Microsoft to release one-time purchase Office for Windows, macOS in 2021

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Microsoft has announced a new one-time purchase version of Microsoft Office that will debut later in 2021 for Windows and macOS.

Credit: WikiMedia Commons
Credit: WikiMedia Commons


The company said it plans to release both a Long-Term Servicing Channel variant of Microsoft Office and a version designed for consumers and small businesses. Like the previous Office 2019 release, both versions are designed for those who don't want to pay monthly for the cloud-based Microsoft 365 service.

Microsoft said that the LTSC version will include new updates like Dark Mode and accessibility improvements, as well features such as Dynamic Arrays and XLOOKUP in Excel. It's likely to include those features in the consumer Office 2021 too, but Microsoft is holding off on adding any details until closer to the release date. The company did say that it doesn't plan to change the one-time purchase cost.

Additionally, there's a new change to the support window for Office 2021 LSTC. The window is being bumped up to five years, instead of the seven years that it has typically provided. The cost is also increasing by 10%.

The Office 2021 LTSC will become available as a preview version in April, but the consumer version won't. Microsoft is eyeing a release in the second half for LTSC, though it isn't clear if it's planning the same for Office 2021.
Graeme000
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    OferOfer Posts: 89unconfirmed, member
    Any idea on whether it will be M1 native?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 22
    Ofer said:
    Any idea on whether it will be M1 native?
    Considering they updated Office 2019/365 with M1 support in December there is no reason to think otherwise.
    Rayz2016watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 22
    tzeshantzeshan Posts: 2,351member
    Ofer said:
    Any idea on whether it will be M1 native?
    Of course, a simple recompile will do. That does not cost Microsoft anything.
  • Reply 4 of 22
    Can you imagine no monthly cost for Adobe Suite? That would be $9000 for the whole suite.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 22
    From the article, "The window is being bumped up to five years, instead of the seven years that it has typically provided."

    Don't you mean, "dropped down to five years, instead of the seven years that it has typically provided."?
    mike1MisterKitAlex1Ndysamoriawatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 22
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,012member
    nicholfd said:
    From the article, "The window is being bumped up to five years, instead of the seven years that it has typically provided."

    Don't you mean, "dropped down to five years, instead of the seven years that it has typically provided.”?
    Proof reading is a lost art and takes too much time anyway. What do editors do these days instead of editing?
    mike1Alex1Ndysamoriawatto_cobraNiallivm
  • Reply 7 of 22
    It's been years, no decades, since I used Office on a PC. Missing from Office on Macs is MS Access. 

    The last stable and functional version of Access I used was Access '97. The later versions I attempted to use were unstable, losing foreign key definitions being the most obvious problem. Back then, I was certain Access needed to be rewritten from the ground up to remove all the underlying hack code that made it unstable. 

    Is Access a dead-end product for MS? It's offered only on PC versions of Office. From my perspective, it's the only desktop level database that has reasonable functionality. No other product has a reasonable relational db back end, and a nicely integrated front end. Claris is awful from every vantage point: functionality, cost, value. 

    The result of no viable fully functional integrated desktop DBMS is we're relegated to using spreadsheets which isn't the same thing at all. 


    edited February 19 h4y3sdysamoriamuthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 22
    Ofer said:
    Any idea on whether it will be M1 native?

    Why would they need that? That is Apple's problem they drove themseleves into. Honestly, making propriatery hardware is not the best idea in general. Linux is already ported to M1, but developers already discovered a lot of stupidity on M1 hardware and many pieces that are not innovation, but restriction slowing down. Read articles on other technology portals.

    In other words, unless Apple proves that M1 serves purpose properly and is available to all vendors including those who do not use official channels or contracts on Apple's terms it may be ignored. That may be mistake by Cook's team and one day they may find themselves in position Apple was in '90. Well Job's passed away so there will be nobody to come and rescue Apple again.

    Start publishing ARM M1 specs and enable platform for all and products will show up on Apple computers. For now, many do not exist and some even say: "Available on Big Sur for intel based computers only." Do they really need to accommodate Apple's marketing and secrecy moves? Time to learn from mistakes and read on what was happening 15 and 25 years ago and why Apple switched to Intel at some point. After all you have mainstream ARM already on the market and Apple did not decide to go that route even when it has stakes in SoftBank that holds many patents on ARM.
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 9 of 22

    Can you imagine no monthly cost for Adobe Suite? That would be $9000 for the whole suite.

    That is the reason why we kept our studio on outdated CS6 and High Sierra until recently. Adobe's greed does not justify periodic publishing projects to correct what friends in India screwed up not knowing publishing requirements properlyor how to do publishing editing as per author requests.

    Unfortunatelly, January 31, 2020 came with Apple support end and we had too move to Big Sur and Catalina on some hardware (dreadful Catalina that does not even want to run Timemachine backups being stuck on "Preparing backup" for days!).
    GeorgeBMacnetlingdysamoria
  • Reply 10 of 22
    tzeshan said:
    Ofer said:
    Any idea on whether it will be M1 native?
    Of course, a simple recompile will do. That does not cost Microsoft anything.

    No it would not. It is not as simple. That is also reason why some software could not work when Apple moved to from HFS to APFS. I wonder how much work expereince you have in migrating software and retesting. Probably not much. I have seen this attitude "recompile and run" few times in business over three decades in IT now and it was not too good. Mostly this is idea of young and immature people.
    GeorgeBMacdysamoria
  • Reply 11 of 22
    wood1208wood1208 Posts: 2,506member
    Ofer said:
    Any idea on whether it will be M1 native?

    Why would they need that? That is Apple's problem they drove themseleves into. Honestly, making propriatery hardware is not the best idea in general. Linux is already ported to M1, but developers already discovered a lot of stupidity on M1 hardware and many pieces that are not innovation, but restriction slowing down. Read articles on other technology portals.

    In other words, unless Apple proves that M1 serves purpose properly and is available to all vendors including those who do not use official channels or contracts on Apple's terms it may be ignored. That may be mistake by Cook's team and one day they may find themselves in position Apple was in '90. Well Job's passed away so there will be nobody to come and rescue Apple again.

    Start publishing ARM M1 specs and enable platform for all and products will show up on Apple computers. For now, many do not exist and some even say: "Available on Big Sur for intel based computers only." Do they really need to accommodate Apple's marketing and secrecy moves? Time to learn from mistakes and read on what was happening 15 and 25 years ago and why Apple switched to Intel at some point. After all you have mainstream ARM already on the market and Apple did not decide to go that route even when it has stakes in SoftBank that holds many patents on ARM.

    You prediction is based on past when Apple didn't have their own processor team to create M1 CPU/GPU against Intel's years of entrenched processor design capability. Now Apple do. When apple decides to go into creating hardware/software platform or gadget; with such talented large team than in past, Apple thinks through not for near future but very long term. Time will tell but not to worry what Apple is doing with M1. Going forward, it will be high performance, low power consumption, well integrated platform and for Apps, will take time to port most but will be their.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 22
    larryjw said:
    It's been years, no decades, since I used Office on a PC. Missing from Office on Macs is MS Access. 

    The last stable and functional version of Access I used was Access '97. The later versions I attempted to use were unstable, losing foreign key definitions being the most obvious problem. Back then, I was certain Access needed to be rewritten from the ground up to remove all the underlying hack code that made it unstable. 

    Is Access a dead-end product for MS? It's offered only on PC versions of Office. From my perspective, it's the only desktop level database that has reasonable functionality. No other product has a reasonable relational db back end, and a nicely integrated front end. Claris is awful from every vantage point: functionality, cost, value. 

    The result of no viable fully functional integrated desktop DBMS is we're relegated to using spreadsheets which isn't the same thing at all. 



    I used that version to interface between mainframe applications and databases, Excel Spreadsheets and Access screens and its database effectively.

    But, the root of the system was the mainframe databases that insured data security and integrity.  The spreadsheets and Access added considerably to functionality and user efficiency and control -- but I never trusted them to be the core of the system.  There were just too many possible points of failure.
    Alex1N
  • Reply 13 of 22
    flydogflydog Posts: 926member
    tzeshan said:
    Ofer said:
    Any idea on whether it will be M1 native?
    Of course, a simple recompile will do. That does not cost Microsoft anything.
    No, it’s not “a simple recompile.”
    dysamoria
  • Reply 14 of 22
    tzeshan said:
    Ofer said:
    Any idea on whether it will be M1 native?
    Of course, a simple recompile will do. That does not cost Microsoft anything.

    Don't listen to the others... They are discounting the FACT that M$ already has Office Apps for iPad/iOS and so it IS a matter of re-compiling, TO A DEGREE.  You see, the new Mac M1 is ARM's based and is on the same chip architecture as the iPad/iPhone/Apple TV, so if you have an iOS App version, porting it over is actually pretty simple, when compared to porting from Intel to Arm... BUT again, this is assuming they have an iOS/iPad version of Office, which they mostly do.  Now I DO agree with others, it's not just a straight forward port, you always have to Alpha test, Beta test, update for mouse/screen, etc. but we are not talking about a complete re-write.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 22
    Can you imagine no monthly cost for Adobe Suite? That would be $9000 for the whole suite.

    If it was up to Adobe, they would take our first-born child, force him/her into the Advertising world, not allow for freelancers, especially overseas ones, crush all Open Source competitors and charge us the $9,000 upfront and a year later charges us $5,000 upgrade fee that actually didn't add new features but just fixed the bugs in the original product we purchased, but they would highlight the fact their crappie algorithms from 1990 have been improved by 25%, which is only 10,000% slower than modern updated algorithms they refuse to license or buy from its creators. 

    Long live Quark Xpress!!  Adobe should have never been allowed to purchase Macromedia, period!  While there are competitors to Adobe, none of them are serious hundred million dollars, VC or publicly traded companies other than Corel Draw, they don't take competition seriously, thus it's just there...
    edited February 19 GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 22
    Can you imagine no monthly cost for Adobe Suite? That would be $9000 for the whole suite.
    Or, just buy the pieces you need, when you need them. I use just a couple parts of Office or the Adobe Suite, and they last me yeeeaaaars. The cost of the one or two modules spread out over that duration is less than paying rent on them each & every month for the rest of my life.

    I like Panic's approach -- buy the version you want when you want it, get support for a year, and keep it as-is after. If you want new features or new support, renew it at a discount. Rented software is not the only solution. 
    dysamoriawatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 22
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 2,944member
    It would. be really nice if they had a way to charge based on usage. I prefer Pages & Numbers for general use, but there are rare times when I need to use Word or Excel, generally a couple times a month. It's a total waste to buy an annual subscription for such sporadic use.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 22
    dysamoriadysamoria Posts: 3,208member
    netling said:
    Can you imagine no monthly cost for Adobe Suite? That would be $9000 for the whole suite.

    If it was up to Adobe, they would take our first-born child, force him/her into the Advertising world, not allow for freelancers, especially overseas ones, crush all Open Source competitors and charge us the $9,000 upfront and a year later charges us $5,000 upgrade fee that actually didn't add new features but just fixed the bugs in the original product we purchased, but they would highlight the fact their crappie algorithms from 1990 have been improved by 25%, which is only 10,000% slower than modern updated algorithms they refuse to license or buy from its creators. 

    Long live Quark Xpress!!  Adobe should have never been allowed to purchase Macromedia, period!  While there are competitors to Adobe, none of them are serious hundred million dollars, VC or publicly traded companies other than Corel Draw, they don't take competition seriously, thus it's just there...
    I don’t want the products I buy/use to be owned by public companies or driven by vulture capitalists...
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 22
    netling said:
    tzeshan said:
    Ofer said:
    Any idea on whether it will be M1 native?
    Of course, a simple recompile will do. That does not cost Microsoft anything.

    Don't listen to the others... They are discounting the FACT that M$ already has Office Apps for iPad/iOS and so it IS a matter of re-compiling, TO A DEGREE.  You see, the new Mac M1 is ARM's based and is on the same chip architecture as the iPad/iPhone/Apple TV, so if you have an iOS App version, porting it over is actually pretty simple, when compared to porting from Intel to Arm... BUT again, this is assuming they have an iOS/iPad version of Office, which they mostly do.  Now I DO agree with others, it's not just a straight forward port, you always have to Alpha test, Beta test, update for mouse/screen, etc. but we are not talking about a complete re-write.
    That’s true, for their native iOS apps. But, Microsoft also has macOS native office apps which would need some rework, and that will be somewhat dependent on the support their dev tools have for compiling for ARM. I’ve not heard reports of this being a massive undertaking, but not trivial either. There’s a reason Apple put so much effort into Rosetta 2 after all.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 22
    Would be nice if Microsoft would think about actually including functionality to review and check formula in Excel for Mac. It’s been in planning for years. Microsoft simply don’t care about Mac users. I couldn’t care less about dark mode I just want to be able to check 3 lines of formula. This is a basic piece of functionality that’s part of Excel but not if you run a Mac.  
    watto_cobra
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