current versions as well.
    My wife is in the other room using a 2006 MBP as I type this. It’s not the most current version of Mac OS but still better than Windows 10.
    I still use a 2009 MacBook Pro. It’s maxed on memory, has an SSD, and is in perfect condition. It also runs High Sierra, despite Apple abandoning it prior to Sierra, thanks to dosdude1’s installer hacks.
    http://dosdude1.com/highsierra/
    Is it receiving security updates?  (even without the hack?)
  • Reply 20 of 21
    philboogiephilboogie Posts: 7,671member
    blah64 said:
    JFC_PA said:
    dysamoria said:
    I use my iPhone 4 as an iPod, without cellular enabled. Does this issue impact me?
     I: the gps functions for communication purposes such as app purchases etc. over the air. If your using your device as a passive player nothing will change. 
    What do you mean by "passive player"?

    I too have multiple iPhones that have no cellular, but they're well-used devices, which are used to purchase apps, take notes, play games, take photos and send email.  All via wifi.

    It's still unclear to me whether these devices, which run the gamut from 4s through 8 are impacted.  A couple points:

    I do not have, and never have had, GPS or location features enabled on any of the devices.  I fail to see the relationship between GPS functionality (which I know can help with very tiny time offsets) and something like a date/time check to ensure that a certificate is valid.

    More elucidation would be great.  Anyone?
    I'll try: AFAIK, the GPS chip is 'embedded' on the cellular chip. At least, that's what iPad specs state. A WiFi iPad can get location but merely from the Skyhook DB over WiFi (location doesn't work on a WiFi iPad with WiFi disabled). So I would think that your usage would be getting date/time over WiFi and still work because of that fact.

    I'd say, in your case, no impact.



    watto_cobra
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