Smaller Mac Pro, 2021 iMac redesign with color options shown off by prolific leaker

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  • Reply 81 of 122
    dysamoria said:
    sflocal said:
    avon b7 said:
    No chin, at last!

    But I've had it with all-in-ones. I'll never buy a desktop Mac with the screen glued onto it again. 
    Your complaint is moot.  I think the new iMacs will be essentially a giant iPad with everything soldered in.  Gone will be the days where one could at least upgrade the RAM.

    What's your beef with removing the display?  Open that display once (or twice) ever in its life it too much?  I can remove and reinstall my iMac display in minutes.  It's a non-issue.
    You don’t end up with dust all over the LCD panel? I don’t know how much they changed it since the 2011 model, but that one is an effing PITA to manipulate everything AND you WILL end up with dust and whatnot stuck to the LCD before you get the glass back over it.
    Incorrect.  You don't have to manipulate everything, but you do have to use care and the proper cloth to make sure there is no dust on the LCD when you re-seat the glass.  The LCD panel on the 2011 and earlier iMacs is physically attached to the main chassis with 8 screws.  The glass is held on by magnets.  Using a proper microfiber cloth and following simple directions, you can set the glass on the bottom edge of the 'chin' and wipe both the LCD and inside of the glass removing the dust and then set the glass back onto the chassis.  Apple uses a special roller that removes the dust when replacing the glass.  I did it many times when I upgraded my 27" 2011 iMac with two 1TB SSDs on the internal SATA ports and also replaced a dead optical drive.  Over time, dust does begin to accumulate on the LCD from general use because there is a 2mm gap between the LCD and the glass panel, requiring you to remove the glass and do a wipe down to restore the clarity of the display.   The Thunderbolt Displays were the same way.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 82 of 122
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,678member

    mjtomlin said:

    My 2009 27" i7 still runs fine after 11 years of use... and 99.999999% of that of that time it has been powered on. 
    Only 30 seconds of downtime over 11 years, that's amazing. I managed a system with 99.9% uptime, and that was difficult. We even maintained the system when the province-wide electrical power went off for a week. Which was kind of funny because nobody in the province could use our system when the province had no electricity for the population. But we were up.

    Okay, I got a little overzealous with the 9's in the percentage, but the point I was making was that if it was plugged in and had power, it has always been powered on - I do not turn it off. I even used it as my entertainment center (TV, DVD player, and stereo) for more than half of its lifetime. And I've never had problem with it overheating.
  • Reply 83 of 122

    mjtomlin said:
    dysamoria said:
    mjtomlin said:

    sflocal said:
    avon b7 said:
    No chin, at last!

    But I've had it with all-in-ones. I'll never buy a desktop Mac with the screen glued onto it again. 
    Your complaint is moot.  I think the new iMacs will be essentially a giant iPad with everything soldered in.  Gone will be the days where one could at least upgrade the RAM.

    What's your beef with removing the display?  Open that display once (or twice) ever in its life it too much?  I can remove and reinstall my iMac display in minutes.  It's a non-issue.
    You expect average people to remove the iMac's display? That's pretty unreasonable.

    And from my perspective you're missing the point. If something goes wrong with the CPU or other core component, when the screen is still fine, then there's no reason to remove the screen. The whole point to having a separate screen is so that you don't have to throw out the monitor when the CPU dies. Both of my last two iMacs have given me blue screens of death every week after the first three years (with nothing but Apple's OS on the system.) Yes, I've reinstalled the OS and taken them in to Apple for testing, and they could find nothing. It's just random crashing, and it feels like the Intel CPU. I will never buy an Intel CPU again, even though I can't prove that that's the cause of the problem.

    I've had to throw out my iMac screens with my CPUs because they are built in and can't be separated every time the CPU dies. What a waste. 

    It extremely unreasonable to believe that average people actually do anything to upgrade their systems. Most don't and those that do, have someone else do it.

    And, I think you're missing the point... If you don't like AIO then don't buy one. A lot of people do like them and it's nice HAVING A CHOICE.

    Also, aren't all laptops AIO systems? Are you going to argue that they are a waste as well?
    You said it’s nice having a choice? Well where is the choice for those of us who don’t want the all-in-one? Plenty of us want a nice large display, made by Apple, and a power-user machine that’s made with a thermally tolerant design and the ability to replace storage devices and RAM. Where’s our choice?

    Haha. Give me a break. So now Apple should make products that fit everyone's needs? Apple doesn't owe you a standalone display. Apple makes the products they want to make. You don't like what they offer you do have a choice. Many choices! It's not Apple's fault you don't like what those alternatives are.
    You are forgetting that Apple was once the leader in quality displays, going all the way back to the Sony Trinitron based Apple Color 13" Display, and many to follow up to the Thunderbolt Display that many people could easily afford at $999.  It was an embarrassment and an insult for Apple to return to the market with the ridiculously priced $4,999 Pro Display, and then have the nerve to charge $999 for a required stand!  The boos in the crowd were easily heard.  It is Apple's fault, and it is insulting.  They sell a Mac mini for well under a thousand, and then have the nerve to tell their customers to buy a $6,000 display to go with it?  That is exactly what they are doing in their advertising of the product.
    edited February 2021 elijahgmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 84 of 122
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,678member
    avon b7 said:
    No chin, at last!

    But I've had it with all-in-ones. I'll never buy a desktop Mac with the screen glued onto it again. 
    As a guy who built PCs for decades, I love my iMac AIOs. My last one lasted 8 years, by the time it was done even the screen was out of date. My new one is 10 lbs lighter and is VESA arm mounted, giving me an ultra clean desk free of any clutter or cables. 

    Never cared about the chin. Such complaints seem to be academic ones held by people not actually using the product. You’re in that category too, aren’t you?

    Agreed. AIO's have been my form factor of choice since my Mac SE. Which still runs by the way!

    Been waiting a long time to get a new iMac. Was gonna be last year, until they announced the move to Apple silicon. So, I'm hoping this will finally be the year my 2009 iMac is "retired" from being my workhorse Mac. It has in a way already, it doubles as an external display for my M1 mini. But is still used for software that won't work on the new mini (VMware Fusion and Coda).

    I hope that's one feature of the iMacs that return - Target Display Mode.
    edited February 2021 dewme
  • Reply 85 of 122
    Lots of chatting about mini Mac Pros and expandable iMacs.  Have you all not seen the writing on the wall with the M1 Macs?  Everything forward, except for the current Mac Pro Tower, will be non-expandable and non-upgradable.  The M Chip controls everything on the board, and controls way too much.  Memory is now on the chip so you will never see a Mac with user-upgradable memory, except for the current Mac Pro.  The M chip, like the T2, has way too much control of the flash storage, which Apple will keep it soldered on all Macs going forward.  That is dangerous because if a chip fails on the board, your data is history.  Gone are the days of pulling a drive or SSD blade and recovering data for anything not yet backed up.  So we will be stuck paying the Apple Tax with excessive prices for memory and storage.

    Didn't Apple learn their lesson with the failed Power Mac G4 Cube and Trash Can Mac Pro from 2013?  The G4 Cube failed because it was $200 more than the faster and more expandable Power Mac G4, so no one bought the Cube.  You can see the same occurring if they do it again.  The iMacs will be more powerful, with a 5K display, and likely cost less than some Mini Pro.  Look what they did when they brought back the tower Mac Pro.  They jacked up the price from $2,499 to $5,999, and everyone was pi$$ed!  The 2013 Mac Pro was a thermal failure.  They could not even update it, ever.  So they will come out with some M-based 'Cube' and overprice it.

    And the guy claiming he could get into an iMac and replace the glass in minutes?  Only if it is 2011 or earlier with the magnetic glass, but it takes a lot more than minutes to remove the internal LCD panel, replace it, clean the glass and place it back on the iMac without any dust inside.  The 2012 and later iMacs with the adhesive display is not difficult to open, but takes some time to slice through the adhesive with the proper opening tool, remove the display, and then remove the existing adhesive on both the display and the iMac, then lay down new adhesive pieces in the correct places, and then carefully line up and replace the display.  The only benefit is that the glass and LCD are fused together so you don't have to worry about dust between the glass and the LCD.  I have done that twice to a 21.5" iMac and a 27" iMac to upgrade memory and install SSDs in both.  The 21.5" iMac is a bear because you have to strip the iMac completely to remove the logic board to get to the RAM slots on the backside of the board.
    elijahgfastasleepmuthuk_vanalingammichelb76
  • Reply 86 of 122
    thrangthrang Posts: 1,012member
    dbvapor said:
    Those colors are weak.  Wish Apple would be more bold with their colors.  Everything lately is so muted and unsaturated.  
    Completely disagree.  I think they look great and will be well received by the market.  Too bad the reveal has been spoiled.
    Well, given that these are concepts done by someone who has too much time on their hands, I dont know that we can say that anything has been spoiled. And its obvious that the entire line will be upgraded to MXx or whatever variant...
  • Reply 87 of 122
    dysamoria said:
    sflocal said:
    avon b7 said:
    No chin, at last!

    But I've had it with all-in-ones. I'll never buy a desktop Mac with the screen glued onto it again. 
    Your complaint is moot.  I think the new iMacs will be essentially a giant iPad with everything soldered in.  Gone will be the days where one could at least upgrade the RAM.

    What's your beef with removing the display?  Open that display once (or twice) ever in its life it too much?  I can remove and reinstall my iMac display in minutes.  It's a non-issue.
    You don’t end up with dust all over the LCD panel? I don’t know how much they changed it since the 2011 model, but that one is an effing PITA to manipulate everything AND you WILL end up with dust and whatnot stuck to the LCD before you get the glass back over it.
    I've done this many times with the 2011 models and that's never happened to me.
  • Reply 88 of 122
    mjtomlin said:

    mjtomlin said:

    My 2009 27" i7 still runs fine after 11 years of use... and 99.999999% of that of that time it has been powered on. 
    Only 30 seconds of downtime over 11 years, that's amazing. I managed a system with 99.9% uptime, and that was difficult. We even maintained the system when the province-wide electrical power went off for a week. Which was kind of funny because nobody in the province could use our system when the province had no electricity for the population. But we were up.

    Okay, I got a little overzealous with the 9's in the percentage, but the point I was making was that if it was plugged in and had power, it has always been powered on - I do not turn it off. I even used it as my entertainment center (TV, DVD player, and stereo) for more than half of its lifetime. And I've never had problem with it overheating.
    I was just having some fun with my post. We all know the point you were making. I was doing some friendly teasing. Is there an emoji to indicate "friendly teasing"? Maybe this one? 😏
  • Reply 89 of 122

    dysamoria said:
    mjtomlin said:

    sflocal said:
    avon b7 said:
    No chin, at last!

    But I've had it with all-in-ones. I'll never buy a desktop Mac with the screen glued onto it again. 
    Your complaint is moot.  I think the new iMacs will be essentially a giant iPad with everything soldered in.  Gone will be the days where one could at least upgrade the RAM.

    What's your beef with removing the display?  Open that display once (or twice) ever in its life it too much?  I can remove and reinstall my iMac display in minutes.  It's a non-issue.
    You expect average people to remove the iMac's display? That's pretty unreasonable.

    And from my perspective you're missing the point. If something goes wrong with the CPU or other core component, when the screen is still fine, then there's no reason to remove the screen. The whole point to having a separate screen is so that you don't have to throw out the monitor when the CPU dies. Both of my last two iMacs have given me blue screens of death every week after the first three years (with nothing but Apple's OS on the system.) Yes, I've reinstalled the OS and taken them in to Apple for testing, and they could find nothing. It's just random crashing, and it feels like the Intel CPU. I will never buy an Intel CPU again, even though I can't prove that that's the cause of the problem.

    I've had to throw out my iMac screens with my CPUs because they are built in and can't be separated every time the CPU dies. What a waste. 

    It extremely unreasonable to believe that average people actually do anything to upgrade their systems. Most don't and those that do, have someone else do it.

    And, I think you're missing the point... If you don't like AIO then don't buy one. A lot of people do like them and it's nice HAVING A CHOICE.

    Also, aren't all laptops AIO systems? Are you going to argue that they are a waste as well?
    You said it’s nice having a choice? Well where is the choice for those of us who don’t want the all-in-one? Plenty of us want a nice large display, made by Apple, and a power-user machine that’s made with a thermally tolerant design and the ability to replace storage devices and RAM. Where’s our choice?
    For now, they're right in front of your face:
    Mac Pro - Apple
    Pro Display XDR - Technical Specifications - Apple

    I will bet good money that if they follow through with this mini-Pro type Mac and a prosumer level display that are both even half the price of the products above, you'll STILL find something to complain about and not buy them, and talk about it for another 8 years. "That's why I didn't buy the 2013 Mac Pro" 🙄
  • Reply 90 of 122
    Lots of chatting about mini Mac Pros and expandable iMacs.  Have you all not seen the writing on the wall with the M1 Macs?  Everything forward, except for the current Mac Pro Tower, will be non-expandable and non-upgradable.  The M Chip controls everything on the board, and controls way too much.  Memory is now on the chip so you will never see a Mac with user-upgradable memory, except for the current Mac Pro.  The M chip, like the T2, has way too much control of the flash storage, which Apple will keep it soldered on all Macs going forward.  That is dangerous because if a chip fails on the board, your data is history.  Gone are the days of pulling a drive or SSD blade and recovering data for anything not yet backed up.  So we will be stuck paying the Apple Tax with excessive prices for memory and storage.
    The Mac Pro has T2 and removable storage, so clearly it can be done. 
  • Reply 91 of 122
    Lots of chatting about mini Mac Pros and expandable iMacs.  Have you all not seen the writing on the wall with the M1 Macs?  Everything forward, except for the current Mac Pro Tower, will be non-expandable and non-upgradable.  The M Chip controls everything on the board, and controls way too much.  Memory is now on the chip so you will never see a Mac with user-upgradable memory, except for the current Mac Pro.  The M chip, like the T2, has way too much control of the flash storage, which Apple will keep it soldered on all Macs going forward.  That is dangerous because if a chip fails on the board, your data is history.  Gone are the days of pulling a drive or SSD blade and recovering data for anything not yet backed up.  So we will be stuck paying the Apple Tax with excessive prices for memory and storage.

    Didn't Apple learn their lesson with the failed Power Mac G4 Cube and Trash Can Mac Pro from 2013?  The G4 Cube failed because it was $200 more than the faster and more expandable Power Mac G4, so no one bought the Cube.  You can see the same occurring if they do it again.  The iMacs will be more powerful, with a 5K display, and likely cost less than some Mini Pro.  Look what they did when they brought back the tower Mac Pro.  They jacked up the price from $2,499 to $5,999, and everyone was pi$$ed!  The 2013 Mac Pro was a thermal failure.  They could not even update it, ever.  So they will come out with some M-based 'Cube' and overprice it.

    And the guy claiming he could get into an iMac and replace the glass in minutes?  Only if it is 2011 or earlier with the magnetic glass, but it takes a lot more than minutes to remove the internal LCD panel, replace it, clean the glass and place it back on the iMac without any dust inside.  The 2012 and later iMacs with the adhesive display is not difficult to open, but takes some time to slice through the adhesive with the proper opening tool, remove the display, and then remove the existing adhesive on both the display and the iMac, then lay down new adhesive pieces in the correct places, and then carefully line up and replace the display.  The only benefit is that the glass and LCD are fused together so you don't have to worry about dust between the glass and the LCD.  I have done that twice to a 21.5" iMac and a 27" iMac to upgrade memory and install SSDs in both.  The 21.5" iMac is a bear because you have to strip the iMac completely to remove the logic board to get to the RAM slots on the backside of the board.
    I will make a mental note to pay attention to your posts in the future, based on this quality post (which is not to say I agree 100%.) Your comments on SSDs scared me but I have a growing tendency to store my data on iCloud so that may mitigate that risk.
  • Reply 92 of 122
    Pricepoint for peformance is going to be a thing. My $2300 hackintosh outperforms the iMac Pro, and no way I can justify 4K for a Mini Mac Pro if the performance is not at least triple that. I'm fully expecting non-replaceable components, so the Mx Mac I'll buy better last long or it'll have to be dirt-cheap.
  • Reply 93 of 122
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,801member
    avon b7 said:
    avon b7 said:
    No chin, at last!

    But I've had it with all-in-ones. I'll never buy a desktop Mac with the screen glued onto it again. 
    As a guy who built PCs for decades, I love my iMac AIOs. My last one lasted 8 years, by the time it was done even the screen was out of date. My new one is 10 lbs lighter and is VESA arm mounted, giving me an ultra clean desk free of any clutter or cables. 

    Never cared about the chin. Such complaints seem to be academic ones held by people not actually using the product. You’re in that category too, aren’t you?
    You may not have had problems due to AOI design issues - and that's what they were - but I and many, many others did. 

    Try looking into 2009 27" i7 models which were literally 'designed' to slow cook themselves. Or put another way, they were nowhere near efficient enough with the thermals. 

    'hidden' Air inlets prone to clogging with dust. Impossibilty get dust out of the machines. Inaccessible entry point requiring glass and display removal. Poor thermals in general. System fans not running fast enough and the killer: throwing Radeon graphics cards into that soup and seeing them fail as a result.

    Under warranty Apple would gladly throw another identical card into that soup but it would almost certainly meet the same fate. 

    Back in the day I did some research on the issue and found it to be VERY widespread. 

    I still have that machine but it will only boot into safe mode. 

    The screen is perfect but unusable because its tied to the machine. RAM is perfect. Disk is perfect etc.

    The root problem is the design. Then fans not running nearly fast enough (probably not to 'annoy' users) and the combination of the i7 and the Radeon. 

    Now, I would love for someone to dig into this particular scenario and force Apple to hand over data on exactly how many  systems failed in this setting according to its records (in or out of warranty). 

    The chin is very dated. That's why they'll surely get rid of it. A move that is long overdue. 
    What are you on about? You just listed a bunch of problems, some specific about a model from over a decade ago, and some general issues you have with AIO, but doesn't seem to have anything to do w/ chins, or negate the value proposition that exists for AIO computers.

    The chin exists as part of the form factor used to provide room for components & cooling. It goes without saying that as miniaturization continues and components are consolidated further, it won't be necessary. This isn't a prophetic observation. Until that becomes true, I still have never run into an issue using my iMacs with chins. I haven't ever spent even a single second lamenting that my machine has one. Again, I find it's an academic "issue" people who don't own the device have. I get the impression you don't use an iMac so you confirm the pattern...shrug. I don't think Apple is designing computers for what fans of Chinese knockoffs are using, but who knows

    Also, your screen from 2009 would look pretty awful compared to a current screen. I sure wouldn't want to work on it.
    I mentioned that model because I have direct experience with it and know what the underlying problems are with AOI iMacs. It isn't the only iMac or (Apple laptop for that matter) that has suffered from poor thermal design. 

    The look is dated. I'm speaking from an aesthetic perspective.

    The screen was awesome for my needs. I don't need a retina display, or hi tech bells and whistles. 
  • Reply 94 of 122
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,801member
    dysamoria said:
    sflocal said:
    avon b7 said:
    No chin, at last!

    But I've had it with all-in-ones. I'll never buy a desktop Mac with the screen glued onto it again. 
    Your complaint is moot.  I think the new iMacs will be essentially a giant iPad with everything soldered in.  Gone will be the days where one could at least upgrade the RAM.

    What's your beef with removing the display?  Open that display once (or twice) ever in its life it too much?  I can remove and reinstall my iMac display in minutes.  It's a non-issue.
    You don’t end up with dust all over the LCD panel? I don’t know how much they changed it since the 2011 model, but that one is an effing PITA to manipulate everything AND you WILL end up with dust and whatnot stuck to the LCD before you get the glass back over it.
    Incorrect.  You don't have to manipulate everything, but you do have to use care and the proper cloth to make sure there is no dust on the LCD when you re-seat the glass.  The LCD panel on the 2011 and earlier iMacs is physically attached to the main chassis with 8 screws.  The glass is held on by magnets.  Using a proper microfiber cloth and following simple directions, you can set the glass on the bottom edge of the 'chin' and wipe both the LCD and inside of the glass removing the dust and then set the glass back onto the chassis.  Apple uses a special roller that removes the dust when replacing the glass.  I did it many times when I upgraded my 27" 2011 iMac with two 1TB SSDs on the internal SATA ports and also replaced a dead optical drive.  Over time, dust does begin to accumulate on the LCD from general use because there is a 2mm gap between the LCD and the glass panel, requiring you to remove the glass and do a wipe down to restore the clarity of the display.   The Thunderbolt Displays were the same way.
    Yep. I had an iMac HD replaced in-situ and the technician had the drive replaced in basically no time but then proceeded to take an eternity to clean the panel and the glass using the Apple Developed iMac dust removal kit (roller and adhesive strips to run the roller over and then roll onto the panel). 

    An example of terrible design. He absolutely hated it, commenting that to get a faulty or failing battery out, it required an almost complete tear down of the machine. 

    Getting into the machine through the screen (given the Internal design and dust issues) was a stupid idea.




    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 95 of 122
    MacQuadra840av said:
    Lots of chatting about mini Mac Pros and expandable iMacs.  Have you all not seen the writing on the wall with the M1 Macs?  Everything forward, except for the current Mac Pro Tower, will be non-expandable and non-upgradable.  The M Chip controls everything on the board, and controls way too much.  Memory is now on the chip so you will never see a Mac with user-upgradable memory, except for the current Mac Pro.  The M chip, like the T2, has way too much control of the flash storage, which Apple will keep it soldered on all Macs going forward.  That is dangerous because if a chip fails on the board, your data is history.  Gone are the days of pulling a drive or SSD blade and recovering data for anything not yet backed up.  So we will be stuck paying the Apple Tax with excessive prices for memory and storage.
    *****

    First of all, by way of preamble, let me just say that I’m a long-time reader, but that I have joined the site just to answer your claim above (in bold). A long, long time ago in a place far, far away, I used to be an Apple technician. I would actually counter your point here by observing that Apple has already laid the technical groundwork for this with TimeMachine. In my experience, the Apple SSDs tend not to fail so often, although there were some problems in the past with the Nvidia GPUs, and, in the early days, the truly rubbish SATA drives that came preinstalled by default on some of the Intel models. For what it’s worth, this was never a problem on the G4 models, both desktop and laptop, so I’m not really sure what happened there to make for that noticeable diminishment in quality. However, from the introduction of the Thunderbolt models onwards –– and earlier with the introduction of OS X Leopard –– Apple has made it really very simple to ensure all your data has been backed up and thoroughly catalogued. Even in those cases where a main logic board (MLB) had to be replaced, it was typically the GPU rather than the Intel CPU, that caused the failure; it was a relatively straightforward procedure to replace it. Provided users heed Apple’s advice (and like I said, Apple does make backing up your data so easy it is essentially an act of negligence not to use the tools included), replacing the MLB if the M1 chip does fault –– which, if their track record to date with their Ax chips is anything to go by, is a big ‘if’ –– then this really ought not to happen. And if it does, I would expect this to be as simple a procedure as ever it was to replace the MLB and restore the data using TimeMachine.

    All of which is to say, I do not think this is as big an issue as you seem to think it is, and personally, the compromise to be had in terms of user upgradability versus performance and security are worth it. User-upgradeable parts has never been Apple’s focus and it never will be as their entire philosophy has always been about making computers as simple and easy to use, that is, ‘transparent’ (speaking figuratively, and with one or two notable exceptions, literally), as any other device or appliance in the home. That is unlikely to change. Not everyone is as tech savvy as the people on fora such as this so if it’s a big deal for anyone, then it’s probably the case that Apple isn’t really the ecosystem for them. Only the Mac Pro really provides the scope for that, so it is a cost-prohibitive way to enter into that kind of hobby-enthusiast market, I reckon.
    edited February 2021 roundaboutnow
  • Reply 96 of 122
    darkvaderdarkvader Posts: 1,146member
    avon b7 said:
    No chin, at last!

    But I've had it with all-in-ones. I'll never buy a desktop Mac with the screen glued onto it again. 
    As a guy who built PCs for decades, I love my iMac AIOs. My last one lasted 8 years, by the time it was done even the screen was out of date. My new one is 10 lbs lighter and is VESA arm mounted, giving me an ultra clean desk free of any clutter or cables. 

    Never cared about the chin. Such complaints seem to be academic ones held by people not actually using the product. You’re in that category too, aren’t you?

    I have one client who HATES the chin.  Hates it so much that when she got an iMac with one, she refused to use it, put it on an employee's desk, and insisted I get her something else.  She's been using a Mac mini (with a really awful monitor) for a decade now.

    It's time for a replacement, but she thinks the iMac screens are all too big, so she'll probably end up with another mini and keep the same monitor.

    No one else has ever mentioned it. 
  • Reply 97 of 122
    PezaPeza Posts: 198member
    I’m actually excited to see what Apple do with these machines, how they perform and how much they charge for them.. may end up buying one even. Lots seem happy with the M1 MacBooks for the price.
  • Reply 98 of 122
    ITGUYINSD said:
    avon b7 said:
    No chin, at last!

    But I've had it with all-in-ones. I'll never buy a desktop Mac with the screen glued onto it again. 
    What Apple computer (desktop or portable) is serviceable/upgradeable except the $6000 Mac Pro?  I guess you aren't buying anything Apple!
    That’s the only Mac that interests me.
    elijahg
  • Reply 99 of 122
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 3,367member
    Lots of chatting about mini Mac Pros and expandable iMacs.  Have you all not seen the writing on the wall with the M1 Macs?  Everything forward, except for the current Mac Pro Tower, will be non-expandable and non-upgradable.  The M Chip controls everything on the board, and controls way too much.  Memory is now on the chip so you will never see a Mac with user-upgradable memory, except for the current Mac Pro.  The M chip, like the T2, has way too much control of the flash storage, which Apple will keep it soldered on all Macs going forward.  That is dangerous because if a chip fails on the board, your data is history.  Gone are the days of pulling a drive or SSD blade and recovering data for anything not yet backed up.  So we will be stuck paying the Apple Tax with excessive prices for memory and storage.
    The Mac Pro has T2 and removable storage, so clearly it can be done. 
    Also there is such a thing as external storage. 
  • Reply 100 of 122
    irelandireland Posts: 17,798member
    iMac should have front-firing awesome speaker system and wireless Qi charger in the foot. That would be an iMac I could get behind.
    elijahgdewme
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