iPhone 11 Pro with misprinted Apple logo sold for $2,700

Posted:
in iPhone
An alleged "misprint" iPhone 11 Pro that was apparently sold for $2,700 has surfaced in a tweet, with images showing the Apple logo on the back of the iPhone wasn't positioned correctly.




Posted to Twitter on Friday by "Internal Archive," the images depict the back of an iPhone 11 Pro from two viewpoints, with one angled upwards from the base while the other is a flat top-down view. The second image is shown alongside an edited version to highlight the "misprint."

The defect is in the positioning and the angle of the Apple logo, which usually sits in the center of the back panel. In this case, the logo is off-center to the right, as well as slightly angled anticlockwise. If genuine, it's feasible this was a manufacturing error where the panel wasn't seated properly in a machine before the logo was applied to the device.

A misprint iPhone 11 Pro that sold for 2700$. This misprint is extremely rare- I'd say 1 in 100 million or possibly even rarer. pic.twitter.com/68F7giZAbm

-- Internal Archive (@ArchiveInternal)


While there's usually some form of evidence accompanying such images to convince viewers they are real, there is very little extra information provided by the Twitter account. Estimating it to be an "extremely rare" misprint at a "1 in 100 million" chance of happening, it is further claimed the device managed to get through Apple's rigorous quality assurance processes and actually shipped to a customer.

It is unclear when and how the misprinted iPhone was sold for $2,700.

While the account is relatively unknown and not highly followed, it seems plausible that the images could be genuine. The anonymous account has repeatedly posted images of prototype devices in the past, and though extremely rare, mistakes do occasionally slip through into consumer hands.

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 8
    A fool and their money are soon parted.

    The other fool who sold it could have easily found a bigger fool who would have forked over $10k.
    watto_cobrarepressthis
  • Reply 2 of 8
    KuyangkohKuyangkoh Posts: 640member
    tommikele said:
    A fool and their money are soon parted.

    The other fool who sold it could have easily found a bigger fool who would have forked over $10k.
    HACHOOOO
  • Reply 3 of 8
    crowleycrowley Posts: 7,639member
    I wonder if anyone will pay top dollar for my iPhone X with a dodgy power button.  It's pretty rare.
    tokyojimupulseimages
  • Reply 4 of 8
    Uh....my iPhone 12 Pro, the Logo does not look really center as well......so this also worth twice what I paid (I doubt it)?
  • Reply 5 of 8
    crowley said:
    I wonder if anyone will pay top dollar for my iPhone X with a dodgy power button.  It's pretty rare.
    Has the iPhone build quality dropped? 
  • Reply 6 of 8
    I have an iMac G4 with misaligned silk screening, so the rear ports have the wrong icons over them.  I wonder if that's worth anything?  :-)
  • Reply 7 of 8
    Why is this news?
    An iPhone with an imperfection makes it out of the factory and some schmuck pays $2700 for it? 
    While you’re at it sell them a gold Apple Watch. 
  • Reply 8 of 8
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,533member
    This is not an unusual phenomenon at all, at least in the world of collecting. Anything that's supposedly manufactured to exacting standards, for example a coin from the US mint that's manufactured in the millions, will sometimes have defective instances, those which should not pass through the QA process or leak out through normal distribution channels and make it into the wild. Once a collector, or someone who caters to selling "rare" items to collectors, gets wind of a "rare and unusual" visual defect existing in the wild, its price does tend to go up substantially. This is largely driven by speculation that somebody at some point in the future will develop a yearning for the "rare" item and lay down serious cash to own it.  

    Collectors are strange animals with strange brain function. Or at least "strange" to non-collectors. You should not even try to rationalize why they do what they do or how much they are willing to spend on an object of their desire. The intrinsic value of the item matters not at all. The only thing that matters is that at least one person is willing to pay whatever it takes to acquire the item.

    Visited EBay recently? If the answer is yes, then you're probably wondering why the seller ONLY got $2700 for this unusual iPhone. 
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