T-Mobile rechristens its 5G network as 'standalone,' expands to 7,500 cities

Posted:
in General Discussion
T-Mobile is launching what it is calling a "standalone" 5G network across the U.S. on Tuesday just in time for the "iPhone 12" launch this fall.

T-Mobile launches a standalone 5G network
T-Mobile launches a standalone 5G network


Previously, T-Mobile had been leveraging existing LTE architecture to access the 5G spectrum, but with "standalone" architecture, users will now have access to the 600MHz 5G band without the need of LTE networks. The newly-built standalone architecture expands T-Mobile's 5G network by 30%, according to T-Mobile.

However, the network expansion doesn't mean that the fastest portions of the network will be universally available. Using sub-6Ghz spectrum, the connections will be robust and wide-spread enough for normal usage, and provide some overall traffic routing benefits, but all markets won't get the physics-limited mmWave technology that is often the main focus of 5G hype.

After T-Mobile and Sprint merged, the network architecture has been combined to accelerate the expansion of 5G across the country.

"Since Sprint became part of T-Mobile, we've been rapidly combining networks for a supercharged Un-carrier while expanding our nationwide 5G footprint, and today we take a massive step into the future with standalone 5G architecture," said Neville Ray, President of Technology at T-Mobile. "This is where it gets interesting, opening the door for massive innovation in this country -- and while the other guys continue to play catch up, we'll keep growing the world's most advanced 5G network."

According to T-Mobile, The first phase of 5G rollout took place using existing LTE architecture, which let users access the core-5G network via mid-range LTE bands. Now that the standalone architecture for 5G is being rolled out, users will be able to experience the 5G network directly via network towers.

T-Mobile says one tower can cover hundreds of square miles with 600MHz 5G speeds. This is critical for use in rural areas such as North Dakota. The service now has 1.3 million square miles of coverage across 7,500 cities.

The launch of a commercial 5G network prior to the "iPhone 12" launch this fall is sure to boost interest in the new lineup. Four new iPhone models are expected with support for 5G.
ronn

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    tokyojimutokyojimu Posts: 487member
    I always appreciated that T-Mobile‘s prices included everything so there were no surprises. Now they’ve gone to the scammy “plus taxes and fees“ model that the other carriers use. That’s too bad. 

    Not including taxes is one thing, but these bogus “fees“ that they themselves add is too much.
    caladaniancornchipmontrosemacsblurpbleepblooprazorpittwokatmew
  • Reply 2 of 9
    I'm occasionally seeing Band 71-600 Mhz-in my neighborhood. They're definitely working to bring that online. I'm also seeing Band 66-1700 Mhz-more often as well. Looking forward to better coverage in the upcoming days since T-Mobile took a tower near my house out of service last hear and the coverage in the area has been spotty since that time.
  • Reply 3 of 9
    T-Mobile's 4G LTE coverage seems to have declined in the area that I live. It's completely urban and getting two bars outdoors is not uncommon now. 
  • Reply 4 of 9
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,270member
    Interesting claims by T-Mobile:

    15x faster.

    Our network will be 8x faster than current LTE in just a few years, and 15x faster in the next six years.

    ----------------------------------------------------

    99% with 5G.

    We already have the largest 5G network, and within the next 6 years we’ll provide 5G to 99% of Americans.

    ----------------------------------------

    5G access included in every plan—at no extra charge.



    It will be interesting to see what AT&T and Verizon come up with to counter those claims.
    But, if true, what's not to like?



    edited August 2020 peteoronniconaught
  • Reply 5 of 9
    peteopeteo Posts: 395member
    This is great for coverage, but the speeds on the 600mhz frequency will probably be lower than LTE in a lot of these places
  • Reply 6 of 9
    razorpitrazorpit Posts: 1,796member
    I'm occasionally seeing Band 71-600 Mhz-in my neighborhood. They're definitely working to bring that online. I'm also seeing Band 66-1700 Mhz-more often as well. Looking forward to better coverage in the upcoming days since T-Mobile took a tower near my house out of service last hear and the coverage in the area has been spotty since that time.
    What do you use to see that? I’d like to see what bands there are in my area. My coverage with AT&T is terrible and I’d like to switch. Would be helpful to see what other signals are around.
    Interesting claims by T-Mobile:

    15x faster.

    Our network will be 8x faster than current LTE in just a few years, and 15x faster in the next six years.

    ----------------------------------------------------

    99% with 5G.

    We already have the largest 5G network, and within the next 6 years we’ll provide 5G to 99% of Americans.

    ----------------------------------------

    5G access included in every plan—at no extra charge.



    It will be interesting to see what AT&T and Verizon come up with to counter those claims.
    But, if true, what's not to like?



    I see that as all marketing. Six years? Who’s going to remember any of that or challenge them on it? Besides, we’re all supposed to be either underwater or living on a desert planet in the next 5 years, 5G won’t be needed.  ;)
  • Reply 7 of 9
    Interesting claims by T-Mobile:

    15x faster.

    Our network will be 8x faster than current LTE in just a few years, and 15x faster in the next six years.

    ----------------------------------------------------

    99% with 5G.

    We already have the largest 5G network, and within the next 6 years we’ll provide 5G to 99% of Americans.

    ---------------------------------------

    5G access included in every plan—at no extra charge.

    It will be interesting to see what AT&T and Verizon come up with to counter those claims.
    But, if true, what's not to like?

    What most people are not aware of is that the 5G network much more than just a function on your phone.  As 5G is rolled out most people on devices with 2G, 3G, LTE and 5G antennas are all using the "5G network".  The advancements in the 5G network beyond antennas is so much more about the network than it is about phones and devices.

    5G is reorganizing the wireless network and this is what will be driving low latency communications.   Latency advancements that will be competitive with Fiber To The Home, DSL and Cable Internet.   I fully expect to see over the next few years that Network Providers will roll out fixed wireless broadly enough that it will be as reliable and possibly more reliable than many current cable and other gigabit-internet services and price competitive.

    Normally I would be cautiously optimistic when a service provider is quoting performance increases like this, however, the changes that are happening throughout Verizon, T-Mobile, ATT is nothing short of a complete overhaul in how network services are delivered.

    The only historical comparison that I draw as to how significant this is to the improvement of network access, is the transition from dial-up to wired broadband internet.
    ronn
  • Reply 8 of 9
    SpamSandwichSpamSandwich Posts: 33,408member
    The best thing about this transition to 5G is you can cook a hamburger if you slap it between 2 5G phones.
    iconaught
  • Reply 9 of 9
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,270member
    iconaught said:
    Interesting claims by T-Mobile:

    15x faster.

    Our network will be 8x faster than current LTE in just a few years, and 15x faster in the next six years.

    ----------------------------------------------------

    99% with 5G.

    We already have the largest 5G network, and within the next 6 years we’ll provide 5G to 99% of Americans.

    ---------------------------------------

    5G access included in every plan—at no extra charge.

    It will be interesting to see what AT&T and Verizon come up with to counter those claims.
    But, if true, what's not to like?

    What most people are not aware of is that the 5G network much more than just a function on your phone.  As 5G is rolled out most people on devices with 2G, 3G, LTE and 5G antennas are all using the "5G network".  The advancements in the 5G network beyond antennas is so much more about the network than it is about phones and devices.

    5G is reorganizing the wireless network and this is what will be driving low latency communications.   Latency advancements that will be competitive with Fiber To The Home, DSL and Cable Internet.   I fully expect to see over the next few years that Network Providers will roll out fixed wireless broadly enough that it will be as reliable and possibly more reliable than many current cable and other gigabit-internet services and price competitive.

    Normally I would be cautiously optimistic when a service provider is quoting performance increases like this, however, the changes that are happening throughout Verizon, T-Mobile, ATT is nothing short of a complete overhaul in how network services are delivered.

    The only historical comparison that I draw as to how significant this is to the improvement of network access, is the transition from dial-up to wired broadband internet.

    A similar transition happened in mainframe computing in the second half of the 20th century:   Originally mainframes served one location and one location only -- all peripherals were plugged directly in.   Then they developed some rudimentary communications via leased lines that opened things up a bit.   But when high speed, high capacity T1  lines (and later T3, etc...) came along, suddenly that mainframe became what we think of today as "The Cloud":   it held the software and data entire corporation ran off of it hundreds or thousands of miles away.

    Changes in communications technology revolutionized computing like nothing else before or since.

    In the scheme of things, 5G is just another step in the march forward -- but it will be a pretty big step.  Those who think its only about downloading YouTube videos faster are missing the point.
Sign In or Register to comment.