ARM-based MacBook, Apple game controller coming soon says leaker

Posted:
in Future Apple Hardware edited May 2020
A series of tweets from an anonymous Twitter account has allegedly leaked details about future products that are still being worked on by Apple, including claims of an ARM-based 12-inch MacBook and an Apple game controller.




The recent collection of Twitter-based rumors and leaks surrounding Apple's products that were found to be highly accurate has prompted further examination of other Twitter leaker accounts, in the search for new information. One account, @L0vetodream, has been found to include a number of leaks that surfaced long before they were discussed by other parties, one which also offers supposed insight into other unreleased products.

The account is relatively new to Twitter, having joined in February 2020, and operates quite anonymously with its biography claiming it is operated by an "iPhone repairer." Despite its young age, the account has made many bold claims in a short timespan that have only recently become prominent.

In tweets dating back to early March, the account made claims Apple is working on its own game controller, while a mention of "AirPods X" headphones were made on March 12, seemingly corroborating a rumor tweeted by Jon Prosser, another prominent leaker, about the rumored over-ear headphones.

Another tweet on March 10 goes into detail about a new iPad Air model that includes a mini LED display. Despite having a full-screen design, the tweeter says it won't have a notch nor Face ID, but instead will rely on Touch ID that functions under the display.

the new iPad Air will be using the mini led screen, comes with full screen with no notch, not Face IDbut Touch ID under the screen



A longer March 12 tweet spotted by MacRumors lists off many other products rumored to be in development, including a 12-inch ARM-based MacBook, "AirPods X," "AirPods 3 Lite," the "HomePod Lite," "AirTag," and four "iPhone 12" models including Lite and Pro versions with 5G support and a new "Navy blue" color.

The tweet simultaneously mentions the iPad Pro having "TOF," referencing the LiDAR sensor on the rear ahead of the model's release, while its mentions of items like the "HomePod Lite" predate other rumors and speculation. The account also mentions delays in a new iMac's launch, as well as holdups surrounding TSMC's production of the A14 chip expected in the fall iPhone releases.

The A14, expected to be used in the fall iPhone releases, are currently tipped to be the first to cross the 3.0GHz barrier, making them the fastest version of the chip line ever created. While this will chiefly improve the performance of the iPhone with regard to complex tasks like AR rendering, it also gives it the potential to be used in an ARM-based Mac.

Production of the A14 was supposed to start in the second quarter, but conflicting analyst notes and supply chain reports in late March suggested a delay in manufacturing by TSMC could impact production schedules for related Apple products.

While there are some mistakes made by the account, such as the release date of iOS 13.4 off by one day, the accuracy of confirmed products suggests the account's rumors may be genuine. Even so, there is no guarantee that all items mentioned by a Twitter leaker could be taken as completely true, as other factors could affect Apple's production intentions, as demonstrated by the ongoing coronavirus pandemic impacts.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 33
    JinTechJinTech Posts: 764member
    Sounds like a busy lineup.
    Fatmanrepressthistmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 33
    knowitallknowitall Posts: 1,648member
    MacBook ARM sounds logical.
    jdiamondwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 33
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,287member
    knowitall said:
    MacBook ARM sounds logical.
    Maybe, but I’n guessing it will run some modified version of iOS and may only run iOS apps. Unless, of course, Apple comes up with a fast and reliable framework (like Rosetta) to emulate X86 code. Will developers have to create universal binaries again like they did for the PowerPC/Intel move.?
    jdiamondwatto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 33
    hodarhodar Posts: 336member
    I would like to see the Mac become more "reasonably" priced.  When the Mac Mini came out, it was priced aggressively to serve as a user upgradeable, entry level desktop to get people introduced into the Mac ecosystem.  My 2012 i5 was bought at the price of ~$700, I later upgraded the RAM, replaced the Logitech mouse/keyboard with Apple products, both the mouse and trackpad, and the extended keyboard.  I later upgraded and added two SSDs.  It's been a solid performer.

    To replace this $700 component today, with the same base components costs $1,000+ with 500GB storage I cannot upgrade.  I went from a 500GB HDD to a 1 and a 2 TB SDD in my old Mac Mini - I can't do that anymore.  Why did they do this?

    Would love to get the 2TB SDD i7 version of the Mac Mini, but at $2,000 before you add a nice monitor, and the Apple keyboard, mouse and trackpad.  Just seems like humble Mac Mini is stuck with a tremendous Mac Tax.
    boboliciouswilliamlondonOfer
  • Reply 5 of 33
    FatmanFatman Posts: 513member
    Hmm ... a controller... to be launched with the 'next gen' Apple TV sporting an A14, 512GB RAM, 8 core integrated GPU graphics and backed with a few A titles from the major game publishers :-) ... Not too far fetched.
    BeatsMisterKitunsui_grepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 33
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,287member
    hodar said:
    I would like to see the Mac become more "reasonably" priced.  When the Mac Mini came out, it was priced aggressively to serve as a user upgradeable, entry level desktop to get people introduced into the Mac ecosystem.  My 2012 i5 was bought at the price of ~$700, I later upgraded the RAM, replaced the Logitech mouse/keyboard with Apple products, both the mouse and trackpad, and the extended keyboard.  I later upgraded and added two SSDs.  It's been a solid performer.

    To replace this $700 component today, with the same base components costs $1,000+ with 500GB storage I cannot upgrade.  I went from a 500GB HDD to a 1 and a 2 TB SDD in my old Mac Mini - I can't do that anymore.  Why did they do this?

    Would love to get the 2TB SDD i7 version of the Mac Mini, but at $2,000 before you add a nice monitor, and the Apple keyboard, mouse and trackpad.  Just seems like humble Mac Mini is stuck with a tremendous Mac Tax.
    Nope! You need to leave the platform for that.
    edited April 2020 repressthisRayz2016
  • Reply 7 of 33
    lkrupp said:
    knowitall said:
    MacBook ARM sounds logical.
    Maybe, but I’n guessing it will run some modified version of iOS and may only run iOS apps. Unless, of course, Apple comes up with a fast and reliable framework (like Rosetta) to emulate X86 code. Will developers have to create universal binaries again like they did for the PowerPC/Intel move.?
    X86 on ARM is basically a solved problem.  The SQ1 chip from MS/Qualcomm running in the Surface Pro X is X86 on ARM.  It's decidedly 2nd gen and will need further refinement, but it's done and much, much better than the 1st gen stuff MS and Qualcomm cooked up in 2017/18.  I'm pretty sure (at least I'm hoping) there'd be no need to rely on iOS to get ARM on Macs.  Macs could still preferably run MacOS.  If Microsoft's dirth of apps is any indication, Apple would really need to motivate devs to push out apps. 
    Apple's experience with ARM can only be a benefit on that front.

    Controller: If they do make one, they should do what Sony just did with their new Dual Sense controller for the upcoming PS5... make it ergonomically similar to the XBox One  controller.  As long as they keep console controller compatibility, everything will be fine.  To be able to go from iPad, to Mac, to PC, to both consoles with one controller is both efficient and sweeeeeeeet. 
     
    Oferwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 33
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    hodar said:
    I would like to see the Mac become more "reasonably" priced.  When the Mac Mini came out, it was priced aggressively to serve as a user upgradeable, entry level desktop to get people introduced into the Mac ecosystem.  My 2012 i5 was bought at the price of ~$700, I later upgraded the RAM, replaced the Logitech mouse/keyboard with Apple products, both the mouse and trackpad, and the extended keyboard.  I later upgraded and added two SSDs.  It's been a solid performer.

    To replace this $700 component today, with the same base components costs $1,000+ with 500GB storage I cannot upgrade.  I went from a 500GB HDD to a 1 and a 2 TB SDD in my old Mac Mini - I can't do that anymore.  Why did they do this?

    Would love to get the 2TB SDD i7 version of the Mac Mini, but at $2,000 before you add a nice monitor, and the Apple keyboard, mouse and trackpad.  Just seems like humble Mac Mini is stuck with a tremendous Mac Tax.
    I’m a Mac mini guy myself, have been since 2010, and recently upgraded from my 2012. While I agree, it sucks losing the ability to upgrade individual components, the mini product line has changed its role. It is no longer an entry level machine. While not quite a Pro model, it is a far more powerful product than originally designed.

    Personally I think they are pushing the originally intended market group towards either an iPad or MacBook Air. Mini’s are now viewed as that hobbyist/server machine over the original “Welcome to the Mac” role they once had, if that makes sense. I wish there was another product line to fill that void, but there isn’t. Does there need to be? You and I think so, but apparently Apple doesn’t. Considering they see the numbers and usage, I guess we’ll have to trust them.

    Our little Mini is all grown up. It is now filling the space all those people that want a Pro so they can add storage, graphic cards, etc. but can’t afford/justify the expense of the Pro. I’m in that group.
    StrangeDaysrundhvidwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 33
    frantisekfrantisek Posts: 733member
    Can Apple launch ARM Mac just like fresh new product to in on order week later or it has to be introduced in advance on WWDC so developers can prepare for that?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 33
    lkrupp said:
    hodar said:
    I would like to see the Mac become more "reasonably" priced.  When the Mac Mini came out, it was priced aggressively to serve as a user upgradeable, entry level desktop to get people introduced into the Mac ecosystem.  My 2012 i5 was bought at the price of ~$700, I later upgraded the RAM, replaced the Logitech mouse/keyboard with Apple products, both the mouse and trackpad, and the extended keyboard.  I later upgraded and added two SSDs.  It's been a solid performer.

    To replace this $700 component today, with the same base components costs $1,000+ with 500GB storage I cannot upgrade.  I went from a 500GB HDD to a 1 and a 2 TB SDD in my old Mac Mini - I can't do that anymore.  Why did they do this?

    Would love to get the 2TB SDD i7 version of the Mac Mini, but at $2,000 before you add a nice monitor, and the Apple keyboard, mouse and trackpad.  Just seems like humble Mac Mini is stuck with a tremendous Mac Tax.
    Nope! You need to leave the platform for that.
    Indeed it seems that way now, by design...?

    To me the last mini that seemed a significant balanced upgrade was the 2011 model:
    - 2.7ghz i7 dual core (4 hyperlinked)
    - discrete GPU
    - upgradable retail twin drive slots (dual, Fusion, RAID, Time Machine setups, etc)
    - upgradable retail ram (to 16gb)
    - under $1k
    https://everymac.com/systems/apple/mac_mini/specs/mac-mini-core-i7-2.7-mid-2011-specs.html

    The server model traded the GPU for a quad core (8 hyperlinked) CPU and twin 7200 rpm drives, also under $1k...

    The former allowed a reasonably capable, versatile and elegant budget workstation that was entirely self contained and truly 'mini' with full mac ecosystem features as few as 2 wired connections to power and Thunderbolt display(s).

    Is the new Apple consciously externalizing features and closing their ecosystem down? Will ARM continue this trend ? Is this improving sales, or perhaps as importantly customer value ?

    RIP SJ

    edited April 2020 entropys
  • Reply 11 of 33
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,823member
    lkrupp said:
    knowitall said:
    MacBook ARM sounds logical.
    Maybe, but I’n guessing it will run some modified version of iOS and may only run iOS apps. Unless, of course, Apple comes up with a fast and reliable framework (like Rosetta) to emulate X86 code. Will developers have to create universal binaries again like they did for the PowerPC/Intel move.?

    A modified version of iOS that runs only iOS apps on a laptop?

    That's basically an iPad with a keyboard. We already have that.
    CloudTalkinStrangeDaysmacplusplusOferfastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 33
    thttht Posts: 3,980member
    frantisek said:
    Can Apple launch ARM Mac just like fresh new product to in on order week later or it has to be introduced in advance on WWDC so developers can prepare for that?
    Doubtful that they will announce and ship within a couple of weeks. For this to happen, there would be leaks from the supply chain and software developers for a long time now, but there really hasn't been much of any.

    As such, my bet is Apple would announce macOS/ARM, and won't ship for the next 4 to 6 months. They may or may not announce the hardware at the same time, but once macOS/ARM is out, obviously, hardware will follow.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 33
    BeatsBeats Posts: 2,426member
    Please let the game controller be innovative and released with the next Apple TV. Drop these bombshells at WWDC 2020!

    Fatman said:
    Hmm ... a controller... to be launched with the 'next gen' Apple TV sporting an A14, 512GB RAM, 8 core integrated GPU graphics and backed with a few A titles from the major game publishers :-) ... Not too far fetched.

    We've been dreaming too long. Good games and Apple Arcade is not it(not at the moment).
    edited April 2020 unsui_grep
  • Reply 14 of 33
    Fred257Fred257 Posts: 77member
    I’m a serious electronic musician.  I’ve used computers in my music since 1989.  I have currently moved all of my live electronic patches to my iPhone SE during this quarantine.  Goodbye MacBook Pro and expensive outboard gear.  I also control all my music gear inside my iPhone with my iPhone.  I welcome ARM with open ARMs but I don’t need a MacBook Pro any longer...
    MisterKitmacpluspluswatto_cobraSpamSandwich
  • Reply 15 of 33
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,388member
    lkrupp said:
    knowitall said:
    MacBook ARM sounds logical.
    Maybe, but I’n guessing it will run some modified version of iOS and may only run iOS apps. Unless, of course, Apple comes up with a fast and reliable framework (like Rosetta) to emulate X86 code. Will developers have to create universal binaries again like they did for the PowerPC/Intel move.?
    Highly unlikely. That would offer little advantage from an iPad.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 33
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,388member

    razorpit said:
    hodar said:
    I would like to see the Mac become more "reasonably" priced.  When the Mac Mini came out, it was priced aggressively to serve as a user upgradeable, entry level desktop to get people introduced into the Mac ecosystem.  My 2012 i5 was bought at the price of ~$700, I later upgraded the RAM, replaced the Logitech mouse/keyboard with Apple products, both the mouse and trackpad, and the extended keyboard.  I later upgraded and added two SSDs.  It's been a solid performer.

    To replace this $700 component today, with the same base components costs $1,000+ with 500GB storage I cannot upgrade.  I went from a 500GB HDD to a 1 and a 2 TB SDD in my old Mac Mini - I can't do that anymore.  Why did they do this?

    Would love to get the 2TB SDD i7 version of the Mac Mini, but at $2,000 before you add a nice monitor, and the Apple keyboard, mouse and trackpad.  Just seems like humble Mac Mini is stuck with a tremendous Mac Tax.
    I’m a Mac mini guy myself, have been since 2010, and recently upgraded from my 2012. While I agree, it sucks losing the ability to upgrade individual components, the mini product line has changed its role. It is no longer an entry level machine. While not quite a Pro model, it is a far more powerful product than originally designed.

    Personally I think they are pushing the originally intended market group towards either an iPad or MacBook Air. Mini’s are now viewed as that hobbyist/server machine over the original “Welcome to the Mac” role they once had, if that makes sense. I wish there was another product line to fill that void, but there isn’t. Does there need to be? You and I think so, but apparently Apple doesn’t. Considering they see the numbers and usage, I guess we’ll have to trust them.

    Our little Mini is all grown up. It is now filling the space all those people that want a Pro so they can add storage, graphic cards, etc. but can’t afford/justify the expense of the Pro. I’m in that group.
    Nailed it. iPads are the new non-computer-person computer, that role is served by the $329 and up iPad. I moved my parents over. I still have a mini, and I use it as a server — web, plex, Windows/SQL. It’s a nice computer, small, and silent. The price of a mini is cheap. Build it up as you like. 
    edited April 2020 razorpitwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 33
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,432member
    lkrupp said:
    knowitall said:
    MacBook ARM sounds logical.
    Maybe, but I’n guessing it will run some modified version of iOS and may only run iOS apps. 

    That doesn't make any sense. Why would it run a modified version of iOS and not macOS? It won't be called a "MacBook", if it doesn't run macOS.
    asdasdmwhitefastasleepwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 33
    asdasdasdasd Posts: 5,652member
    lkrupp said:
    knowitall said:
    MacBook ARM sounds logical.
    Maybe, but I’n guessing it will run some modified version of iOS and may only run iOS apps. Unless, of course, Apple comes up with a fast and reliable framework (like Rosetta) to emulate X86 code. Will developers have to create universal binaries again like they did for the PowerPC/Intel move.?
    FFS, stop spouting this nonsense. The OS and the ARM chip are two totally different things. For the vast majority of apps it is a recompile and for some not even that. 
    Xedrundhvidwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 33
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,823member
    asdasd said:
    lkrupp said:
    knowitall said:
    MacBook ARM sounds logical.
    Maybe, but I’n guessing it will run some modified version of iOS and may only run iOS apps. Unless, of course, Apple comes up with a fast and reliable framework (like Rosetta) to emulate X86 code. Will developers have to create universal binaries again like they did for the PowerPC/Intel move.?
    FFS, stop spouting this nonsense. The OS and the ARM chip are two totally different things. For the vast majority of apps it is a recompile and for some not even that. 
    Yep, Apple has been moving towards a relatively painless transition for ten years. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 33
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,266member
    Not sure why anyone would think that an ARM MacBook analog would support x86 initially, if ever, but it certainly will support recompiled MacOS applications, and that would satisfy a lot of Mac users. The MacBook Air will be available at a higher price point for those that need x86.
    watto_cobra
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