Microsoft Windows 10X reportedly paused to focus on Windows 10 enhancements

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 7
A report suggests that Microsoft will not release Windows 10X in 2021, and the version originally shared "will likely never arrive."

The ill-fated Surface Neo running Windows 10X
The ill-fated Surface Neo running Windows 10X


Announced in 2019, Windows 10X was meant to be the next step in Windows design that ditched legacy components in favor of new technologies. The ambitious project was soon delayed and now may never see the light of day.

According to a report from Petri, people familiar with the Microsoft's plans state Windows 10X will not ship in 2021, and the OS as you know it today will likely never arrive. Microsoft has shifted its resources to improving Windows 10 and pushed the other project to the back burner.

Microsoft announced Windows 10X alongside the Surface Duo and Surface Neo -- dual screen devices that showcased the future of Windows. The Duo shipped in 2020 with Android as planned -- and the Neo was never released.

Windows Central confirms the report and says that Microsoft had in fact halted Windows 10X internal self host testing in February. All focus has shifted to Microsoft's "Sun Valley" Windows 10 UI refresh due later in 2021.

Sun Valley reportedly incorporates many of the enhancements that were promised in Windows 10X. Development of the new OS has halted, and there is no indication of if or when it will resume.

Apple, however, has had more luck rejuvenating its desktop operating system for modern hardware. It released macOS Big Sur with design paradigms that closely mimicked iOS and iPadOS in an effort to showcase its transition to Apple Silicon.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    jimh2jimh2 Posts: 334member
    What an original name.
    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 34
    Rayz2016Rayz2016 Posts: 6,777member
    This happens every five years. 

    They announce that they’re going to break with the past, release something that points to a legacy-free future. 

    Then a chap from marketing reminds them that if they do that, then they’re going to have to build market share from scratch. 

    And then the whole idea gets binned … for another five years. 
    kiltedgreenmuthuk_vanalingamAlex_Vviclauyycbyronlsloth77FileMakerFellerjony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 34
    kiltedgreenkiltedgreen Posts: 529member
    Using Big Sur (or any version of macOS) it’s consistent top to bottom in its interface, wherever you go.

    On Windows 10 it looks like one thing, then you go somewhere else, Windows 10, then click on a button and look, Windows Vista aesthetic and then click a few more and look, suddenly you’re looking at XP. It’s a cruddy mishmash. Not surprised that they don’t want to attempt untangling it.
    Alex_Vbyronljony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 4 of 34
    tokyojimutokyojimu Posts: 481member
    So sad they’re stuck at 10, when MacOS is already at 11.
    Alex_VdewmeMisterKitpascal007jony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 34
    Sounds like a repeat of Longhorn.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 34
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,146member
    Rayz2016 said:
    This happens every five years. 

    They announce that they’re going to break with the past, release something that points to a legacy-free future. 

    Then a chap from marketing reminds them that if they do that, then they’re going to have to build market share from scratch. 

    And then the whole idea gets binned … for another five years. 
    Microsoft is trapped in a legacy hellhole they cannot escape. As time marches on Windows gets ever more bloated because of this captivity. Apple has the luxury of just telling the legacy luddites to fuck off. Every Apple blog and every Apple discussion forum is loaded with outraged users livid because their legacy hardware and software no longer perform. The dropping of 32bit compatibility is just one example. Microsoft could never do that. Apple simply tells the legacy crowd too bad, so sad. The kicker is all those outraged legacy types stay with the platform anyway.
    Alex_VviclauyycbyronlFileMakerFellerjony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 34
    slurpyslurpy Posts: 5,316member
    Microsoft have always been cowards when it comes to taking even the tiniest risks, and moving things forward, and dropping legacy. Its why the newest surface laptops still come with USB-A ports. They're just so fucking terrified of losing customers if they drop them, and thus they're slowing down the full adoption of USB-C and extending the transition indefinitely. Thats how little confidence they have in the merits of their products. They lean on ancient tech as some kind of competitive advantage. 
    Alex_Vrezwitsjony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 34
    MaxLe0p0ldMaxLe0p0ld Posts: 21unconfirmed, member
    I wonder when the Microsoft Surface NEO Laptop is finally making its Debut ?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 34
    viclauyycviclauyyc Posts: 659member
    slurpy said:
    Microsoft have always been cowards when it comes to taking even the tiniest risks, and moving things forward, and dropping legacy. Its why the newest surface laptops still come with USB-A ports. They're just so fucking terrified of losing customers if they drop them, and thus they're slowing down the full adoption of USB-C and extending the transition indefinitely. Thats how little confidence they have in the merits of their products. They lean on ancient tech as some kind of competitive advantage. 
    Honestly I don’t mind to have a USB A port in my MBP 16. Most of the stuff in my house still use USB A, same thing applies to new USB devices in market. I know USB C need an extra push but do Apple need to go in all the way and sacrifice user experience? 
    GeorgeBMac
  • Reply 10 of 34
    hexclockhexclock Posts: 912member
    Using Big Sur (or any version of macOS) it’s consistent top to bottom in its interface, wherever you go.

    On Windows 10 it looks like one thing, then you go somewhere else, Windows 10, then click on a button and look, Windows Vista aesthetic and then click a few more and look, suddenly you’re looking at XP. It’s a cruddy mishmash. Not surprised that they don’t want to attempt untangling it.
    Microsoft has always sucked at UI design. Always. 
    rezwitsjony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 34
    thedbathedba Posts: 647member
    After the M1 power bombed everyone in the legacy Wintel world, Microsoft announced that they had started working on their own custom ARM chip. 
    Not surprised that many Windows projects are being relegated to the back burner. 
    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 34
    DAalsethDAalseth Posts: 1,565member
    A full redesign, a break with the past, that is now not going to be released, oh but it will be, just as a series of updates to the existing OS….

    Code name for this wasn’t Microsoft Copeland was it?
    FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 34
    fastasleepfastasleep Posts: 5,418member
    I'm holding out for Windows 10X Series X
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 34
    KITAKITA Posts: 353member
    thedba said:
    After the M1 power bombed everyone in the legacy Wintel world, Microsoft announced that they had started working on their own custom ARM chip. 
    Not surprised that many Windows projects are being relegated to the back burner. 

    Microsoft's custom Arm chip development is aimed at Azure to compete with Amazon's AWS.

    Graviton2, based on Neoverse N1, is already around 15% of AWS instances and offers customers up to 40% better price performance than a traditional x86 instance.



    Meanwhile, Graviton3 will likely be based on Neoverse N2 (Armv9) cores later this year.



    To top it off, other server Arm CPUs, such as the Ampere Altra (80 core) already offer some compelling performance compared to x86 offerings from Intel/AMD.

    SPEC2017 Rate-N Estimated Total

    If anything, Microsoft is waiting for Qualcomm's NUVIA based Arm chip for high performance laptops in 2022.




    dewmeFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 15 of 34
    larryjwlarryjw Posts: 787member
    Windows 10X abandoned certainly could mean no Windows for ARM, but that might simply mean MS decided the 10X approach was not viable. 

    MS may be learning from Apple how to rearchitect Windows to work on both Intel and Arm processors. If Apple can do it, so can Microsoft. 
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 34
    mike54mike54 Posts: 433member
    slurpy said:
    Microsoft have always been cowards when it comes to taking even the tiniest risks, and moving things forward, and dropping legacy. Its why the newest surface laptops still come with USB-A ports. They're just so fucking terrified of losing customers if they drop them, and thus they're slowing down the full adoption of USB-C and extending the transition indefinitely. Thats how little confidence they have in the merits of their products. They lean on ancient tech as some kind of competitive advantage. 
    Millions still heavily use USB-A ports. eg There are millions of USB-A thumbs drives in use and nearly all thumbdrives in stores are all USB-A. A USB-A port is not that big. Foolish to get rid of this port.
    GeorgeBMacFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 17 of 34
    thedbathedba Posts: 647member
    KITA said:
    thedba said:
    After the M1 power bombed everyone in the legacy Wintel world, Microsoft announced that they had started working on their own custom ARM chip. 
    Not surprised that many Windows projects are being relegated to the back burner. 

    Microsoft's custom Arm chip development is aimed at Azure to compete with Amazon's AWS.

    Graviton2, based on Neoverse N1, is already around 15% of AWS instances and offers customers up to 40% better price performance than a traditional x86 instance.



    Meanwhile, Graviton3 will likely be based on Neoverse N2 (Armv9) cores later this year.



    To top it off, other server Arm CPUs, such as the Ampere Altra (80 core) already offer some compelling performance compared to x86 offerings from Intel/AMD.

    SPEC2017 Rate-N Estimated Total

    If anything, Microsoft is waiting for Qualcomm's NUVIA based Arm chip for high performance laptops in 2022.




    While I have no doubt that they’re working on it for their server farms, I’m talking about this
    https://goodereader.com/blog/tablet-slates/microsoft-working-on-custom-arm-chips-to-power-surface-devices-in-future

    Taking a cue from Apple, Microsoft too is designing its own custom ARM chip to power its future server devices. This will make for a watershed moment in the history of the Redmond based software behemoth that has for decades largely relied on Intel chips for its hardware endeavors.
    What should be even more worrying for Intel is that Microsoft is reported to be working on another chip that will go on to power some of its consumer-oriented Surface line of devices. Not surprisingly, Intel’s shares took a hit, dropping 6.3 percent in New York and has been down 21 percent this year.

    Besides, why would they want to go with ARM for their Windows Server farms and not for their desktop/laptop line?
    edited May 8 dewmewatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 34
    crowleycrowley Posts: 7,893member
    slurpy said:
    Microsoft have always been cowards when it comes to taking even the tiniest risks, and moving things forward, and dropping legacy. Its why the newest surface laptops still come with USB-A ports. They're just so fucking terrified of losing customers if they drop them, and thus they're slowing down the full adoption of USB-C and extending the transition indefinitely. Thats how little confidence they have in the merits of their products. They lean on ancient tech as some kind of competitive advantage. 
    It's not cowardice, it's commitment to backwards compatibility.  There are files and software created decades ago that still work on modern Windows machines.  That's admirable in a sense, though it does limit their ability to deliver something new that rocks the boat.  But it means that business and customers are assured that things won't break if they stick with Microsoft, which is a large part of why they're so successful, they've willingly tied themselves to legacy.

    Having different priorities to Apple is not a weakness, it's just different.

    Also, I would like a USB-A port on my Mac.  It'd be very useful.
    muthuk_vanalingamFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 19 of 34
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 9,494member
    lkrupp said:
    Rayz2016 said:
    This happens every five years. 

    They announce that they’re going to break with the past, release something that points to a legacy-free future. 

    Then a chap from marketing reminds them that if they do that, then they’re going to have to build market share from scratch. 

    And then the whole idea gets binned … for another five years. 
    Microsoft is trapped in a legacy hellhole they cannot escape. As time marches on Windows gets ever more bloated because of this captivity. Apple has the luxury of just telling the legacy luddites to fuck off. Every Apple blog and every Apple discussion forum is loaded with outraged users livid because their legacy hardware and software no longer perform. The dropping of 32bit compatibility is just one example. Microsoft could never do that. Apple simply tells the legacy crowd too bad, so sad. The kicker is all those outraged legacy types stay with the platform anyway.
    That may be one of the reasons why MacOS is an "also ran".

    Support for older hardware is one of the strengths Windows has.   We saw that with WIndows 7 as well as with IE:  Microsoft wanted to move on but its users, particularly corporate users had too much invested in those so called "legacy systems".  Currently the 14 year old Thinkpad I use for financial work is running Windows 8.1.  But, when I get a break from yard work and tutoring my grandson, I plan to stick in an SSD and upgrade it Windows 10.   Why not?  It runs fine, the upgrade will cost almost nothing and will stop me from having to sink money into a new machine for a few more years.

    Another example is COBOL, the business language the proliferated in 30-40 years ago.  Today many businesses still run on business critical systems developed with it.  

    The truth is:  while hardware can continue to move forward, it is the software that businesses rely on and where the investment lies.  They aren't going to walk away from that investment quickly or easily.  And, in some cases, like COBOL, they can't.  The resources to replace it aren't available.

    muthuk_vanalingamFileMakerFeller
  • Reply 20 of 34
    rezwitsrezwits Posts: 728member
    What's even more hilarious (without quoting from above), is Microsoft, is going towards ARM & Linux.

    Heck, they've already been using their Linux for Azure installs, from what I hear.

    Then they just bought up some other Linux Distro (again).

    From my standpoint, and this has been the same:

    MS said Windows 10 is the LAST Windows, just expect updates ( I think they mean that! )

    What that means IS FORGET ABOUT IT!  You've got your crummy WIndows
    and that's all boys, they are moving on to other worlds... (i.e. platforms)
    essentially "They've dropped Windows."  Sure it'll be updated and every once in a while
    they will go oh Windows 10 (++whatever) but that's gonna be their and the LEGACY of Windows...
    watto_cobra
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