Lastpass limiting free users to either computers or mobile apps in March

Posted:
in macOS edited February 16
LastPass is introducing limits to how it operates its service in March, restricting free-tier users to either computers, or iPhones and other mobile devices.




One of several prominent cross-platform password managers, LastPass offers users both a free service and premium options. With inbound changes starting from March, more of those free users maybe nudged towards paying the company.

Currently, passwords stored in the vault can be used across all of a user's devices, including web browsers on Macs and iPhones, to log in to apps, and on other platforms. From March 16, the company writes free users will be limited to using the service either on computers or on mobile devices.

Those opting for use on computers will continue using the service on any Mac or PC as usual. However, they won't be able to access their accounts on mobile devices like an iPhone or iPad without upgrading their service.

Likewise, a user selecting to use it with mobile devices will be limited to using LastPass Free on smartphones, tablets, and smartwatches. Access on desktops and notebooks would be prevented unless they upgraded.

The choice of which device type the users can use will be determined by their first login on or after March 16, with the choice made automatically based on what was used for that authentication. Users will then have three opportunities to switch device type before it sticks to a specific category.

Even after being limited to one type or another, LastPass states all devices will continue to synchronize automatically. There won't be any loss of data stored in a vault, nor will users be locked out of an account permanently.

This won't be the only change free users will face. On May 17, email support will be cut off for the free service and will be limited only to Premium and Families customers.

Access to the LastPass Support Center will continue for free users after that date.

The change seems to be an attempt to nudge its contingent of free users into the paid service. At this time, LastPass is offering the upgrade at a discount to $2.25 per month, billed annually at $27, instead of the usual $3-per-month cost.

Free users still have the option of shopping around for a different service, with other options including 1Password, Enpass, and Bitwarden. Mac and iPhone users will also be familiar with Apple's Keychain system, which offers many of the same capabilities.

Apple is also working to bring out iCloud Passwords for Windows, enabling the Keychain-stored passwords to be used in Google Chrome. However, access to the service was pulled shortly after launch due to some teething issues.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 9
    That is so arbitrary and capricious. Also probably confusing for users. If I read that correctly the free tier can either use only computer clients or mobile clients but not both? This makes no sense other than to be punitive to free tier users. 👎
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 9
    If Apple would tell me how to easily convert all my passwords from 1Password to its own Keychain/Vault, I would do it in a heartbeat. Fed up with being bled to death by subscriptions. Right now I am betwixt and between. Pretty much stopped using 1P and just use Apple when it asks me when I create a new password. 
    kkqd1337watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 9
    I do agree that an excellent password manager is worth paying for. But LastPass is not that password manager. It looks, feels, and operates like it hasn't been upgraded in decades.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 9
    maltzmaltz Posts: 229member
    If Apple would tell me how to easily convert all my passwords from 1Password to its own Keychain/Vault, I would do it in a heartbeat. Fed up with being bled to death by subscriptions. Right now I am betwixt and between. Pretty much stopped using 1P and just use Apple when it asks me when I create a new password. 

    Having been burned by iCloud syncing issues a few times, there's no way I'd let iCloud be the primary keeper of my passwords.  Also, keychain can't handle many of the things I use 1Password for - Multi-factor TOTP codes, notes, software licenses, etc.  And in my case, I also need cross-platform compatibility.

    BTW, you can still buy 1Password outright, without a subscription, but they don't make it easy to find.  You can still sync via Dropbox, too, but Dropbox recently limited their free accounts to 3 devices, so you might just be trading one subscription for another.
  • Reply 5 of 9
    The reduced price is only good for one year, so this is even worse than it looks. If anybody comes up with a workaround so I can use it on my two computers in multiple Apple devices, I would appreciate it
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 9
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,679member
    This is a scummy way to go about it. I imagine they thought about limiting to two devices then realised that most people just have a phone and a PC. 

    Wouldn’t touch this lot with a long pole. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 9
    rjwhisler said:
    The reduced price is only good for one year, so this is even worse than it looks. If anybody comes up with a workaround so I can use it on my two computers in multiple Apple devices, I would appreciate it
    Or, you know, you could actually pay for something you are getting value from. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 9
    mike54mike54 Posts: 412member
    I use KeePass on the computer and Apple's Keychain on the iPhone. No need to pay for anything. There are enough things to pay for without having to pay rent to someone to manage your passwords.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 9
    To all the cheapskates who want this for free: This is not like a word processor asking you to pay a subscription. A good password manager (like 1Password, which I use) is constantly changing their software to accommodate all sorts of crazy password schemes that appear on web sites. Like, for example, the split-between-two-pages username/password setup on some banks (and google). I hate subscription software, but even with out the cloud features, 1Password is earning their fees monthly. As it happens, I use the non-subscription version of 1P, but the next time I upgrade I will probably switch to the subscription version because of the family-sharing stuff they have.

    All that said, I don't know anything about LastPass, good or bad.

    As for Apple's stuff, it's way better than nothing at all, but it's not nearly as good as 1Password. The convenience features in 1P are easily worth $3/month to me.
    maltzwatto_cobra
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