Working Apple 1 pops up on eBay for $1.5M

Posted:
in General Discussion edited January 30
A rare functional example of Apple's first computer, the Apple 1, is up for sale on eBay, with its seller asking a cool $1.5 million for the privilege of owning a piece of tech history.

Apple 1


According to the item's description, first spotted by IGN, the model is verified as original by Corey Cohen, an Apple 1 expert whose knowledge is often sought for appraisals at larger auctions.

Known as the "Canadian" on Mike Willegal's Apple-1 registry, the example on eBay is one of six known surviving units to come housed in an original Byte Shop KOA wood case. It comes with an original power supply and Datanetics Version D keyboard, as well as a period-correct Sony TV-115 monitor with video modulator.

The Apple 1 board is unmodified and in "almost perfect" condition, according to the seller. It is also one of few remaining units to be fully operational, a point proved when it ran for over six hours a day while on display at the Vintage Computer Festival West in 2019.

Current owner Krishna B. Blake purchased the Apple 1 in 1978 from its original owner as part of a trade-in deal for a newer Apple II. Blake's computer store in Montreal was responsible for Apple II maintenance prior to Apple's entry into Canada.

Despite its pedigree and current state, the Apple 1 on sale through eBay might not fetch Blake's $1.5 million asking price. Other examples have come close to the $1 million barrier, the closest being a 2014 sale worth $905,000, but more recent auctions have drawn bids below $500,000.

A total of 200 Apple 1 computers were made, each hand-built by company cofounder Steve Wozniak in Steve Jobs' garage in Los Altos, Calif. When the product was first released in 1976, it sold for $666.66 without power supply, display, keyboard or housing.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    bluefire1bluefire1 Posts: 1,155member
    I wonder how much my 1984 Mac would go for these days.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 8
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 2,511member
    The rainbow coloured ribbon is reminiscent of Apple's logo.
    mknelsonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 8
    Ah, how I wish I had the time and money to spend on such a fine piece of tech history.

    In today’s world it has no real practical value, and would qualify as a white elephant collectible. It’d make a useful piece of hardware to learn 6502 programming on, and practice low-level coding, because it’s not likely to have much available that’ll run on it anyway.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 8
    Is there any games with it? 🤣
    cornchipwatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 8
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,457member
    bluefire1 said:
    I wonder how much my 1984 Mac would go for these days.
    My Apple IIe was worth about $10 many years ago.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 8
    XedXed Posts: 1,028member
    CiaranF said:
    Is there any games with it? 🤣
    Anything you can program with Apple BASIC… assuming it also comes with the original tape and you can get the Apple I to work with a cassette drive.
    cornchipwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 8
    XedXed Posts: 1,028member
    Using the below website the cost of the original Apple I would give you $220k in Apple stock if you invested that amount when the IPO opened in 1980. A rare time when investing is less valuable than collecting.

    https://www.fool.com/investing/2019/11/24/if-you-invested-100-in-apples-ipo-this-is-how-much.aspx
    edited January 30 watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 8
    Xed said:
    CiaranF said:
    Is there any games with it? 🤣
    Anything you can program with Apple BASIC… assuming it also comes with the original tape and you can get the Apple I to work with a cassette drive.
    The Apple I came with Integer BASIC: Applesoft BASIC didn’t exist early on. If you were concerned with floating point, you had to use a lot of code space to make that happen.

    The other language you could write games in is 6502 assembly/machine language.  This is what the majority of games for the Apple 2 series were written in, definitely anywhere performance was important, because no interpreted language was snappy.
    Xedwatto_cobra
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