Apple was founded 46 years ago, on April 1, 1976

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  • Reply 21 of 29
    XedXed Posts: 1,593member
    benji888 said:
    It was Apple Computer Inc. until iPod and music became popular, then, sometime before the iPhone it became Apple corporation and they changed the logo from rainbow to solid, they dropped Computer from the name when marketing focus moved off computers. ...the article refers to Apple corporation when it was Apple Computer Inc.
    Your timelines and memory seem a bit off.

    Jobs left Apple on 16 September 1985 and returned as interim CEO (iCEO) that same day in 1997. The rainbow logo remained until 1998 (so soon after Jobs returned to the helm) and probably inline with the release of the iMac 3G. The iPod won't ship until the last quarter of 2001, years after that logo was in place.

    There are also other logos. The first one sucked monkey balls.



    As for the name, it was originally Apple Computer Company where it was founded on this day in 1976, not Apple Computer Inc. Incorporation and the slight name change didn't happen until some time the next year.

    The switch from Apple Computer Inc. to Apple Inc. happened the same day as the historic iPhone announcement at
     Macworld Expo on January 9, 2007. Jobs did not say that they moved focus off computers—their Macs have never been better, but "because the company had shifted its emphasis from computers to consumer electronics."

    I'd argue that consumer electronics, especially the iPhone and iPad, are computers, but you, like countless others, see the word "computer" as only meaning a Mac or PC or server, and likely don't see "PC" as also referring to a Mac or another personal computing device. Apple clearly makes the most popular personal computing devices, but IBM creation of the IBM PC killed Apple's desire to associate with the PC nomenclature.
    ronn
  • Reply 22 of 29
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,896member
    AppleInsider said:
    To this day, Apple is known for how well it presents its products, how carefully designed the packaging is. Today, that is still part of what makes Apple, Apple.
    It totally makes an impression, too. My wife (who knows little to none of this history), remarked about the cleverness of the packaging when she got a new MBP recently.
    Of course, Apple sometimes fails to apply the principal. No clever packaging can undo the damage the horrible keyboard has done on my son's MBP.

    lkrupp said:
    I hitched a ride on Apple’s bandwagon in 1982 with an Apple ][+ and have never looked back. There’s something about the company even today that I find fascinating. Now that Apple is a trillion dollar company it has its problems and foibles but at the core it’s still the company it was in the early days. In my now 38 years on the bandwagon I have been treated well by Apple in both purchases and repairs. They fixed my late 2013 27”  iMac when the spring assembly holding the head up broke, long out of warranty, at no charge, with apologies. They fixed my water cooled G5, also at no charge. And they replaced my Power Mac 8100 immediately when the power supply failed, no questions asked. 
    You've got me beat by a couple of years. I knew of Apple before then, but didn't get into them until maybe '86 when we had one in a drafting class in school. Then a friend's brother who was a comp sci professor at Ohio State, and got him some pretty neat Macs (A Mac II if I remember correctly... numbered with jumpers on the motherboard). I was kind of hooked after that, but didn't actually afford to get my own first one until a LC (though we became roommates so I had access to his and at his any my workplace, as we both worked for resellers).

    I wonder if they are still replacing things like that these days? It helps to have an Apple Store just down the block, though, I suppose. When I worked in San Francisco, I was about a block away. I had an issue with a laptop and walked out with a new one (with better specs, even). Of course, maybe it helped that I somewhat frequently dropped in with work-machines from my well-known employer. But, I'd like to think they'd have done it for anyone who didn't seem to be trying to pull one over on them.
  • Reply 23 of 29
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,523member
    I resigned as head of the science department at the institution where I worked and started an Apple Dealership in the winter of 1977.
    FileMakerFeller
  • Reply 24 of 29
    danoxdanox Posts: 1,527member
    Rayz2016 said:
    lkrupp said:
    I hitched a ride on Apple’s bandwagon in 1982 with an Apple ][+ and have never looked back. There’s something about the company even today that I find fascinating. Now that Apple is a trillion dollar company it has its problems and foibles but at the core it’s still the company it was in the early days. In my now 38 years on the bandwagon I have been treated well by Apple in both purchases and repairs. They fixed my late 2013 27”  iMac when the spring assembly holding the head up broke, long out of warranty, at no charge, with apologies. They fixed my water cooled G5, also at no charge. And they replaced my Power Mac 8100 immediately when the power supply failed, no questions asked. 
    You're clearly one of a kind.

    If you ask people around here, walking into an Apple Store is just asking to have your dog shot.

    Must be little kids too young to remember the days of no store except the little sometimes good hole in the wall stores.
    edited April 2022 ronn
  • Reply 25 of 29
    sirdirsirdir Posts: 146member
    I somehow doubt it’s what would become the Apple II they tried to sell to HP or Atari. Furthermore, wouldn’t HP had the rights for the Apple I anyway because Woz was employed there at the time? and they just passed on it?
  • Reply 26 of 29
    XedXed Posts: 1,593member
    Rayz2016 said:
    lkrupp said:
    I hitched a ride on Apple’s bandwagon in 1982 with an Apple ][+ and have never looked back. There’s something about the company even today that I find fascinating. Now that Apple is a trillion dollar company it has its problems and foibles but at the core it’s still the company it was in the early days. In my now 38 years on the bandwagon I have been treated well by Apple in both purchases and repairs. They fixed my late 2013 27”  iMac when the spring assembly holding the head up broke, long out of warranty, at no charge, with apologies. They fixed my water cooled G5, also at no charge. And they replaced my Power Mac 8100 immediately when the power supply failed, no questions asked. 
    You're clearly one of a kind.

    If you ask people around here, walking into an Apple Store is just asking to have your dog shot.
    All his examples are from many years ago. I won't speculate on this post as to why, but how Apple Stores see customers has changed. It's too disjointed for my liking and I haven't been in there for several years now—even with an appointment—without feeling like I was standing around wondering if I was ever going to be seen.

    The exception was during the pandemic when stores had you queue up outside and they'd come down the line asking you why you were there. That was usually a line to buy something without an appointment in which case they'd go get it or lead you to it when a customer had left, or you were lead to the Genius Bar for your appointment when your tech was ready. They usually had coffee outside, too.

    For the Macs lkrupp is talking about I have plenty of stores about customer service that made going to an Apple store with an issue an enjoyable experience, but now even shopping in-store I desperately try to avoid.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 27 of 29
    sirdir said:
    I somehow doubt it’s what would become the Apple II they tried to sell to HP or Atari. Furthermore, wouldn’t HP had the rights for the Apple I anyway because Woz was employed there at the time? and they just passed on it?
    Back in the day there was no clause in employment contracts stating that the company owned whatever you came up with on your own time. HP even had "10% time" where Friday afternoons were dedicated to whatever employees wanted to work on (Google later copied this for their "20% time" but was already working folks so hard that most of them just kept doing company tasks). HP was founder-run; when the two founders retired the company went into a death spiral - much like Apple, although the "second coming" of Steve boosted the company onto a new trajectory.
    ronn
  • Reply 28 of 29
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,896member
    Xed said:
    All his examples are from many years ago. I won't speculate on this post as to why, but how Apple Stores see customers has changed. It's too disjointed for my liking and I haven't been in there for several years now—even with an appointment—without feeling like I was standing around wondering if I was ever going to be seen.
    Granted, I haven't been to an Apple store for a few years now, and sporadic for the past decade (been to a Vancouver BC, Milwaukee, etc.), but night and day difference from when they first started. I was at the San Francisco one (OK, it was a flagship store, to be fair) a lot, and sometimes at the Palo Alto one. It was far more customer-centric in the early days. They had (what looked to be) really good training classes. They were quite knowledgable and helpful across the board (not just Genius Bar). And, as noted, they were really focused on making the customer happy if thing hadn't gone so well.

    Now, they seem to just be a 'higher end' retail experience. The Genius Bar people might still be good, but I actually try to avoid advice from the floor people. Unfortunately, my wife has trusted their advice over mine a couple of times and ended up with slightly the wrong thing. That said, I hope we get one here in Victoria BC one of these days. It would be convenient if nothing else.

    FileMakerFeller said:
    Back in the day there was no clause in employment contracts stating that the company owned whatever you came up with on your own time. HP even had "10% time" where Friday afternoons were dedicated to whatever employees wanted to work on (Google later copied this for their "20% time" but was already working folks so hard that most of them just kept doing company tasks). HP was founder-run; when the two founders retired the company went into a death spiral - much like Apple, although the "second coming" of Steve boosted the company onto a new trajectory.
    There were, it just wasn't as standardized. It also went the other way (employer or employee benefit). We just have a lot more laws in place now and companies do more standardization.

    I was 'forced' to sign a non-compete at one point early on in my career that wouldn't hold up in most places these days. But, in many places, there are now a lot of laws protecting reasonable rights for employees, if not overly so (such that they get abused and cost employers a good bit).
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