Apple announces '1971: The Year That Music Changed Everything' docuseries

Posted:
in General Discussion
An upcoming Apple TV+ docuseries will explore the music that shaped the politics and culture of 1971.

Image Credit: Apple
Image Credit: Apple


"1971: The Year That Music Changed Everything" highlights artists of the time who used their music to inspire hope and change. The documentary will feature artists such as Lou Reed, Aretha Franklin, Bob Marley, The Rolling Stones, and more.

Billed as an "immersive, deep-dive rich with archival footage and interviews," the eight-part docuseries will release to Apple's streaming service on May 21.

The series will be executive produced by Academy, BAFTA, and Grammy Award winners Asif Kapadia and James Gay-Rees, known for their work on "Amy" and "Senna."

"1971: The Year That Music Changed Everything," will join other music and entertainment docuseries on the platform, including "Beastie Boys Story," "Billie Eilish: The World's A Little Blurry," and recently announced "Number One on the Call Sheet."

Comments

  • Reply 1 of 10
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 3,216member
    I have all my Apple Music favourite songs sorted by year, and I find the good years didn't start until at least 1975. Each year after that was pretty good, but the good years lasted until 1984. After that, there's been nothing good.
  • Reply 2 of 10
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,481member
    I have all my Apple Music favourite songs sorted by year, and I find the good years didn't start until at least 1975. Each year after that was pretty good, but the good years lasted until 1984. After that, there's been nothing good.
    Click bait.
    Oferlolliver
  • Reply 3 of 10
    bluefire1bluefire1 Posts: 1,243member
    60’s music, especially 1964-69, was when music was truly transformative. Just ask Simon & Garfunkel, The Stones, the Beatles, Iron Butterfly, The Doors, etc.
    edited April 2021 mobirdbonobobWgkrueger
  • Reply 4 of 10
    mobirdmobird Posts: 710member
    Eric Clapton, The Who, Fleetwood Mac (early), Spencer Davis Group, Bob Dylan, CSN&Y, Joan Baez...

    bluefire1 said:
    60’s music, especially 1964-69, was when music was truly transformative. Just ask Simon & Garfunkel, The Stones, the Beatles, Iron Butterfly, The Doors, etc.

    edited April 2021 dewmebluefire1
  • Reply 5 of 10
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,481member
    bluefire1 said:
    60’s music, especially 1964-69, was when music was truly transformative. Just ask Simon & Garfunkel, The Stones, the Beatles, Iron Butterfly, The Doors, etc.
    Still click bait. You could just as easily ask Miles Davis and John Coltrane about transformative music of the 1950s. Or you could ask L. van Beethoven about the late 1700s.
    lolliver
  • Reply 6 of 10
    entropysentropys Posts: 3,783member
    OK Boomers.
  • Reply 7 of 10
    rezwitsrezwits Posts: 838member
    "This is gonna be greeaat!" – Flounder (Animal House)
    jdgaz
  • Reply 8 of 10
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    Nothing like a claim about music's best years to bring the dinosaurs out.

    Personally I think the ratio of good music to crappy music has stayed pretty much even throughout modern era.  There was crap in 1971 and there's amazing transformative stuff now.
  • Reply 9 of 10
    Perhaps Apple forgets from where its very name derives.  And it wasn’t a product of 1971.
  • Reply 10 of 10
    crowleycrowley Posts: 10,453member
    BittySon said:
    Perhaps Apple forgets from where its very name derives.  And it wasn’t a product of 1971.
    You're saying that the best year in music is when Sir Isaac Newton got donked on the head with an apple in the 17th century?
    edited April 2021
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