How to get 10% more when you add funds to your Apple ID

Posted:
in General Discussion edited October 2020
If you're the type of person who regularly purchases music, apps, and other Apple ecosystem purchases, we'll show you how to get the most bang for your buck. Here's how you can earn an extra 10% when adding funds to your Apple ID through July 31.

How to get 10% when you add funds to your Apple ID


An occasional promotion has been relaunched by Apple, providing those who added credit to their Apple ID.

Purchases will add an extra 10% on top whenever someone adds funds to their Apple ID, worth up to $200 in the United States, 200 GBP in the United Kingdom, and up to 300 euro in some European territories.

The bonus will only be applied to one purchase, according to the terms of the offer. That means that each user will only be able to get the 10% bonus the first time they add funds during the promotional period. This most recent offer stands until July 31, 2020, with users' eligibility varying based on their account information and purchase history.

How to add funds to your Apple ID

  1. On your iPhone, open Settings
  2. Tap iTunes & App Store
  3. Tap Apple ID
  4. Tap View Apple ID
  5. Tap Add funds to Apple ID
  6. Add your funds, and then confirm your purchase.
As previously stated, you can only get this promotion once during this promotional period, so be sure to add as much as you're comfortable with to maximize your bonus credit.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 17
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.
  • Reply 2 of 17
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,259administrator
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.
    I agree, but doing this strategically, coupled with our weekly movie and TV sale roundups on Friday seems like a logical combination.
  • Reply 3 of 17
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.
    I agree, but doing this strategically, coupled with our weekly movie and TV sale roundups on Friday seems like a logical combination.
    I do like saving money. Who doesn’t?
  • Reply 4 of 17
    mgrad92mgrad92 Posts: 11member
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.

    I mean, I guess it depends on how long it's going to be "sitting around"? If you regularly spend $10–$25 (or more) on Apple services, this is free money.

    edited June 2020 StrangeDays
  • Reply 5 of 17
    tommikeletommikele Posts: 511member
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.
    So a flat 10% bonus on your investment seems like a waste to you? On annualized basis that essentially risk free return on your money is huge and can't be matched anywhere else without making junk level investments that are highly unlikely to ever pay off.

    If you put $100 on your Apple ID plus the $10 bonus and used it in three months the APR is 40%. If you take a year to spend it the return is still 10%. That seems like a waste to you?

    In the politest way possible I can say it to you, you don't have any idea what you are talking about or are as uneducated about simple personal and consumer finance as someone can be.
    edited June 2020 cmd-zStrangeDayssvanstromGeorgeBMacleehamm
  • Reply 6 of 17
    tommikeletommikele Posts: 511member

    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.
    I agree, but doing this strategically, coupled with our weekly movie and TV sale roundups on Friday seems like a logical combination.
    I do like saving money. Who doesn’t?
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.
    I agree, but doing this strategically, coupled with our weekly movie and TV sale roundups on Friday seems like a logical combination.
    I do like saving money. Who doesn’t?
    Based on your comments, I don't think you actually like saving money and earning high quality returns on your investments. You compare this Apple ID $ program that pays a 10% bonus to debit cards and store cards that have a 0% return. What you've said makes no sense at all.
    cmd-zStrangeDays
  • Reply 7 of 17
    stewartsstewarts Posts: 12member
    tommikele said:
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.
    So a flat 10% bonus on your investment seems like a waste to you? On annualized basis that essentially risk free return on your money is huge and can't be matched anywhere else without making junk level investments that are highly unlikely to ever pay off.

    If you put $100 on your Apple ID plus the $10 bonus and used it in three months the APR is 40%. If you take a year to spend it the return is still 10%. That seems like a waste to you?

    In the politest way possible I can say it to you, you don't have any idea what you are talking about or are as uneducated about simple personal and consumer finance as someone can be.
    Your last paragraph was unnecessary. I’d appreciate it if we can keep comments to be about issues and avoid personal attacks.
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 8 of 17
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    stewarts said:
    tommikele said:
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.
    So a flat 10% bonus on your investment seems like a waste to you? On annualized basis that essentially risk free return on your money is huge and can't be matched anywhere else without making junk level investments that are highly unlikely to ever pay off.

    If you put $100 on your Apple ID plus the $10 bonus and used it in three months the APR is 40%. If you take a year to spend it the return is still 10%. That seems like a waste to you?

    In the politest way possible I can say it to you, you don't have any idea what you are talking about or are as uneducated about simple personal and consumer finance as someone can be.
    Your last paragraph was unnecessary. I’d appreciate it if we can keep comments to be about issues and avoid personal attacks.
    I would’ve never seen his comment anyway. I blocked that harassing troll long ago.
  • Reply 9 of 17
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 839member
    stewarts said:
    tommikele said:
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a no savings account these days loses money through inflation.
    So a flat 10% bonus on your investment seems like a waste to you? On annualized basis that essentially risk free return on your money is huge and can't be matched anywhere else without making junk level investments that are highly unlikely to ever pay off.

    If you put $100 on your Apple ID plus the $10 bonus and used it in three months the APR is 40%. If you take a year to spend it the return is still 10%. That seems like a waste to you?

    In the politest way possible I can say it to you, you don't have any idea what you are talking about or are as uneducated about simple personal and consumer finance as someone can be.
    Your last paragraph was unnecessary. I’d appreciate it if we can keep comments to be about issues and avoid personal attacks.
    Obviously you are new around here, haha. 
    edited June 2020 SpamSandwichmatrix077
  • Reply 10 of 17
    mike1mike1 Posts: 2,743member
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.

    What exactly am I losing by loading up $25 on my Starbuck's card once a month? No more than if I paid cash. I'll gain more in rewards in that month than I ever would in a "higher reward investment".
    StrangeDayssvanstromGeorgeBMac
  • Reply 11 of 17
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,573member
    tommikele said:
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.
    So a flat 10% bonus on your investment seems like a waste to you? On annualized basis that essentially risk free return on your money is huge and can't be matched anywhere else without making junk level investments that are highly unlikely to ever pay off.

    If you put $100 on your Apple ID plus the $10 bonus and used it in three months the APR is 40%. If you take a year to spend it the return is still 10%. That seems like a waste to you?

    In the politest way possible I can say it to you, you don't have any idea what you are talking about or are as uneducated about simple personal and consumer finance as someone can be.
    Agreed. He’s just virtue signaling, touting fiscal responsibility, etc. 
  • Reply 12 of 17
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,573member
    stewarts said:
    tommikele said:
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.
    So a flat 10% bonus on your investment seems like a waste to you? On annualized basis that essentially risk free return on your money is huge and can't be matched anywhere else without making junk level investments that are highly unlikely to ever pay off.

    If you put $100 on your Apple ID plus the $10 bonus and used it in three months the APR is 40%. If you take a year to spend it the return is still 10%. That seems like a waste to you?

    In the politest way possible I can say it to you, you don't have any idea what you are talking about or are as uneducated about simple personal and consumer finance as someone can be.
    Your last paragraph was unnecessary. I’d appreciate it if we can keep comments to be about issues and avoid personal attacks.
    Citing ignorance on a topic is not a personal attack. 
    svanstrom
  • Reply 13 of 17
    Jay7Jay7 Posts: 12member
    Incidentally, if you have an Apple Card (and it's your default payment method), you actually get a 13% bonus (10% from the Apple promotion and 3% daily cash back). I just added $200 to my Apple ID (using my Apple Card) and it says "Eligible for 3% Daily Cash". 
  • Reply 14 of 17
    bonobobbonobob Posts: 307member
    I prefer to get $100 Apple gift cards from Costco when they put hem on sale for $85.  Which, after 2% off on the Visa, comes to $83.30
  • Reply 15 of 17
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    mike1 said:
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.

    What exactly am I losing by loading up $25 on my Starbuck's card once a month? No more than if I paid cash. I'll gain more in rewards in that month than I ever would in a "higher reward investment".
    Did you know you can buy fractional shares of stocks? Save those $25 on the Starbucks cards, the debit cards, etc. and put them into AAPL instead... just a wild idea, since that’s what this site is all about.

    https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/whats-the-smallest-number-shares-i-can-buy/
    edited June 2020
  • Reply 16 of 17
    anantksundaramanantksundaram Posts: 20,225member
    Thanks, AI. Just got $113 for $100... ($10 for $100 + 3% cash back from AC).

    What a great return!
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 17 of 17
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,264member
    I dunno.., having money sitting around in accounts like (or on debit cards, or Starbucks cards or what have you) instead of in higher risk/higher reward investments seems a waste to me. Just having money in a savings account these days loses money through inflation.

    People who use debit cards most likely do not have the same options for investing money that you do.   in fact, they probably don't have the money to invest.
    A good example is my grandson:   Money that I give him goes either onto a Starbuck's Debit card or a Starbuck;s gift card.   He can then use it as needed (including online purchases) while I maintain control of how much he is given and spending (which, for him are one in the same!)

    And as you point out:  any money not invested (even money in Money Markets) is returning negative real interest rate -- meaning you end up with less spending money than you started with.   So, for this offer:   where else are you going to get a guaranteed 10% return?  You can't get that anywhere -- even in emerging market or high yield bonds.  The closest you can get to that is through market timing -- buying low and selling high -- which few can pull off successfully.
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