Intel-based iMac refresh will launch in the next week, leakers claim

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Comments

  • Reply 21 of 35
    laytechlaytech Posts: 281member
    It would make sense not to introduce a new design and wait for their own chip to unveil an all new design and chip as disappointing it will be to have to wait for a new design for another year or more. That said, these are just rumours so who really knows. One thing for sure, getting rid of intel is a smart move. 
    Scot1Rayz2016watto_cobra
  • Reply 22 of 35
    iqatedoiqatedo Posts: 1,762member
    vukasika said:
    No one wants this outdated look anymore.  Zero interest in paying Apple prices for a 2012 design.
    If they're there, they'll sell. I sell Macs at an AASP and plenty of people want the iMac. Our channel has been dry as all get out and I have had to beg borrow and barter to get them, because of WSFH and a lot of people's older 2009-2011 iMacs starting to age out. Older folks like the large screens on the 27", more traditional users like them, and they have larger storage drives. 
    sflocal said:
    vukasika said:
    No one wants this outdated look anymore.  Zero interest in paying Apple prices for a 2012 design.
     Check your ego.  You do not represent others.  

    I plan on buying one this year regardless of how it looks.  We can certainly argue a design being “outdated”, but at least the current iMac’s design is the most elegant compared to the competition.

    My 2009 27" i7 iMac is taking forever (not literally) to boot and log me in but is reliable with it's 8 GB RAM and 3 TB drive. I'm in the market this year and even though I'm not an Intel fan I'm not stressed about buying close to an Apple silicon release. Regarding design, not fussed there either, however, if Apple went to a slimmer design similar to my system, which is old enough for many not to be familiar with it, systems might catch the eye.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 23 of 35
    michelb76michelb76 Posts: 454member
    Hopefully it will contain a new and improved camera, and Face ID. Would be a good model to get the kinks out with before the ASI models roll out.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 24 of 35
    fallenjtfallenjt Posts: 4,050member
    I’m not buying any Mac until the one with Apple Silicon. For now, I focus on my Cybertruck 🤪
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 25 of 35
    dewmedewme Posts: 4,647member
    This will probably be a good machine to get you over the Intel->Apple Silicon transition period, especially if you need to support application development for other platforms like Windows and need first class virtualization support and can’t justify a Mac Pro. If you just need to get work done, the outdated (for Apple) aesthetics and thicker bezels don’t matter a whole lot. Based on the comments there are probably 2 - 3 folks here who will not buy the latest iMac iteration. I’m not sensing Apple shaking in its boots over those missed sales.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 26 of 35
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 6,020member
    iqatedo said:
    My 2009 27" i7 iMac is taking forever (not literally) to boot and log me in but is reliable with it's 8 GB RAM and 3 TB drive. I'm in the market this year and even though I'm not an Intel fan I'm not stressed about buying close to an Apple silicon release. Regarding design, not fussed there either, however, if Apple went to a slimmer design similar to my system, which is old enough for many not to be familiar with it, systems might catch the eye.
    My prior iMac was a 2009 and I loved it.  Why is it slow?  Mine was plenty fast after I upgraded it to an SSD and maxed the memory.  

    It would have continued being used if I did t botch a video ribbon cable and connector when I opened it up for some routine maintenance.  
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 27 of 35
    Eric_in_CTEric_in_CT Posts: 105member
    Backstory:
    I also have an iMac from 2009.  Just home use.  Int, E-mail, and Photos (66,000 and counting!). 
    I've put SSDs in two old iMacs (20" iMacs from 2008), and an A1283 Mac Mini.  All boot in 22 seconds now, and run great, but are stuck at El Cap. 
    I've been too scared to risk our primary home machine on El Cap for fear of breaking it, then we'll need a new/used 27" !.   
    We just soldier on.  Really need to open it up through and blow the dust out.  I suspect it's really bad in there.

    Side comment:
    In the US, the RAM pickup truck is "all-new", but RAM continues to make and sell the previous generation alongside the new generation.  Plenty of people in the market for a really good truck that does it's job well, without all the latest electronics.  So one saves good cash for a very good truck.

    Comment:
    If Apple sold what today is a $2500 iMac for $1500 with Intel's latest/final silicon, it would be a no-brainer to get the last Intel for a great price.
    But isn't part of the problem that Intel is too $$$?  So do we expect ASi to be better AND cheaper?  Or at least way-better, and similar $$$?
    So my only personal reservation is that the last Intel won't come with a big discount, and will remain full price.
    Sine a lot of us keep our iMacs for YEARs, it will appear old in a hurry after way-better comes out.

    E.
    edited July 2020 watto_cobra
  • Reply 28 of 35
    GG1GG1 Posts: 483member
    Backstory:
    I also have an iMac from 2009.  Just home use.  Int, E-mail, and Photos (66,000 and counting!). 
    I've put SSDs in two old iMacs (20" iMacs from 2008), and an A1283 Mac Mini.  All boot in 22 seconds now, and run great, but are stuck at El Cap. 
    I've been too scared to risk our primary home machine on El Cap for fear of breaking it, then we'll need a new/used 27" !.   
    We just soldier on.  Really need to open it up through and blow the dust out.  I suspect it's really bad in there.

    Side comment:
    In the US, the RAM pickup truck is "all-new", but RAM continues to make and sell the previous generation alongside the new generation.  Plenty of people in the market for a really good truck that does it's job well, without all the latest electronics.  So one saves good cash for a very good truck.

    Comment:
    If Apple sold what today is a $2500 iMac for $1500 with Intel's latest/final silicon, it would be a no-brainer to get the last Intel for a great price.
    But isn't part of the problem that Intel is too $$$?  So do we expect ASi to be better AND cheaper?  Or at least way-better, and similar $$$?
    So my only personal reservation is that the last Intel won't come with a big discount, and will remain full price.
    Sine a lot of us keep our iMacs for YEARs, it will appear old in a hurry after way-better comes out.

    E.
    Interesting idea for Apple to sell the older Intel model (at a discount) along side the forthcoming new ASi model (as well as for those needing every bit of x86 compatibility). Similarly what's done for iPhones now (at a discount).

    watto_cobra
  • Reply 29 of 35
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,980member
    I could still see them launching a new design for the last of the new iMacs then tweaking it again for the first ASi Mac.

    They did the same with the G5 iMac giving all-new design then first Intel iMac was same box with an iSight Camera as the only visual difference.  Do new design now with screen size bump for both models.

    As for Thermal envelops well if it is modular like discussed then they build 2 sizes for current thermal design being iMac and iMacPro.
    Then after the tweak drop the iMacPro 250W module (or retask it as an eGPU) and keep the 150W iMac module as the ASi iMacPro at the very end of the transition.

    I assume if they are going to replace the MacPro they need a ASi design in the Mac Family that can drive 100+ watts at the high end. Sell customers on the longevity of the new design by having (store) upgradable parts.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 30 of 35
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,896member
    entropys said:
    Let’s be honest, it doesn’t make sense to produce aN iMac redesign until the AS SOC is ready.  But the current model is long in the tooth. This release has to happen. if you don’t need a new iMac right now, why not wait? 
    It really needs the T2. If the ASi version is more than a few months away, it needed to be updated yesterday (or a year ago, etc.).
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 31 of 35
    DuhSesameDuhSesame Posts: 1,265member
    cgWerks said:
    entropys said:
    Let’s be honest, it doesn’t make sense to produce aN iMac redesign until the AS SOC is ready.  But the current model is long in the tooth. This release has to happen. if you don’t need a new iMac right now, why not wait? 
    It really needs the T2. If the ASi version is more than a few months away, it needed to be updated yesterday (or a year ago, etc.).
    Speaking of which...

    The iMac Pro on the other hand can cool the 18-Core without throttle (if you manually set the fan to the maximum) and even with 14 degrees of headroom.  The chassis is more than capable for one to drop a decent cooler in.

    Meanwhile, the heat sink on the consumer iMac hasn’t changed for eight years...
    cgWerks
  • Reply 32 of 35
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,896member
    DuhSesame said:
    Speaking of which...

    The iMac Pro on the other hand can cool the 18-Core without throttle (if you manually set the fan to the maximum) and even with 14 degrees of headroom.  The chassis is more than capable for one to drop a decent cooler in.

    Meanwhile, the heat sink on the consumer iMac hasn’t changed for eight years...
    Yeah, I don't understand why Apple doesn't give the non-pro Macs more cooling capacity. Is it that they stubbornly just think non-pro users can't possibly doing anything that needs the cooling, or that they don't want them competing with the pro-models?
  • Reply 33 of 35
    DuhSesameDuhSesame Posts: 1,265member
    cgWerks said:
    DuhSesame said:
    Speaking of which...

    The iMac Pro on the other hand can cool the 18-Core without throttle (if you manually set the fan to the maximum) and even with 14 degrees of headroom.  The chassis is more than capable for one to drop a decent cooler in.

    Meanwhile, the heat sink on the consumer iMac hasn’t changed for eight years...
    Yeah, I don't understand why Apple doesn't give the non-pro Macs more cooling capacity. Is it that they stubbornly just think non-pro users can't possibly doing anything that needs the cooling, or that they don't want them competing with the pro-models?
    well, I can think of two reasons:

    1). the 10910 is still faster than 95% of desktops even without decent cooling.
    2). redesigning the last Intel Mac isn't worth it.

    That said, they could still modify the thermal system back earlier.
  • Reply 34 of 35
    cgWerkscgWerks Posts: 2,896member
    DuhSesame said:
    cgWerks said:
    Yeah, I don't understand why Apple doesn't give the non-pro Macs more cooling capacity. Is it that they stubbornly just think non-pro users can't possibly doing anything that needs the cooling, or that they don't want them competing with the pro-models?
    well, I can think of two reasons:

    1). the 10910 is still faster than 95% of desktops even without decent cooling.
    2). redesigning the last Intel Mac isn't worth it.

    That said, they could still modify the thermal system back earlier.
    Yes, but a couple more points... :)
    - there is more to cooling than just speed, like longevity and noise.
    - adequate cooling has been problem with Apple outside some pro models, since modern computing.

    Also, as for the iMac, maybe the guts are too different, but couldn't have they just started using the iMac Pro chassis? Since they have the cooling problem fixed there, why not use that advance in the product line to just make them all better?
  • Reply 35 of 35
    DuhSesameDuhSesame Posts: 1,265member
    cgWerks said:
    DuhSesame said:
    cgWerks said:
    Yeah, I don't understand why Apple doesn't give the non-pro Macs more cooling capacity. Is it that they stubbornly just think non-pro users can't possibly doing anything that needs the cooling, or that they don't want them competing with the pro-models?
    well, I can think of two reasons:

    1). the 10910 is still faster than 95% of desktops even without decent cooling.
    2). redesigning the last Intel Mac isn't worth it.

    That said, they could still modify the thermal system back earlier.
    Yes, but a couple more points... :)
    - there is more to cooling than just speed, like longevity and noise.
    - adequate cooling has been problem with Apple outside some pro models, since modern computing.

    Also, as for the iMac, maybe the guts are too different, but couldn't have they just started using the iMac Pro chassis? Since they have the cooling problem fixed there, why not use that advance in the product line to just make them all better?
    They'll keep the noise down regardless the temperature.  I have an old 2009 MacBook that only spin up the fan at 90 degrees.  It got plenty of cooling to keep it down, but using it is another matter.

    I think people rarely push their processors at 100C even with most pros (which also have tons of purchasing power) and the iMac idles at 30C.  It still sucks for us, but that's how it is, redesign before a redesign wouldn't make sense and it's better to be compatible right now.

    Will have a new judgement of ASi iMacs though.
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