Apple debuts colorful 24-inch iMac with M1, upgraded camera and audio

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Comments

  • Reply 261 of 283
    ^ That’s a reply to the earlier post by “Titantiger”.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 262 of 283
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,115member
    What. The heck. 

    Not even the iPad has such a trashy solution. 

    Hey I get not including the PSU in the body in order to minimize internal heat and save space. 

    But at least allow the thing to elegantly plug into the wall directly. Not just plop on the freaking floor. Baffling. 

    Either redesign the brick to be a plug. 
    For the love of Steve! NO! 

    Wall warts are the single worst scourge of any studio environment — or ANY environment that requires more than three things to be plugged into power. 

    There is NEVER enough space on a power strip to plug in all the wall warts you need to, or their sheer weight and bulk means they fall out or make the power strip unmanageable (just had to wire up six external hard drives, ALL of which had those fucking abominations). 

    They're also rarely grounded, which is an absolute no-go when working with any kind of electrically sensitive attached equipment. 

    Line lumps are crap, too, but they are FAR preferable. 

    I mean, obviously just plugging a grounded cable into a device is by far the preferable option, but if that isn't possible for whatever reason… f*ck wall warts.
    watto_cobraDetnatordocno42
  • Reply 263 of 283
    Just because the power supply is magnetic, does not mean it can be easily detached. All I can find on Apple’s page about the new iMac is the power supply is easily attached. Did the keynote say the power supply is mag safe, or to prevent the computer from crashing down? Again the area of the magnet is larger and thus should be harder to detach. There is nothing on Apple’s webpages that there is a battery meant to prevent power loss. They could have enough capacitors to prevent power loss for a brief period. Apple doesn’t detail what the advantage of the magnet attachment is, other than easily attached. The magnet could simply be to ensure proper alignment. 
    A magnet that is strong enough to have the same (or greater) pull out force of a conventional power receptacle is straightforward enough, so maybe this is what's in place.

    Most power cord receptacles have some depth to have the surface area to provide a spring loaded friction fit or for a threaded connector to keep it in place. Having Ethernet in that cord complicates things, so a custom connector had to be developed. I think the advantage of the magnetic power cord is that it allows secure attachment to the thin structure of the iMac with a shallow receptacle that does not require the length for threads or friction. (I suppose a protruding receptacle on the back of the iMac could work, but the lever arm of such a thing could make it easier to crack the mounting plate or even break off). 
    watto_cobraDetnatordocno42
  • Reply 264 of 283
    Just because the power supply is magnetic, does not mean it can be easily detached. All I can find on Apple’s page about the new iMac is the power supply is easily attached. Did the keynote say the power supply is mag safe, or to prevent the computer from crashing down? Again the area of the magnet is larger and thus should be harder to detach. There is nothing on Apple’s webpages that there is a battery meant to prevent power loss. They could have enough capacitors to prevent power loss for a brief period. Apple doesn’t detail what the advantage of the magnet attachment is, other than easily attached. The magnet could simply be to ensure proper alignment. 
    And that's a fair assessment. Guess we'll find out. I still wonder what the advantage is if it's not for easy detachment. If it's a cable meant to stay strongly connected, then easy and efficient alignment isn't a problem that needed fixing. There was never an alignment issue and the power cable isn't something that you need to connect and disconnect frequently on an iMac, so what's the real advantage? It would then be a matter of over-engineering.

    But we will see when it's available in person.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 265 of 283

    Just because the power supply is magnetic, does not mean it can be easily detached. All I can find on Apple’s page about the new iMac is the power supply is easily attached. Did the keynote say the power supply is mag safe, or to prevent the computer from crashing down? Again the area of the magnet is larger and thus should be harder to detach. There is nothing on Apple’s webpages that there is a battery meant to prevent power loss. They could have enough capacitors to prevent power loss for a brief period. Apple doesn’t detail what the advantage of the magnet attachment is, other than easily attached. The magnet could simply be to ensure proper alignment. 
    This! People seem to be overlooking the fact that magnets differing levels of magnetic force to the extent that they can be impossible to separate by hand. The XDR display uses magnets to hold the display to the stand and you don’t see stories of people or pets accidentally bumping them lose.  People are assuming it will be like MagSafe which was designed to easily detach rather than something more appropriate for a desktop. It’s a totally misguided assumption. Apple can easily design something that offers the same level of secure for as the  previous solution. 
    So then, what is the advantage over the normal plug? Why did it need a redesign? My iMac power cable just stays connected.

    The fact Apple implemented this feature does beg the question of "what problem does this solve?". 
  • Reply 266 of 283
    Just because the power supply is magnetic, does not mean it can be easily detached. All I can find on Apple’s page about the new iMac is the power supply is easily attached. Did the keynote say the power supply is mag safe, or to prevent the computer from crashing down? Again the area of the magnet is larger and thus should be harder to detach. There is nothing on Apple’s webpages that there is a battery meant to prevent power loss. They could have enough capacitors to prevent power loss for a brief period. Apple doesn’t detail what the advantage of the magnet attachment is, other than easily attached. The magnet could simply be to ensure proper alignment. 
    A magnet that is strong enough to have the same (or greater) pull out force of a conventional power receptacle is straightforward enough, so maybe this is what's in place.

    Most power cord receptacles have some depth to have the surface area to provide a spring loaded friction fit or for a threaded connector to keep it in place. Having Ethernet in that cord complicates things, so a custom connector had to be developed. I think the advantage of the magnetic power cord is that it allows secure attachment to the thin structure of the iMac with a shallow receptacle that does not require the length for threads or friction. (I suppose a protruding receptacle on the back of the iMac could work, but the lever arm of such a thing could make it easier to crack the mounting plate or even break off). 
    Good point about the ethernet connection, which is one thing I thought might have prompted the redesign. Otherwise, if it's not meant for easy detachment, it feels like a bit of over-engineering.
  • Reply 267 of 283
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,115member

    Just because the power supply is magnetic, does not mean it can be easily detached. All I can find on Apple’s page about the new iMac is the power supply is easily attached. Did the keynote say the power supply is mag safe, or to prevent the computer from crashing down? Again the area of the magnet is larger and thus should be harder to detach. There is nothing on Apple’s webpages that there is a battery meant to prevent power loss. They could have enough capacitors to prevent power loss for a brief period. Apple doesn’t detail what the advantage of the magnet attachment is, other than easily attached. The magnet could simply be to ensure proper alignment. 
    This! People seem to be overlooking the fact that magnets differing levels of magnetic force to the extent that they can be impossible to separate by hand. The XDR display uses magnets to hold the display to the stand and you don’t see stories of people or pets accidentally bumping them lose.  People are assuming it will be like MagSafe which was designed to easily detach rather than something more appropriate for a desktop. It’s a totally misguided assumption. Apple can easily design something that offers the same level of secure for as the  previous solution. 
    So then, what is the advantage over the normal plug? Why did it need a redesign? My iMac power cable just stays connected.

    The fact Apple implemented this feature does beg the question of "what problem does this solve?". 
    How deep is the power socket on the back of your iMac?

    The new iMac is just shy of 12 mm thick. 

    I’m sure you can figure out one of the problems. 
    watto_cobraDetnatordocno42
  • Reply 268 of 283
    spheric said:

    Just because the power supply is magnetic, does not mean it can be easily detached. All I can find on Apple’s page about the new iMac is the power supply is easily attached. Did the keynote say the power supply is mag safe, or to prevent the computer from crashing down? Again the area of the magnet is larger and thus should be harder to detach. There is nothing on Apple’s webpages that there is a battery meant to prevent power loss. They could have enough capacitors to prevent power loss for a brief period. Apple doesn’t detail what the advantage of the magnet attachment is, other than easily attached. The magnet could simply be to ensure proper alignment. 
    This! People seem to be overlooking the fact that magnets differing levels of magnetic force to the extent that they can be impossible to separate by hand. The XDR display uses magnets to hold the display to the stand and you don’t see stories of people or pets accidentally bumping them lose.  People are assuming it will be like MagSafe which was designed to easily detach rather than something more appropriate for a desktop. It’s a totally misguided assumption. Apple can easily design something that offers the same level of secure for as the  previous solution. 
    So then, what is the advantage over the normal plug? Why did it need a redesign? My iMac power cable just stays connected.

    The fact Apple implemented this feature does beg the question of "what problem does this solve?". 
    How deep is the power socket on the back of your iMac?

    The new iMac is just shy of 12 mm thick. 

    I’m sure you can figure out one of the problems. 
    Yep, that was the point that the smart guy on #263 was bringing up.  ;)
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 269 of 283
    pigybankpigybank Posts: 178member
    Update:  the website I read the below information on was incorrect.  The max is 2TB which is great. 

    Maximum internal storage of 512 GB?   That’s a huge step backward, not forward.  Cloud storage is slow and requires a constant internet connection to access files and media.  This computer isn’t for me, glad I got my 27” iMac when I did. 
    edited April 2021 watto_cobra
  • Reply 270 of 283
    thttht Posts: 4,196member
    pigybank said:
    Maximum internal storage of 512 GB?   That’s a huge step backward, not forward.  Cloud storage is slow and requires a constant internet connection to access files and media.  This computer isn’t for me, glad I got my 27” iMac when I did. 
    The 2021 iMac can be configured with 256, 512, 1024 and 2048 GB of storage, So, 2 TB is the maximum internal storage.

    Based on the M1 Macs so far, if you are optioning up from 512 GB to 2 TB storage, that will cost +$600.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 271 of 283
    pigybankpigybank Posts: 178member
    tht said:
    pigybank said:
    Maximum internal storage of 512 GB?   That’s a huge step backward, not forward.  Cloud storage is slow and requires a constant internet connection to access files and media.  This computer isn’t for me, glad I got my 27” iMac when I did. 
    The 2021 iMac can be configured with 256, 512, 1024 and 2048 GB of storage, So, 2 TB is the maximum internal storage.

    Based on the M1 Macs so far, if you are optioning up from 512 GB to 2 TB storage, that will cost +$600.
    I could not find the specs on Apple.  When I googled 2 websites said it Maxes out at 512.  If you’re correct then that is great news.  I was really confused since they state the new iPad has 2 TB of storage. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 272 of 283
    thttht Posts: 4,196member
    pigybank said:
    tht said:
    pigybank said:
    Maximum internal storage of 512 GB?   That’s a huge step backward, not forward.  Cloud storage is slow and requires a constant internet connection to access files and media.  This computer isn’t for me, glad I got my 27” iMac when I did. 
    The 2021 iMac can be configured with 256, 512, 1024 and 2048 GB of storage, So, 2 TB is the maximum internal storage.

    Based on the M1 Macs so far, if you are optioning up from 512 GB to 2 TB storage, that will cost +$600.
    I could not find the specs on Apple.  When I googled 2 websites said it Maxes out at 512.  If you’re correct then that is great news.  I was really confused since they state the new iPad has 2 TB of storage. 
    No worries. If you go to the "Tech Specs" page on Apple's website, it shows it there in a couple of places. At the very bottom of the Tech Specs page, there is a "Configure To Order" section. That shows what configuration options are available with the two iMac SKUs.

    Not sure what the chip shortages are doing to Apple's supply. Maybe these options will have longer delivery times. Who knows. But you have an iMac 5K. I'd wait for the large iMac to be announced or even the Mac Half Pro and "cheaper" external display.

    This iMac 24 is an interesting tweener though. 23.5" is big enough to take away some sales away from iMac 5K and probably the large iMac with Apple Silicon too. So, there are likely some people with 5+ year old iMac 27 machines that must be seriously thinking of getting it.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 273 of 283
    nhtnht Posts: 4,522member
    docno42 said:
    nht said:
    It’s one HDMI cable different. And if I mount the mini to the back of the display it becomes invisible.
    One cable?  Are you the reincarnation of Tesla and figured out wireless power transmission now too?  

    Also it's only "invisible" if your computer backs up against a wall without anything on the other side of it.  Otherwise it's a rats nest of cables again.  

    Lots of use cases where computers are not backed up against walls.

    If only Apple provided choice, they could solve this hopeless conundrum  :p
    Yes one cable. You can use a splitter on the monitor power cable to power the mini.

    Its $10 on Amazon.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B074DT4W6J/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_YM7P5JN2VC9EHM5F0GG0

    Then use a VESA mount ($15-$20 on Amazon) and short HDMI cable and you have one power cable to plug in.  The Y is a little fat but can be neatly cable tied to look clean.

    Personally I just leave the mini on the desk under the monitor.  It’s not a big deal.


  • Reply 274 of 283
    DetnatorDetnator Posts: 230member
    For people wondering why the new low end iMacs didn’t come in at previous generation’s lower price point, it's kinda typical for Apple to reset the price with a major redesign. 

    iMac G3 started at $1299 
    iMac G4 started at $1299
    iMac G5 started at $1299
    iMac Intel stated at $1299
    iMac Intel AL started at $1199
    iMac Intel AL thin at  $1299

    With the exception of the G4 each one went down in price over it's lifetime and then with a single exception the price went back to 1299 with the next redesign. The G4 iMacs were a little weird because they had the eMac come out which took the place of low end iMac. So there shouldn't be much surprise  when it comes to the price tag, it’s been remarkably consistent. Also, if you adjust for inflation the iMacs today cost about half as much as the original G3.
    This makes some sense.  My only issue with this one compared to previous redesigns is that you didn't step backwards in functionality outside of when they finally ditched the optical drive with the last version of the Intel aluminum one.  Before, the iMac either kept the same number or even added USB, Thunderbolt or Firewire ports.  It kept ethernet as a standard option, not a configurable one for more money.  And the only differentiator in the $1299 one and the same size ones that were more expensive were things like more memory, larger HDD or SSD, or a faster processor.  The entry level one didn't lack any features or functionality that the upgraded one had - it just had a slower processor, integrated graphics instead of discrete ones, less RAM, less storage space.  

    But with this one, they did return to the $1299 entry price but regressed on these kinds of things - just two thunderbolt ports, no ethernet.  It doesn't come with the Touch ID keyboard.  It's just, to me, a step backwards in terms how Apple has handled these redesign transitions in the past.  
    Dude you’re ranting over and over and over again the same speech.  Everyone who responds to critique you with good points you simply regurgitate the same crap you’re saying back again and again.  Let it go already. 

    Yes it lost Ethernet and some ports as standard. But it gained a far superior display and processor, WiFi upgrade, and a few other things.  

    For one, this WiFi, with a suitable router, is as close enough to gigabit Ethernet speeds that most entry level users (those this is aimed at) won’t even notice let alone care. And same with ports. The people this thing is aimed at just don’t use them. 

    You just don’t get it.  YOU don’t like it because you want the base cheap model to have everything. It can’t. And it never has. The base model has always compromised something. Usually it’s the processor and GPU if not other things as well but that wasn’t really an option to compromise in this one (unless maybe they might have put the A12 that was in the dev kit mini but I think most of us will agree it’s good they didn’t do that). So they compromised other stuff instead.  

    They could have released it with another spinning hard drive or or even less ports or no WiFi or who knows what else they could have left out. And no matter what they left out it would be a step back for something because otherwise literally everything in this new iMac is bigger, faster, better. 

    And no matter what they left out some idiot like you would be complaining about how the cheapest desktop Mac with easily the best display on the market by far in its price bracket didn’t have everything in it that the more expensive ones have. 

    I don’t know.  You tell us?  What should they have left out instead?  Or are you so greedy that you think they should add the better wifi, display and everything else they added and not take anything else out and also not hike the price a little as they’ve done every other new one (per the post above) to help offset the development costs?

    Despite what some people here seem to think when throwing around words like “greedy”, this stuff costs money to design, test, build, and get right, and they’re a business not a charity, and always have been. Nothing’s changed. Steve was no better than Tim with this.  Steve didn’t make cheap computers either. 

    They’ve done their research and they’ve left out what they have found to be the stuff the users it’s targeted to need the least, that can also have any kind of sensible impact on saving costs. 

    So dude... get over yourself. You’re not the authority on Apple’s target market. You have no idea what you’re talking about.
    edited April 2021 watto_cobradocno42
  • Reply 275 of 283

    Just because the power supply is magnetic, does not mean it can be easily detached. All I can find on Apple’s page about the new iMac is the power supply is easily attached. Did the keynote say the power supply is mag safe, or to prevent the computer from crashing down? Again the area of the magnet is larger and thus should be harder to detach. There is nothing on Apple’s webpages that there is a battery meant to prevent power loss. They could have enough capacitors to prevent power loss for a brief period. Apple doesn’t detail what the advantage of the magnet attachment is, other than easily attached. The magnet could simply be to ensure proper alignment. 
    This! People seem to be overlooking the fact that magnets differing levels of magnetic force to the extent that they can be impossible to separate by hand. The XDR display uses magnets to hold the display to the stand and you don’t see stories of people or pets accidentally bumping them lose.  People are assuming it will be like MagSafe which was designed to easily detach rather than something more appropriate for a desktop. It’s a totally misguided assumption. Apple can easily design something that offers the same level of secure for as the  previous solution. 
    So then, what is the advantage over the normal plug? Why did it need a redesign? My iMac power cable just stays connected.

    The fact Apple implemented this feature does beg the question of "what problem does this solve?". 
    That’s raising the question. Begging the question is when you presuppose an answer. 

    I assume it was redesigned this way to allow Apple to
    design a slimmer computer. But honesty I don’t know why you are asking me what Apple’s intent was. My comment was that the connection could be as secure as the previous method of connecting a power cable. I pointed it out because people were very concerned about the computer getting unplugged accidentally. 
  • Reply 276 of 283
    spheric said:

    Just because the power supply is magnetic, does not mean it can be easily detached. All I can find on Apple’s page about the new iMac is the power supply is easily attached. Did the keynote say the power supply is mag safe, or to prevent the computer from crashing down? Again the area of the magnet is larger and thus should be harder to detach. There is nothing on Apple’s webpages that there is a battery meant to prevent power loss. They could have enough capacitors to prevent power loss for a brief period. Apple doesn’t detail what the advantage of the magnet attachment is, other than easily attached. The magnet could simply be to ensure proper alignment. 
    This! People seem to be overlooking the fact that magnets differing levels of magnetic force to the extent that they can be impossible to separate by hand. The XDR display uses magnets to hold the display to the stand and you don’t see stories of people or pets accidentally bumping them lose.  People are assuming it will be like MagSafe which was designed to easily detach rather than something more appropriate for a desktop. It’s a totally misguided assumption. Apple can easily design something that offers the same level of secure for as the  previous solution. 
    So then, what is the advantage over the normal plug? Why did it need a redesign? My iMac power cable just stays connected.

    The fact Apple implemented this feature does beg the question of "what problem does this solve?". 
    How deep is the power socket on the back of your iMac?

    The new iMac is just shy of 12 mm thick. 

    I’m sure you can figure out one of the problems. 
    Okay, that would make perfect sense. Hadn’t thought of that but it should’ve been obvious. I do hope it’s strong enough to not dislodge easily.
  • Reply 277 of 283

    Just because the power supply is magnetic, does not mean it can be easily detached. All I can find on Apple’s page about the new iMac is the power supply is easily attached. Did the keynote say the power supply is mag safe, or to prevent the computer from crashing down? Again the area of the magnet is larger and thus should be harder to detach. There is nothing on Apple’s webpages that there is a battery meant to prevent power loss. They could have enough capacitors to prevent power loss for a brief period. Apple doesn’t detail what the advantage of the magnet attachment is, other than easily attached. The magnet could simply be to ensure proper alignment. 
    This! People seem to be overlooking the fact that magnets differing levels of magnetic force to the extent that they can be impossible to separate by hand. The XDR display uses magnets to hold the display to the stand and you don’t see stories of people or pets accidentally bumping them lose.  People are assuming it will be like MagSafe which was designed to easily detach rather than something more appropriate for a desktop. It’s a totally misguided assumption. Apple can easily design something that offers the same level of secure for as the  previous solution. 
    So then, what is the advantage over the normal plug? Why did it need a redesign? My iMac power cable just stays connected.

    The fact Apple implemented this feature does beg the question of "what problem does this solve?". 
    That’s raising the question. Begging the question is when you presuppose an answer. 

    I assume it was redesigned this way to allow Apple to
    design a slimmer computer. But honesty I don’t know why you are asking me what Apple’s intent was. My comment was that the connection could be as secure as the previous method of connecting a power cable. I pointed it out because people were very concerned about the computer getting unplugged accidentally. 
    I’m not asking you specifically but considering you made comments, I was addressing those. 

    The presupposition was that there wasn’t a problem that needed solving to begin with (making the question itself moot). But that has actually been answered.
  • Reply 278 of 283
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,662member
    Dibiase said:
    My $500 Xbox series X came with a 1TB SSD.  Come on apple.
    lol - the storage in your Xbox is no where near the performance level of whats in the iMac.
  • Reply 279 of 283
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,662member
    Beats said:
    I don’t think it needs a large battery but something that lasts maybe 15 minutes would be nice. When disconnected the screen can display a warning like
    ”Your iMac power cord has been disconnected. Please connect to avoid losing your data”

    The prompt could disable your computer until you reconnect.

    A built in UPS would be awesome - this thing is basically an iPad Pro with a bigger, non-touch display so why not?!?
  • Reply 280 of 283
    docno42docno42 Posts: 3,662member
    canucklehead said:
    So, what is the advantage of a magnetic connector?
    It's the only style of connector shallow enough to work with the "thin at all costs" design choices they made with the iMac.  

    Yes, they are solving a problem they also created - but as others point out, they can be strong magnets that can provide pull force greater than a traditional socket would if they wanted, especially since the design is to solve the depth of plug issue and not someone tripping over the cord issue as magsafe was with the laptops.

    Probably why they didn't brand it magsafe either - the point is the depth of the connector, not breakaway if someone trips over the cord  :p
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