MagSafe chargers may imprint leather cases, are compatible with 12W adapters

Posted:
in General Discussion
Apple warned users that its new MagSafe charger may leave circular imprints on leather cases, and added that the accessory is also compatible with 12W power adapters.

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple


The MagSafe charger is a new accessory that magnetically attaches to the back of an iPhone 12 or iPhone 12 Pro to provide faster charging speeds. It's also compatible with a new range of cases and other accessories.

In a new support document published on Friday, Apple notes that users who keep their iPhone in a leather case when charging with a MagSafe charger may see circular imprints from the contact.

Other types of case materials may be affected, too. MacRumors reports that at least one user has noticed circular imprints on their silicone-based cases. Apple's specific warning about iPhone 12 leather cases, which don't officially launch until Nov. 6, could suggest that they may be more affected by the contact.

Along with the warning about leather cases, Apple also provided MagSafe details and best practices. For example, Apple makes the following recommendations:

  • Don't place credit cards, security badges, passports, or key fobs between an iPhone and a MagSafe charger. Doing so may damage the magnetic strips or RFID tags in them.

  • Keep an eye on the temperature. Apple says MagSafe chargers can cause an iPhone to get slightly warmer. If a device gets too warm, Apple says that users should move their iPhone and charger to a cooler location.

  • The iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro will prioritize wired charging if a Lightning cable is plugged in while attached to a MagSafe charger.

The company also notes that the MagSafe charger is actually compatible with power adapters of at least 12 watts, but adds that users won't see the best charging speeds unless they use a 20W charging brick or higher.
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 29
    sflocalsflocal Posts: 5,728member
    I can only assume that Apple is putting out this PSA to stem the pond-scum lawyers from filing class-action lawsuits claiming Apple caused "irreparable damages" to users that bought a leather case and expected it to look brand new forever.

    Sad.
    macxpresslolliverlkrupprobin huberforgot usernamerazorpitRayz2016applguyjony0
  • Reply 2 of 29
    macxpressmacxpress Posts: 5,172member
    sflocal said:
    I can only assume that Apple is putting out this PSA to stem the pond-scum lawyers from filing class-action lawsuits claiming Apple caused "irreparable damages" to users that bought a leather case and expected it to look brand new forever.

    Sad.
    Oh don't worry, it won't stop a shitstorm from happening though. Just wait and watch...
  • Reply 3 of 29
    rob53rob53 Posts: 2,638member
    sflocal said:
    I can only assume that Apple is putting out this PSA to stem the pond-scum lawyers from filing class-action lawsuits claiming Apple caused "irreparable damages" to users that bought a leather case and expected it to look brand new forever.

    Sad.
    My leather case for my iPhone 11 Pro Max, Otterbox Strada, is leather and it already has scratches on it, which makes it look like it's being used instead of simply sitting on the mantle. I was told leather acts as a barrier protecting RFID chips. Didn't realize that until I bought a leather wallet. I'm tired of people who think everything stays as perfect as it was when they bought it. The only way this happens is if you leave it in the box and put it in a safe. 

    I'd actually like it to be indented so it slips onto the charger. I tried a Qi charger and hated it so went back to the normal cable. Maybe the MagSafe will work better but nothing beats a cable for speed.
    Japheyforgot username
  • Reply 4 of 29
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 622member
    Leather doesn’t block radio waves (RFID) that takes conductive metal. Which some leather cases incorporate just for that privacy feature. 
    elijahggregoriusmPetrolDavebageljoeyStrangeDaysjony0
  • Reply 5 of 29
    sflocal said:
    I can only assume that Apple is putting out this PSA to stem the pond-scum lawyers from filing class-action lawsuits claiming Apple caused "irreparable damages" to users that bought a leather case and expected it to look brand new forever.

    Sad.
    What Apple is saying they already know their unreleased leather case could have an adverse reaction to their charging puck.  It's obvious they've worked to mitigate the issue but haven't found an acceptable answer to the problem.  Instead of putting out the case and letting the issue materialize and blow up (having you make excuses for it), they've decided to proactively and responsibly let customer know damage may happen (and you still manage to try to make feeble excuses for it).  Jeebus.

    What's sad is your apologist hyperbolic and totally unnecessary take on the situation.  You've taken Apple admitting there's a foreseeable problem and turned it into some fantasy expectation of brand new leather forever.  How does one go from zero to full Spinal Tap 11 so quickly and without cause?  Apple did a good thing.  The right thing. They really don't need people making exaggerated lame excuses.  They handled it properly.  
    avon b7williamlondonctt_zhmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 6 of 29
    elijahgelijahg Posts: 2,311member
    sflocal said:
    I can only assume that Apple is putting out this PSA to stem the pond-scum lawyers from filing class-action lawsuits claiming Apple caused "irreparable damages" to users that bought a leather case and expected it to look brand new forever.

    Sad.
    What Apple is saying they already know their unreleased leather case could have an adverse reaction to their charging puck.  It's obvious they've worked to mitigate the issue but haven't found an acceptable answer to the problem.  Instead of putting out the case and letting the issue materialize and blow up (having you make excuses for it), they've decided to proactively and responsibly let customer know damage may happen (and you still manage to try to make feeble excuses for it).  Jeebus.

    What's sad is your apologist hyperbolic and totally unnecessary take on the situation.  You've taken Apple admitting there's a foreseeable problem and turned it into some fantasy expectation of brand new leather forever.  How does one go from zero to full Spinal Tap 11 so quickly and without cause?  Apple did a good thing.  The right thing. They really don't need people making exaggerated lame excuses.  They handled it properly.  
    You have got entirely the wrong end of the stick. sflocal literally says people might "expect it to look brand new forever", and Apple is ensuring they know that it will not look brand new forever. No hyperbole at all, he is just speculating that without this disclaimer, low-life lawyers would take this and run with it. He is not making excuses for anyone.
    gregoriusmStrangeDaysRayz2016jony0
  • Reply 7 of 29
    mobirdmobird Posts: 620member
    I purchased a Vaja leather case for my iPhone X. They both are working great, the iPhone X is no where "long in the tooth" as some like to say and the iPhone offerings since the release of the iPhone X have had no benefit or compelling reason for me personally to upgrade.

    The real reason for my post is that my Vaja leather case looks better now then when it was new. It has character. Vaja makes some very fine leather cases.
    gregoriusmJapheyPetrolDaveJFC_PA
  • Reply 8 of 29
    elijahg said:
    sflocal said:
    I can only assume that Apple is putting out this PSA to stem the pond-scum lawyers from filing class-action lawsuits claiming Apple caused "irreparable damages" to users that bought a leather case and expected it to look brand new forever.

    Sad.
    What Apple is saying they already know their unreleased leather case could have an adverse reaction to their charging puck.  It's obvious they've worked to mitigate the issue but haven't found an acceptable answer to the problem.  Instead of putting out the case and letting the issue materialize and blow up (having you make excuses for it), they've decided to proactively and responsibly let customer know damage may happen (and you still manage to try to make feeble excuses for it).  Jeebus.

    What's sad is your apologist hyperbolic and totally unnecessary take on the situation.  You've taken Apple admitting there's a foreseeable problem and turned it into some fantasy expectation of brand new leather forever.  How does one go from zero to full Spinal Tap 11 so quickly and without cause?  Apple did a good thing.  The right thing. They really don't need people making exaggerated lame excuses.  They handled it properly.  
    You have got entirely the wrong end of the stick. sflocal literally says people might "expect it to look brand new forever", and Apple is ensuring they know that it will not look brand new forever. No hyperbole at all, he is just speculating that without this disclaimer, low-life lawyers would take this and run with it. He is not making excuses for anyone.
    His posting history says I'm more right than wrong.  My mans got an almost pathological desire to make excuses for every perceived Apple shortcoming.  Whether or not there's an actual shortcoming is immaterial.  No one thinks their cases are going to look brand new forever.  That's not even a realistic "might" and Apple is not ensuring anyone will know the case won't look brand new forever.  Apple is clearly stating the charging puck can leave an imprint on the case.  

    Apple has long ago addressed the fact the leather won't look brand new forever.  They tell you in the Support doc about cleaning Apple products:
    "The leather iPhone case is made from natural leather. Its appearance will change as you use it. It might acquire a patina and might change color due to the oils from your skin and direct sunlight, further enhancing the natural look"  Support doc

    Not looking brand new forever and the puck leaving an imprint on the case are unrelated topics.  Apple's advisory only addresses one of those and it ain't about looking brand new. 

    williamlondonmuthuk_vanalingamctt_zh
  • Reply 9 of 29
    JFC_PA said:
    Leather doesn’t block radio waves (RFID) that takes conductive metal. Which some leather cases incorporate just for that privacy feature. 
    There are also non-metallic materials which block radio waves.  For example, graphite (and its variants) is an exceptional radio frequency insulator.
    JFC_PAjony0
  • Reply 10 of 29

    rob53 said:
    sflocal said:
    I can only assume that Apple is putting out this PSA to stem the pond-scum lawyers from filing class-action lawsuits claiming Apple caused "irreparable damages" to users that bought a leather case and expected it to look brand new forever.

    Sad.
    My leather case for my iPhone 11 Pro Max, Otterbox Strada, is leather and it already has scratches on it, which makes it look like it's being used instead of simply sitting on the mantle. I was told leather acts as a barrier protecting RFID chips. Didn't realize that until I bought a leather wallet. I'm tired of people who think everything stays as perfect as it was when they bought it. The only way this happens is if you leave it in the box and put it in a safe. 

    I'd actually like it to be indented so it slips onto the charger. I tried a Qi charger and hated it so went back to the normal cable. Maybe the MagSafe will work better but nothing beats a cable for speed.
    It's interesting...  some people (including me) love leather because it "ages" and does not stay pristine.  Of course the negative is that it can age to the point where it becomes tattered.

    I bought a pair of Nomad Qi chargers and find they work very well.  We currently have a 11 Max, 11 Pro Max and a pair of SEs (all with leather cases) and they charge quickly and easily.  That said, wired is always best.
  • Reply 11 of 29

    Along with the warning about leather cases, Apple also provided MagSafe details and best practices. For example, Apple makes the following recommendations:
    • Don't place credit cards, security badges, passports, or key fobs between an iPhone and a MagSafe charger. Doing so may damage the magnetic strips or RFID tags in them.

    This is from Apple's product information page for its clip-on leather wallet: what gives?


  • Reply 12 of 29
    fred1fred1 Posts: 828member

    rob53 said:
    sflocal said:
    I can only assume that Apple is putting out this PSA to stem the pond-scum lawyers from filing class-action lawsuits claiming Apple caused "irreparable damages" to users that bought a leather case and expected it to look brand new forever.

    Sad.
    My leather case for my iPhone 11 Pro Max, Otterbox Strada, is leather and it already has scratches on it, which makes it look like it's being used instead of simply sitting on the mantle. I was told leather acts as a barrier protecting RFID chips. Didn't realize that until I bought a leather wallet. I'm tired of people who think everything stays as perfect as it was when they bought it. The only way this happens is if you leave it in the box and put it in a safe. 

    I'd actually like it to be indented so it slips onto the charger. I tried a Qi charger and hated it so went back to the normal cable. Maybe the MagSafe will work better but nothing beats a cable for speed.
    It's interesting...  some people (including me) love leather because it "ages" and does not stay pristine.  Of course the negative is that it can age to the point where it becomes tattered.

    I bought a pair of Nomad Qi chargers and find they work very well.  We currently have a 11 Max, 11 Pro Max and a pair of SEs (all with leather cases) and they charge quickly and easily.  That said, wired is always best.
    The other thing about leather is that if it’s of a decent quality, scratches can be rubbed out. Moisten the end of your finger and rub the scratches. They should go away unless they’re so deep that the leather is damaged. 
  • Reply 13 of 29
    boltsfan17boltsfan17 Posts: 2,273member

    Along with the warning about leather cases, Apple also provided MagSafe details and best practices. For example, Apple makes the following recommendations:
    • Don't place credit cards, security badges, passports, or key fobs between an iPhone and a MagSafe charger. Doing so may damage the magnetic strips or RFID tags in them.

    This is from Apple's product information page for its clip-on leather wallet: what gives?


    I'm guessing the clip on leather wallet is shielded to protect credit cards because it has a magnet inside of it. Not sure if you can even use the MagSafe charger on the phone when you have the leather wallet attached. From the way it sounds, if it does work, you probably want to remove it when you are charging the phone using MagSafe. 
    edited October 2020
  • Reply 14 of 29
    Anyone know the exact difference in charging time between cable and MagSafe?
  • Reply 15 of 29
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,561member
    sflocal said:
    I can only assume that Apple is putting out this PSA to stem the pond-scum lawyers from filing class-action lawsuits claiming Apple caused "irreparable damages" to users that bought a leather case and expected it to look brand new forever.

    Sad.
    What Apple is saying they already know their unreleased leather case could have an adverse reaction to their charging puck.  It's obvious they've worked to mitigate the issue but haven't found an acceptable answer to the problem.  Instead of putting out the case and letting the issue materialize and blow up (having you make excuses for it), they've decided to proactively and responsibly let customer know damage may happen (and you still manage to try to make feeble excuses for it).  Jeebus.

    What's sad is your apologist hyperbolic and totally unnecessary take on the situation.  You've taken Apple admitting there's a foreseeable problem and turned it into some fantasy expectation of brand new leather forever.  How does one go from zero to full Spinal Tap 11 so quickly and without cause?  Apple did a good thing.  The right thing. They really don't need people making exaggerated lame excuses.  They handled it properly.  
    What a messed up place it is inside your head. Gross. 
    Rayz2016jony0
  • Reply 16 of 29
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,561member

    Along with the warning about leather cases, Apple also provided MagSafe details and best practices. For example, Apple makes the following recommendations:
    • Don't place credit cards, security badges, passports, or key fobs between an iPhone and a MagSafe charger. Doing so may damage the magnetic strips or RFID tags in them.

    This is from Apple's product information page for its clip-on leather wallet: what gives?


    The two are not contradictory. The wallet being shielded doesn’t negate the advice not to place credit cards between the phone and charging puck. The wallet isn’t designed to do that anyway, when it’s snapped on you don’t place the MagSafe charging puck on, it’s an either or decision. 
    chabigRayz2016mike1jony0
  • Reply 17 of 29

    Along with the warning about leather cases, Apple also provided MagSafe details and best practices. For example, Apple makes the following recommendations:
    • Don't place credit cards, security badges, passports, or key fobs between an iPhone and a MagSafe charger. Doing so may damage the magnetic strips or RFID tags in them.

    This is from Apple's product information page for its clip-on leather wallet: what gives?


    I'm guessing the clip on leather wallet is shielded to protect credit cards because it has a magnet inside of it. Not sure if you can even use the MagSafe charger on the phone when you have the leather wallet attached. From the way it sounds, if it does work, you probably want to remove it when you are charging the phone using MagSafe. 
    Perhaps. We'll find out soon. But if what you say is the case (and that sounds reasonable), it would have been quite easy for Apple to mention it (e.g., "remove the wallet before charging with MagSafe" or something to that effect), no?
  • Reply 18 of 29
    bageljoeybageljoey Posts: 1,937member

    Along with the warning about leather cases, Apple also provided MagSafe details and best practices. For example, Apple makes the following recommendations:
    • Don't place credit cards, security badges, passports, or key fobs between an iPhone and a MagSafe charger. Doing so may damage the magnetic strips or RFID tags in them.

    This is from Apple's product information page for its clip-on leather wallet: what gives?


    I'm guessing the clip on leather wallet is shielded to protect credit cards because it has a magnet inside of it. Not sure if you can even use the MagSafe charger on the phone when you have the leather wallet attached. From the way it sounds, if it does work, you probably want to remove it when you are charging the phone using MagSafe. 
    Perhaps. We'll find out soon. But if what you say is the case (and that sounds reasonable), it would have been quite easy for Apple to mention it (e.g., "remove the wallet before charging with MagSafe" or something to that effect), no?
    I’m quite certain I have read that several times already...
  • Reply 19 of 29

    Along with the warning about leather cases, Apple also provided MagSafe details and best practices. For example, Apple makes the following recommendations:
    • Don't place credit cards, security badges, passports, or key fobs between an iPhone and a MagSafe charger. Doing so may damage the magnetic strips or RFID tags in them.

    This is from Apple's product information page for its clip-on leather wallet: what gives?


    I'm guessing the clip on leather wallet is shielded to protect credit cards because it has a magnet inside of it. Not sure if you can even use the MagSafe charger on the phone when you have the leather wallet attached. From the way it sounds, if it does work, you probably want to remove it when you are charging the phone using MagSafe. 
    According to the MKBHD video, you can't charge the device with the wallet attached.  That discussion starts at the 8:36 point in the video It shows the puck attaching to the wallet but not charging.  The unaccounted for variable in his video is the presence of the magsafe case.  Would the puck have charged through the wallet if the case wasn't there?  Idk, but I don't think so because of the shielding in wallet.  Again, Idk. 

  • Reply 20 of 29
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 622member
    JFC_PA said:
    Leather doesn’t block radio waves (RFID) that takes conductive metal. Which some leather cases incorporate just for that privacy feature. 
    There are also non-metallic materials which block radio waves.  For example, graphite (and its variants) is an exceptional radio frequency insulator.
    Thanks, I was focused on the more classic faraday cage materials, but for cases the list does expand and you’re right. 
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