Carrier marketing email confirms 'iPhone 12' 5G support

Posted:
in General Discussion
Carriers are preparing for the launch of a 5G "iPhone 12," as shown by a leaked marketing email from a wireless carrier.




Well-known leaker Evan Blass shared a screenshot of a leaked carrier marketing email to Twitter on September 9. The email reads "Hello iPhone 12. Be the first to experience it on [redacted carrier name] 5G."



It's long been rumored that the "iPhone 12" will support 5G cellular networks. The email also tells users to "Stay Active with 'Apple Watch Series 6,'" another Apple product that has not been officially announced yet.

Apple is rumored to release four new smartphones in the "iPhone 12" lineup this fall, which will likely boast a number of improvements over the previous generation.

Apple confirmed it would be holding its usual special event on September 15, continuing its annual tradition for one more year. While it will be a "virtual" presentation instead of one with a live audience, the show will still include a number of new product launches.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 12
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,645member
    There was a story earlier about only certain models of the 12 supporting mm wave 5G - I wonder if they will limit it to the ‘max’ versions so they can minimize the effect of battery drain?

    Mostly, I’m interested to see exactly how much of a difference 5G makes in daily use compared to 4G. we’ve had all the stories of 5G nirvana in our faces for the last couple of years but I haven’t seen anything beyond a few speed tests in the rare spots where you can get good mm wave reception, which is really not representative of what 5G will be for 90% of us. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 12
    Need the infrastructure.
    Very few places have it so its not going to benefit many.
    cornchipelectorwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 12
    And not all the 5G services will be avail at launch in all places as of 5G concerns raised in many places ...
  • Reply 4 of 12
    mike1mike1 Posts: 2,981member
    MplsP said:
    There was a story earlier about only certain models of the 12 supporting mm wave 5G - I wonder if they will limit it to the ‘max’ versions so they can minimize the effect of battery drain?

    Mostly, I’m interested to see exactly how much of a difference 5G makes in daily use compared to 4G. we’ve had all the stories of 5G nirvana in our faces for the last couple of years but I haven’t seen anything beyond a few speed tests in the rare spots where you can get good mm wave reception, which is really not representative of what 5G will be for 90% of us. 

    I'd be very surprised if the two models that included mm wave were the two larger models.If the feature is only going to be in two of the four models, I would bet it is the two Pro models. Remember, the rumored size of the "12 Max" and the smaller "12 Pro" are the same.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 12
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,957member
    I still don’t see why we need this. 

    It doesn’t even work through walls. What’s the point if it doesn’t work through walls?
    Japheytmaywatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 12
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,214member
    Rayz2016 said:
    I still don’t see why we need this. 

    It doesn’t even work through walls. What’s the point if it doesn’t work through walls?
    When planning cellular networks, interior spaces are not even a consideration for city coverage. You are only getting the excess signal from the street.

    Obviously mmWave was never intended to go through anything and it was never designed for anything other than densely populated areas. 

    5G is a collection of different technologies and implementations. For example, implementations of the same technologies are different depending on climate in many areas. 

    If you want to get fast coverage into your house you have plenty of options that include CPE or of course fibre and WiFi from within the house itself. 
  • Reply 7 of 12
    eriamjheriamjh Posts: 1,368member
    Rayz2016 said:
    I still don’t see why we need this. 

    It doesn’t even work through walls. What’s the point if it doesn’t work through walls?
    Why would anyone need 640k? 
  • Reply 8 of 12
    Remember, 5G is a specification, not the bands themselves. 2G (EDGE/CDMA), 3G (UMTS/CDMA), 4G (LTE), and 5G [have] run on existing 800-, 900-, 1700-, 1900-, 2100MHz cellular bands, as well as the new hotness in 700- and 600Mhz. 

    Theoretically, chipsets could be designed to run 5G-spec'd RF signals from DC to daylight.  But even then, that's just the RF portion of the specifications.

    Also, just because the spec carves out use in the Part-15 bands (2.4-, 5-, 24-, 60GHz) and other licensed bands (28GHz, etc.) does not mean all manufacturers and chipsets will (immediately) provide support for all of them. (That's a lot of antennas and/or antenna tuning tech to cram into a handset.)  There's a lot of room in there for IoT devices, hotspots, fixed wireless applications, etc.
    cornchipMplsP
  • Reply 9 of 12
    If this is real, why would somebody bother to redact the name of the company that sent it out?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 12
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,645member
    avon b7 said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    I still don’t see why we need this. 

    It doesn’t even work through walls. What’s the point if it doesn’t work through walls?
    When planning cellular networks, interior spaces are not even a consideration for city coverage. You are only getting the excess signal from the street.

    Obviously mmWave was never intended to go through anything and it was never designed for anything other than densely populated areas. 

    5G is a collection of different technologies and implementations. For example, implementations of the same technologies are different depending on climate in many areas. 

    If you want to get fast coverage into your house you have plenty of options that include CPE or of course fibre and WiFi from within the house itself. 
    This. The mobile industry has been touting and indoctrinating the public with 5G for the last 3-4 years now but the message has primarily been ‘it’s the next big thing’ and ‘it’s really fast.’ As usual, nuance has been lost. For mobile users there will be very few applications, especially initially. I suspect much of the benefit will actually be backend stuff - things like better connectivity in crowded areas. The problem with that is you notice your phone not working, you don’t notice it when it works as expected. The cell phone companies can’t sell that, either. 

    Ultimately, I think the problem with 5G is it’s not going to be like 4G where there was a already a need and a desire for more speed. With 5G, the benefits for most users will be more modest, more subtle, and will come more slowly. I really don’t see 5G having a major impact for at least a couple more years.

    Edit: I would dispute the statement that interior spaces aren’t a consideration. True, most people have wifi in their house, but many people also want/need cellular reception inside buildings, so you can’t completely ignore it, and beyond not penetrating buildings, mm wave doesn’t even penetrate trees.
    edited September 2020 watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 12
    tmaytmay Posts: 5,720member
    MplsP said:
    avon b7 said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    I still don’t see why we need this. 

    It doesn’t even work through walls. What’s the point if it doesn’t work through walls?
    When planning cellular networks, interior spaces are not even a consideration for city coverage. You are only getting the excess signal from the street.

    Obviously mmWave was never intended to go through anything and it was never designed for anything other than densely populated areas. 

    5G is a collection of different technologies and implementations. For example, implementations of the same technologies are different depending on climate in many areas. 

    If you want to get fast coverage into your house you have plenty of options that include CPE or of course fibre and WiFi from within the house itself. 
    This. The mobile industry has been touting and indoctrinating the public with 5G for the last 3-4 years now but the message has primarily been ‘it’s the next big thing’ and ‘it’s really fast.’ As usual, nuance has been lost. For mobile users there will be very few applications, especially initially. I suspect much of the benefit will actually be backend stuff - things like better connectivity in crowded areas. The problem with that is you notice your phone not working, you don’t notice it when it works as expected. The cell phone companies can’t sell that, either. 

    Ultimately, I think the problem with 5G is it’s not going to be like 4G where there was a already a need and a desire for more speed. With 5G, the benefits for most users will be more modest, more subtle, and will come more slowly. I really don’t see 5G having a major impact for at least a couple more years.
    Here's a current 5G test of the three Cellular networks, in various U.S. zcities;

    https://www.pcmag.com/fastest-mobile-networks/2020

    While I'm going to be purchasing an iPhone 12 Pro Max, soon I hope, I doubt that I'll ever have a need for mmwave, and frankly, solid 4G speeds and coverage will be more than satisfactory, with or without a 5G indication on my iPhone.

    I'm waiting for the real network technology, 6G...

    https://www.lifewire.com/6g-wireless-4685524
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 12
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 3,645member
    tmay said:
    MplsP said:
    avon b7 said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    I still don’t see why we need this. 

    It doesn’t even work through walls. What’s the point if it doesn’t work through walls?
    When planning cellular networks, interior spaces are not even a consideration for city coverage. You are only getting the excess signal from the street.

    Obviously mmWave was never intended to go through anything and it was never designed for anything other than densely populated areas. 

    5G is a collection of different technologies and implementations. For example, implementations of the same technologies are different depending on climate in many areas. 

    If you want to get fast coverage into your house you have plenty of options that include CPE or of course fibre and WiFi from within the house itself. 
    This. The mobile industry has been touting and indoctrinating the public with 5G for the last 3-4 years now but the message has primarily been ‘it’s the next big thing’ and ‘it’s really fast.’ As usual, nuance has been lost. For mobile users there will be very few applications, especially initially. I suspect much of the benefit will actually be backend stuff - things like better connectivity in crowded areas. The problem with that is you notice your phone not working, you don’t notice it when it works as expected. The cell phone companies can’t sell that, either. 

    Ultimately, I think the problem with 5G is it’s not going to be like 4G where there was a already a need and a desire for more speed. With 5G, the benefits for most users will be more modest, more subtle, and will come more slowly. I really don’t see 5G having a major impact for at least a couple more years.
    Here's a current 5G test of the three Cellular networks, in various U.S. zcities;

    https://www.pcmag.com/fastest-mobile-networks/2020

    While I'm going to be purchasing an iPhone 12 Pro Max, soon I hope, I doubt that I'll ever have a need for mmwave, and frankly, solid 4G speeds and coverage will be more than satisfactory, with or without a 5G indication on my iPhone.

    I'm waiting for the real network technology, 6G...

    https://www.lifewire.com/6g-wireless-4685524
    That's a really interesting article - some key quotes:
    • "[does] 5G live up to the hype? The answer: Not quite yet."
    • "While Verizon regains the title of the fastest..network, [they] still have very little coverage"
    • "Our AT&T 5G results, especially, were slower than 4G results"
    • "our 5G results ere disappointing all around, on every carrier."
    They also have a nice discussion about the differences in how the telecoms are implementing 5G. Verizon seems to be focusing on mmWave and gives blazing speeds but only at 4% of the sites tested. AT&T have broader coverage but slower speeds. (And the Bell And Telus network in Canada delivered double the speeds of any of the US networks without any 5G.)

    I think the last two paragraphs summed it up nicely:
    "Despite many of our findings, I still believe that 5G is going to change how we live. But it isn't going to do so in the way US carriers are currently rolling it out... Instead, most of our current 5G coverage offers people a slightly improved 4G experience dressed up with a shiny new icon."

    There's more to the article than can be summed up in a post like this, so I think it's worthwhile for anyone interested to read the entire thing. My big take away is that this is a slow evolution and it will be a while before any potential is realized.


    watto_cobramuthuk_vanalingam
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