HomePod is discontinued, but isn't dead yet - Apple's 'end of life' explained

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited March 15
There's been a lot of hate and discontent following Apple discontinuing the HomePod. Here's what that removal from sale practically means.

HomePod isn't
HomePod isn't "gone" quite yet, and you'll still have years of usage ahead if you get one now.


Apple made a shock announcement on March 13 that it was discontinuing the HomePod. The announcement advised Apple's original smart speaker will continue to be sold, including via its online store, but that there is only a limited supply available before stock runs out.

The news may panic some users who think their Apple device will have a limited lifespan and could stop working completely in the near future.

Just because Apple isn't producing any more HomePods and supplies will run out, it doesn't mean Apple will pull support straight away. The HomePod will continue to work properly for many years without issue.

If you read no further, understand this:

If you have an original HomePod, it isn't going to just stop working any time soon, because Apple has flipped a switch on its storefront. And, just because Apple isn't selling the original HomePod, that doesn't mean that your gear will spontaneously combust.

Discontinued, but not "End of Life"

Firstly, Apple is only discontinuing the original HomePod, and not declaring it to be either "End of Life," "Vintage," or "Obsolete." For all three terms, the effective meaning is the same: the device has reached the end of the product lifecycle.

A discontinued product does not immediately reach end of life, as hardware producers and vendors often have to support their products for some time after their sale. Instead, the actual end of life occurs years after the fact.

This concept not only applies to hardware, but to software as well. For example, Adobe announced a discontinuation of the Flash Player in 2017, and that it would end support completely with an EOL date of December 31, 2020.

Launched in September 2013, the iPhone 5C became obsolete in November 2020.
Launched in September 2013, the iPhone 5C became obsolete in November 2020.


As Apple explains on its support pages, owners of its products can obtain service and parts from Apple service providers for "5 years from when Apple last distributed the product for sale" at a minimum. In some cases where service or parts are required by law to be offered for a longer period, this can stretch the time to 7 years after its last sale.

Apple deems products it sold more between five and seven years ago as "Vintage" while those discontinued more than seven years ago are said to be "Obsolete."

Apple doesn't offer hardware service for obsolete products "with no exceptions." This includes preventing service partners from being able to order parts for obsolete products.

For that two-year "Vintage" period, there's a chance you will be able to get support, but not necessarily.

While Apple keeps a list of products it deems to be "Vintage" or "Obsolete," it is unknown exactly when Apple will add the HomePod to the list. As the HomePod is still actively sold by Apple, the five-year and seven-year timers haven't started, and they won't until Apple ceases sale.

Even when Apple stops selling and the countdown to a "Vintage" designation begins, HomePod owners will still have support for their hardware.

What happens to HomePod in the short term?

Nothing happens to the HomePod that you own in the short term. Not a single thing. If you want to buy one at retail, though, don't count on sale pricing.

Despite the discontinuation of the product, owners of existing HomePods and those buying the last stocks will continue to have the same support level as normal. There are no changes to warranties or their statutory rights as a consumer in relation to Apple.

But how do you know?

Apple has a policy of providing software updates to products it discontinues, which will ensure the product continues to function normally with other items in its product line. This typically includes performance improvements as well as security patches, among other changes.

Features intended for the HomePod mini may still be added to the HomePod for a few more years.
Features intended for the HomePod mini may still be added to the HomePod for a few more years.


However, the software updates don't necessarily add support for new features to the HomePod that will be introduced in the continuing HomePod mini line. Some new features will be shared across both models in early software updates due to their similarity, but later updates are unlikely to include such support.

In short, you will continue to have the same consumer support for the HomePod and beyond its warranty period until it becomes obsolete. Though even as an obsolete product, it will still be usable.

Active into obsolescence

As it shares the same core functionality as the HomePod mini, many of the basic functions of the HomePod will continue to work long after it is deemed obsolete. Shared features, like Siri queries and music streaming, will stick around so long as Apple maintains the software on the HomePod.

Since it takes considerable resources to change how core features, like Siri or Apple Music, functions across Apple's entire ecosystem, it would take a major technology restructuring effort to kill off that functionality.

That is, in theory. In reality, various features will eventually stop working once the HomePod is obsolete at some point.

Even so, there will still be some utility in the HomePod for some time to come.

Even if Siri stops working, you'll still be able to use a HomePod for AirPlay
Even if Siri stops working, you'll still be able to use a HomePod for AirPlay


The support for AirPlay and AirPlay 2 means the HomePod will continue to be a target speaker for streaming audio, even if all of the speaker's other major features stop working. Even if Apple stops providing software updates to the HomePod for a considerable length of time, that AirPlay support will still remain active and available.

It may not remain a "smart" speaker far down the line, but it will still be usable as a speaker.

The HomePod is not a dairy product with a shelf-life

Apple tends to ensure its devices work for as long as reasonably possible, supported both by its high-quality hardware production and extensive software support.

Despite being obsolete and not sold for well over a decade, owners of the original iPod can still use the portable music device with any Mac to synchronize music tracks.

In some instances, Apple ignores its own rules and provides software updates for devices that are obsolete.

Take the example of AirPort, Apple's line of routers and networking equipment that has been discontinued for quite some time, and with many models listed as obsolete. Apple has continued to support the now-unavailable product line with a number of security fixes, including for the obsolete models.

In August 2018, Apple even introduced AirPlay 2 support to the 802.11n AirPort Express base stations, enabling it to function properly with Apple's updated media-streaming protocol. And, that update was to a product line that existed as either vintage or obsolete at that time.

It is not unreasonable to expect the HomePod to benefit from software updates after it gains the Obsolete identifier.

AirPort routers are no longer sold by Apple, but still receive regular updates.
AirPort routers are no longer sold by Apple, but still receive regular updates.


New technologies Apple uses in its products generally include backward compatibility, ensuring it will work with older hardware in some way, if not necessarily optimally.

For example, Thunderbolt 3 devices will work with Thunderbolt 2, and since Thunderbolt 2 supports Thunderbolt 1, there's backward compatibility there as well. USB is similar in that USB 3-supporting hardware will work with USB 2 connections and earlier incarnations, albeit at slower speeds.

At its most extreme, it is possible to connect a first-generation iPod to a Mac running macOS Catalina, using a Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 adapter, then a Thunderbolt 2 to FireWire adapter. Even with the disparity in software age and technologies in use, that iPod will still sync properly.

Even at the point the HomePod becomes obsolete, it will be usable in some fashion by owners. And, that day of obsolescence is many years away.
jahblade
«134

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 68
    robin huberrobin huber Posts: 3,428member
    Perhaps some third party will eventually offer a wired connection kit that will allow it to be a “dumb” speaker indefinitely regardless of changes to wireless technology. 
    anantksundaramcaladanianGeorgeBMacjahbladewatto_cobracgWerks
  • Reply 2 of 68
    I think there is an easy explanation here. It was rumored last summer (Google “Andrew Left predicts Apple acquisition Sono)”, Apple killing the HomePod means this will happen soon. Why support a high-end speaker solution that isn’t selling well when Sonos will provide that product via acquisition?

    Sono has a market cap of 5 billion. That’s pocket change for Apple. 
    silvertidepatchythepiratecaladanianjahbladen2itivguy
  • Reply 3 of 68
    Kinda reassuring in a milquetoast sort of way... but still, not the same outlook as when it was released 3 years ago, let alone only last week. You can’t expect people who have spent (slightly over the odds) hard-earned on a homepod setup to be overjoyed....
    anantksundaramjahbladewatto_cobran2itivguy
  • Reply 4 of 68
    iMaKiMaK Posts: 9member
    It’s common sense in the Apple world that all their products have an 8 year support life to them. Then they become “legacy” products. I can’t recall if that was the term they use, but there is a very specific term that use for products past the 8 year mark. They don’t use the word “obsolete” or any of that crap. 

    Of course, Apple makes exceptions all the time and they will sprinkle updates and patches for products way past the 8 year mark when they feel it’s necessary. 

    But as far has mainstream, standard support, 8 years is the number. 

    It wouldn’t be hard to develop a constantly supported AirPlay repeater hub that would connect to the HomePod constantly, and repeat the signal through the most recent AirPlay protocol, Bluetooth, and/or wire connection.

    It’s the same principle as making a non-smart TV by connecting an Apple TV to it and air playing content to it. Just like how YouTube doesn’t support the old Apple TV’s anymore, it still acts a bride to AirPlay YouTube videos to. 

    It blows my mind how they discontinued the HomePod. Yes it was 300 dollars, but it was a great sounding speaker. My AirPod Pros are nearly the same price, but don’t come anywhere near the HomePod. It’s odd how the AirPod Pros are selling like hotcakes, but god forbid you spend 50 dollars more for a speaker than rocks the room??
    My magic iPad keyboard was 50 dollars more than the HomePod too, and those are selling just fine. 
    I’m just confused here how the HomePod can be a failure while it’s more expensive, less competent family members are doing just fine. 

    Not to mention, the HomePod Mini cannot fill the missing hole that the HomePod has left. the whole purpose of HomePod was to be able to drop the thing wherever you wanted to, and it would sound great.
    the HomePod mini does not do that. It’s just a speaker made by Apple. What entices someone to buy it over any other speaker out there? 
    I like the HomeKit integration and all, but the spacial recognition of the HomePod was the key selling point. 

    The only solution for the HomePod mini is that it must require the U1 chip, so it can sense how far it is from another HomePod mini, adjusting the sound accordingly. 
     But you would need to buy like 8 of the Minis to replicate what the 1 HomePod could do. That’s 8 wires and 8 outlet sockets taken up. Stupid.

    I’d rather buy 2 homepods for 600 dollars to get a nice system going. 
    silvertideJWSCdavenionicleAlex1Ndbvaporjahbladewatto_cobrastevedownunderelijahg
  • Reply 5 of 68
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 874member
    This article misses the boat a bit because most of us know that Apple will not discontinue support for the HomePod anytime soon.  What is disconcerting is Apple’s decision to cancel it does leave one with the impression that Apple is rudderless with regard to product development and support.  Apple does not appear to have a “product champion” assigned as an owner to each of their products.  That’s bad news when the VP of hardware engineer in clearly has his eye elsewhere.
    edited March 15 avon b7lkruppentropysAlex1Nbala1234caladanianwilliamlondonGeorgeBMacelijahgwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 68
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 1,028member
    I think there is an easy explanation here. It was rumored last summer (Google “Andrew Left predicts Apple acquisition Sono)”, Apple killing the HomePod means this will happen soon. Why support a high-end speaker solution that isn’t selling well when Sonos will provide that product via acquisition?

    Sono has a market cap of 5 billion. That’s pocket change for Apple. 
    I would love this so much. Selfishly. I own a house full of Sonos gear. And I worry that the Sonos app, that so beautifully allows mixing & matching any/all streaming services & local media into playlists & search, would lose its streaming's service neutrality. If the Sonos app were stripped of that, it would kill a big part of Sonos’ appeal to me. There is reason to be optimistic, with the threat of antitrust litigation, Apple buying Sonos and using their service agnostic app might be a turnkey disarmament solution to antitrust complaints about Apple Music streaming. 
    edited March 15 jahblade
  • Reply 7 of 68
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 1,028member

    iMaK said:
    It’s common sense in the Apple world that all their products have an 8 year support life to them. Then they become “legacy” products. I can’t recall if that was the term they use, but there is a very specific term that use for products past the 8 year mark. They don’t use the word “obsolete” or any of that crap.


    https://www.google.com/search?q=apple+obsolete&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en-us&client=safari
    elijahg
  • Reply 8 of 68
    MplsPMplsP Posts: 2,895member
    I'm not sure what the concern is over support. Apple continues to make the HomePod mini and continues to support Siri and HomeKit, so the only real question is how long software updates are going to be available, but those are of marginal importance for something like the HomePod. 

    I also find it interesting how people argue a device isn't obsolete just because it isn't being manufactured any more, yet they argue that USB A and the 3.5mm headphone jack are obsolete despite the fact that they are still bing produced. There's a bit of logical inconsistency going on here...
    DAalsethkiltedgreenAlex1NGeorgeBMacelijahgcgWerkslarrya
  • Reply 9 of 68
    I was a bit gutted.

    I have a pair of QUAD ESL-63s that still work superbly after buying them in 1987. Heck, QUAD’s original ESL, introduced in 1957 is still regarded by some as one of the finest speakers in the world. So four years?

    Due to space concerns now, my ESLs and big chunky power amps are total overkill and/or I don’t have the space. The HomePods seemed a viable alternative, taking up minimal space and sounding pretty good for the size (too much bass though). I knew that being a processor, WiFi type of software/hardware thing it was at risk of the usual fate of computer products. But 4 years was a lot shorter than I expected!

    What happens when AirPlay 3 is the thing and HomePods are stuck on V2 with no update path? That’s my concern. Time will tell.
    Alex1NGeorgeBMacelijahgwatto_cobracgWerks
  • Reply 10 of 68
    technotechno Posts: 728member
    JWSC said:
    This article misses the boat a bit because most of us know that Apple will not discontinue support for the HomePod anytime soon.  What is disconcerting is Apple’s decision to cancel it does leave one with the impression that Apple is rudderless with regard to product development and support.  Apple does not appear to have a “product champion” assigned as an owner to each of their products.  That’s bad news when the VP of hardware engineer in clearly has his eye elsewhere.
    Exactly! Apple has a history of not following through on things like this. They start something and then put little to no effort into marketing it or developing it. As a customer, I am losing faith in their commitment to the products as opposed to the services revenue streams. The next cool thing Apple develops, I am going to stop myself from hopping aboard and ask myself "Will Apple give up on this in a few years?"

    That kind of mistrust does not bode well for buying an Apple Car. Why in the hell would I EVER consider buying a car from a company I think my abandon it in 5 years? I wouldn't!
    JWSCsilvertideentropysp-dogAlex1NanantksundaramdbvaporwilliamlondonGeorgeBMacelijahg
  • Reply 11 of 68
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 1,028member
    If Apple follows the category leader in smart speakers (at least as far as longevity and building a real business of marketing 100% smart audio components) they will offer unusually long software support for AirPods as compared with their other products.

    Not to say they WILL follow Sonos' precedent in long-term software support, but Sonos track record of running a real business in this category suggests they will at least consider the policies of Sonos before diverging from them. Everyone else in the category that I can think of is either a small product line under a diversified consumer brand or a much more niche player, often audiophile-focused. The Alexas & Google speakers seem to be points of entry into the profit centers of Amazon & Google, not a core line of profitable product and these companies seem to feel little concern for discontinuing models or services in these product lines. The electronics brands' products (Heos, Bose) seem more customer-focused, but without the benefit of continuously delivering customers (read: private information) to other profit centers of the business, you have to wonder how long until the manufacturers lose interest and move on. The audiophile-grade devices operate on a different model entirely, and I think it is safe to exclude them from consideration—no major brands are running a business like Bang & Olufsen or McIntosh and I doubt Apple has any interest, either.
    edited March 15 Alex1N
  • Reply 12 of 68
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,106member
    JWSC said:
    This article misses the boat a bit because most of us know that Apple will not discontinue support for the HomePod anytime soon.  What is disconcerting is Apple’s decision to cancel it does leave one with the impression that Apple is rudderless with regard to product development and support.  Apple does not appear to have a “product champion” assigned as an owner to each of their products.  That’s bad news when the VP of hardware engineer in clearly has his eye elsewhere.
    No, it doesn't suggest that. It was around for 4 years. They decided to end it. I wish they hadn't, but it's not some sort of handwaving indictor of woe within Apple. Apple canceled products under Jobs as well. Just the result of internal discussion.
    edited March 15 roundaboutnowAlex1Nwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 68
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,450member
    JWSC said:
    This article misses the boat a bit because most of us know that Apple will not discontinue support for the HomePod anytime soon.  What is disconcerting is Apple’s decision to cancel it does leave one with the impression that Apple is rudderless with regard to product development and support.  Apple does not appear to have a “product champion” assigned as an owner to each of their products.  That’s bad news when the VP of hardware engineer in clearly has his eye elsewhere.
    Rudderless? Quite the contrary. Unless ‘one’ in this case means - one person. Sorry, but Apple has recently taken as bold and as decisive of a hard turn to starboard that is possible, a hard turn that will decide their fate for at least the next decade and beyond with the release of the first generation of Apple Silicon Macintosh computers. They have essentially severed the relationship that has provided sustainment for the commodity personal computer market for the past 35 plus years, i.e., Mother Intel always there feeding new silicon for system builders to hang their futures on. For most system builders that was and will always be “good enough.” But it wasn’t good enough for Apple and they slammed the rudder over like few other companies in a similar position would ever dare to consider.

    Discontinuing the large form factor HomePod simply reminds us that Apple is no different than any other company in recognizing that they have finite resources, finite bandwidth, and must always focus and always be very deliberate about everything they say “yes” to. I think we sometimes think that Apple has infinite everything and can sustain everything they’ve started because they have so much financial capital. But financial capital isn’t an impediment for Apple. Human capital certainly is, as is getting sufficient mindshare, and therefore influence, within the company all the way up to the board. 

    Apple’s greatest challenge is the same as every other successful innovator, making sure they go after the right things with the resources they have at their disposal. Every “product champion,” whether for existing products or for new products in the pipeline, has to fight for survival and compete for resources and mindshare/influence. Not every product makes the cut, plain and simple. Everyone’s keeping score on the execution, bottom line results, and trends sides of things - all of the time. That’s what defines how much and how quickly to turn the rudder, in a very deliberate, very decisive, very informed way, all the while maintaining a focus on the big picture course established by Apple’s team of strategists. Apple never takes their hand off the rudder.


    davenapplesnorangesroundaboutnowAlex1NRayz2016williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 68
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 874member
    JWSC said:
    This article misses the boat a bit because most of us know that Apple will not discontinue support for the HomePod anytime soon.  What is disconcerting is Apple’s decision to cancel it does leave one with the impression that Apple is rudderless with regard to product development and support.  Apple does not appear to have a “product champion” assigned as an owner to each of their products.  That’s bad news when the VP of hardware engineer in clearly has his eye elsewhere.
    No, it doesn't suggest that. It was around for 4 years. They decided to end it. I wish they hadn't, but it's not some sort of handwaving indictor of woe within Apple. Apple canceled products under Jobs as well. Just the result of internal discussion.
    You are making my point for me. The HomePod was around for four years and they did nothing with it during that time.  They let it languish just as they did with the trashcan MacPro and the beloved (sarcasm) Apple TV remote.  That should’ve never happened.
    entropysanantksundaramcaladanianwilliamlondonGeorgeBMacelijahglarryan2itivguy
  • Reply 15 of 68
    JWSCJWSC Posts: 874member
    dewme said:
    JWSC said:
    This article misses the boat a bit because most of us know that Apple will not discontinue support for the HomePod anytime soon.  What is disconcerting is Apple’s decision to cancel it does leave one with the impression that Apple is rudderless with regard to product development and support.  Apple does not appear to have a “product champion” assigned as an owner to each of their products.  That’s bad news when the VP of hardware engineer in clearly has his eye elsewhere.
    Rudderless? Quite the contrary. Unless ‘one’ in this case means - one person. Sorry, but Apple has recently taken as bold and as decisive of a hard turn to starboard that is possible, a hard turn that will decide their fate for at least the next decade and beyond with the release of the first generation of Apple Silicon Macintosh computers. They have essentially severed the relationship that has provided sustainment for the commodity personal computer market for the past 35 plus years, i.e., Mother Intel always there feeding new silicon for system builders to hang their futures on. For most system builders that was and will always be “good enough.” But it wasn’t good enough for Apple and they slammed the rudder over like few other companies in a similar position would ever dare to consider.

    Discontinuing the large form factor HomePod simply reminds us that Apple is no different than any other company in recognizing that they have finite resources, finite bandwidth, and must always focus and always be very deliberate about everything they say “yes” to. I think we sometimes think that Apple has infinite everything and can sustain everything they’ve started because they have so much financial capital. But financial capital isn’t an impediment for Apple. Human capital certainly is, as is getting sufficient mindshare, and therefore influence, within the company all the way up to the board. 

    Apple’s greatest challenge is the same as every other successful innovator, making sure they go after the right things with the resources they have at their disposal. Every “product champion,” whether for existing products or for new products in the pipeline, has to fight for survival and compete for resources and mindshare/influence. Not every product makes the cut, plain and simple. Everyone’s keeping score on the execution, bottom line results, and trends sides of things - all of the time. That’s what defines how much and how quickly to turn the rudder, in a very deliberate, very decisive, very informed way, all the while maintaining a focus on the big picture course established by Apple’s team of strategists. Apple never takes their hand off the rudder.
    Hey, I think Apple Silicon is wonderful too.  Without a doubt it is the biggest thing Apple has done since the iPhone.  And it’s clear they are laser focused on it.

    It is also clear that they have a habit of neglecting other key products.  A company the size of Apple should have ample resources to devote to all the product spaces that they choose to be in.   Yet Apple does not appear to have a strategy or roadmap of what product spaces they want to be in 5-10 years down the road.  Like many others, I find this to be a deeply troubling sign of rudderless and sclerotic management.

    Does Apple want to be in the home audio space or do they not?  One would have thought that decision would have been made long ago.  If the answer is “yes” then I would expect them to stick with it to tweak, rework, re-design struggling products to achieve success overtime.  The HomePod mini, as nice as it is, doesn’t inspire confidence, especially if it’s going to rely on Siri.  Speaking of which, when the hell are they going to fix Siri?
    edited March 15 entropysAlex1Nmuthuk_vanalingamelijahglarrya
  • Reply 16 of 68
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 5,609member
    JWSC said:
    This article misses the boat a bit because most of us know that Apple will not discontinue support for the HomePod anytime soon.  What is disconcerting is Apple’s decision to cancel it does leave one with the impression that Apple is rudderless with regard to product development and support.  Apple does not appear to have a “product champion” assigned as an owner to each of their products.  That’s bad news when the VP of hardware engineer in clearly has his eye elsewhere.
    I think that's basically correct but for me it's a simple question of 'commitment' and that is one of Apple's biggest failures (especially in software). 

    If you put years into designing a product you should stick with it even if the market does not respond as enthusiastically as you had hoped for initially. 

    There's a lot I don't particularly like about the initial design, but size and wattage aren't among them. A version 2.0 could quite easily vastly improve on those limitations and provide for an altogether more versatile product. There is little doubt in my mind that a retail price drop would also be welcome. 

    The AP Mini obviously has its place too and that was pointed out when the original HP was presented. The HP should have become a bigger version of the Mini and lived on IMO. 

    I feel this product was let go too early and not really given an opportunity to reach its true potential. 

    Acquiring Sonos would be more akin to taking a competitor off the market IMO than seeking growth for the Sonos product line itself and there is absolutely nothing (on paper) that Sonos does that Apple can't do. 

    The HP should have been able to play, direct and seamlessly, from anything the user pointed at it wirelessly (Wifi or Bluetooth). 

    Broad codec support and good antenna design. 

    Less obstacles and more convergence with industry standards and, yes, that would include allowing users to choose their assistants of choice. Less lock-in and more interoperability all round. 

    I imagine that at some point (when assistants finally reach the capacity of what we see today in science fiction) investigations will begin, in an effort to enhance competition and give consumers choice. 

    If Apple were strapped for cash I would understand a change in product direction but the HP is really just part of a bigger system where both it and the Mini could do well. 

    If, at the end of the day, the decision was more a question of economics than forward thinking, I feel it will have been a mistake. 



     

    JWSCp-dogAlex1Nmuthuk_vanalingamelijahg
  • Reply 17 of 68
    entropysentropys Posts: 2,844member
    JWSC and Avon seem to be correct. 
    Spend a lot of time developing a product, then release with massive fanfare and an extraordinary price and other limitations that is not well received in the market.
    so instead of correcting and fine tuning to fix the market problems, nothing.  Languishment. Another potentially great product dies from neglect because someone got egg on their face.

    Unfortunately it isn’t like the naughty kid sent to the attic and forgotten while the rest of the family fly to Paris for Christmas.
    JWSCp-dogAlex1Nanantksundaramcaladanianwilliamlondonelijahg
  • Reply 18 of 68
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,094administrator
    entropys said:
    JWSC and Avon seem to be correct. 
    Spend a lot of time developing a product, then release with massive fanfare and an extraordinary price and other limitations that is not well received in the market.
    so instead of correcting and fine tuning to fix the market problems, nothing.  Languishment. Another potentially great product dies from neglect because someone got egg on their face.

    Unfortunately it isn’t like the naughty kid sent to the attic and forgotten while the rest of the family fly to Paris for Christmas.
    They did correct and fine-tune, the same way they did the iPhone. The original iPhone isn't still on the market, it's been replaced by other, newer iPhones in different form-factors.

    They released the HomePod mini for that iteration.
    Alex1Nwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 68
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,094administrator

    JWSC said:
    This article misses the boat a bit because most of us know that Apple will not discontinue support for the HomePod anytime soon.  What is disconcerting is Apple’s decision to cancel it does leave one with the impression that Apple is rudderless with regard to product development and support.  Apple does not appear to have a “product champion” assigned as an owner to each of their products.  That’s bad news when the VP of hardware engineer in clearly has his eye elsewhere.
    Most of the AI forum goers know, yes. But, AI is for everybody, with varying levels of knowledge. Our emails were bonkers this weekend.

    The HomePod ecosystem isn't dead. It evolved into the HomePod mini, like Apple said.
    edited March 15 Alex1Nfirelockwilliamlondonjahbladewatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 68
    thrangthrang Posts: 866member
    The issue with the HomePod wasn't the HomePod itself (though perhaps A8 was long in tooth), but the poor performance of Siri. At $349/299, your assistant better be the bee's knees...

    The HomePod sounds incredible, and a stereo pair is amazingly engaging for the size.

    At $99, you may get a little more slack.

    My concern is that this was part of a home invasion strategy that now seems less defined, less robust.

    However, if this is the precursor of a HP2, perhaps with mesh networking capabilities, or of Apple buying Sonos (I initially discounted this rumor, but the Sonos name, and the development and product already done completed (with Airplay 2), especially for sounders and 5.1 setups), it might be worth it for Apple. I own several HomePods as well as four zones of Sonos Amps/ HT setup)

    Was Beats "worth" $3bn though? There is a lot less buzz arounds Beats lately it seems...


    edited March 15 JWSCAlex1Nwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
Sign In or Register to comment.