Apple MagSafe Battery Pack Review: Great, but controversial

Posted:
in iPhone edited August 5
Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack for iPhone 12 is mired in controversy over its capacity and price. After using it for a while, it has become one of our go-to accessories.

Apple MagSafe Battery Pack on iPhone 12


Unintended as a way to extend your battery for days, Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack is the ideal solution when you need those crucial extra few hours or have to get through that long weekend. Assuming you have your expectations in line with Apple's design, the MagSafe Battery Pack is the best you can do.

Design and build

Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack is a compact device. It will just slightly double the thickness of your iPhone which is notably thinner than most third-party options we've seen to date.





The outside is a soft-touch plastic shell and thus far has held up well to fingerprints, dirt, and dust. Much better than Apple's silicone cases do. Apple has, as it tends to do, kept things minimal. There are no buttons or controls whatsoever.

The only penetrations into the plastic are a pinhole LED that lets you know the battery status while plugged in and that Lightning port for charging.

Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack has Lightning for input, no Qi or MagSafe
Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack has Lightning for input, no Qi or MagSafe


The charging side of the battery has a light grey rubberized pad to prevent slippage, recessed in the distinctive MagSafe shape. We've seen deformation of leather cases when connected with MagSafe -- and Apple tells users to expect it.

Using Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack with Nomad's Rugged Case
Using Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack with Nomad's Rugged Case


This back panel appears to be a stock Apple component or strictly regulated in the program Apple controls true Magsafe peripherals with. When compared to the only authorized third-party MagSafe mount from Belkin, there are no differences.

Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack (left) and Belkin's Car Mount Pro (right)
Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack (left) and Belkin's Car Mount Pro (right)


Combined, all of this delivers a click when you connect the battery to an iPhone. We assumed the click was either a design feature or issue when we reviewed the Belkin vent mount but now see that the cause must lie with Apple.

The best we can describe it is that as you bring the magnets towards one another, the attraction causes an internal magnet to shift, hitting against the plastic surface and click. It doesn't rattle, and you only hear it when putting the battery on, but with the folks we've spoken to about it, it can be off-putting.

We love Apple's minimalist nature here. You shouldn't be required to think about a battery pack and certainly shouldn't need to turn it on or off.

The magic of MagSafe means if you don't need it, you can remove it. It charges when it needs to and is one less thing for you to worry about.

Integration with iOS

To diffuse any responsibility on your part in managing your battery, Apple has put in place tight integration with iOS. To fully support the battery, users need to have iOS 14.7 or later. Currently, beta users of iOS 15 don't have full support, but we're expecting it soon.

The on-screen animation whenever the battery pack is attached
The on-screen animation whenever the battery pack is attached


When you connect the battery to your phone, a slick graphic appears on-screen that animates in. The center shows your iPhone's battery percentage both in numerical fashion as well as graphically. Below that, and much smaller, is an animation displaying the battery pack's battery.

If your iPhone is in low power mode, the circle will highlight in yellow rather than green.

At any time, you can also glance the battery's remaining capacity with Apple's battery widget on your Home Screen. The battery widget can also be Smart Stack so that it intelligently shows when your battery pack is connected.

Apple's battery widget
Apple's battery widget


A battery is not eternal. Given the volume and capacity that it has, an iPhone battery's overall life is generally measured in years. User behavior can cut this down, and Apple has taken steps to help with this, and minimize the accumulation of minor damages over time.

When the battery is connected to an iPhone, it will charge your iPhone up to 90 percent before stopping, using Apple's smart battery charging algorithm. The final stretch from 90% to 100% takes a disproportionate toll on overall battery longevity versus the rest of the charge, so Apple keeps you topped off at 90% rather than letting your battery take the hit.

You can go past this 90% if you'd like by going into Control Center and manually allowing it.

In a further extension of battery maintenance, if the iPhone internal temperature is high, the battery will cut off charting when the phone hits 80%. High temperatures are also harmful to lithium batteries, so battery charging is halted a bit earlier to prevent any further damage.

Capacity and speed

Apple isn't exactly transparent about what it expects any user to see in real life when using the MagSafe Battery.

On the rear of the battery pack, we can see the posted capacity is 1640 mAh, with third-party models boasting 5,000 mAh. But as we discussed in depth, this isn't a fair comparison -- and this battery has much more capacity than it appears just based on a milliamp-hour rating, which doesn't tell the whole story.

We charged up our iPhone 12 Pro Max from a dead battery and a fully charged MagSafe Battery Pack. It took almost two hours on the dot for the battery pack to drain and charged our iPhone up to 53 percent.

Apple's MagSafe Battery pack isn't designed for multiple iPhone charges on one fully-powered battery pack. Like its predecessor, it's designed for scenarios like those rare 18-hour workdays, when everything around you is on fire, and you need to eke out a few more hours from your iPhone when away from a wall socket.

Small yet mighty. Apple's battery compared to the Hyper (left) and Mophie (right) models.
Small yet mighty. Apple's battery compared to the Hyper (left) and Mophie (right) models.


Those third-party batteries that loudly tout those larger 5,000mAh capacities don't get you nearly as far as you'd expect either. With a Qi efficiency rating of only about 50% versus MagSafe's close to 80%, those will get you almost the same amount of usable power as Apple's battery pack.

The battery can sit on the back of our phone as much as it needs to. We aren't looking for speed. We prefer the battery to stay healthy combined with getting much actual runtime per day as possible.

Apple says the battery will provide 5W of power while on your phone, and that can boost up to 15W of power while connected via Lightning. Apple hasn't said how fast the battery pack itself can charge, but this can be tested.

Charging the MagSafe Battery by itself averaged 17W and it averaged 20W when the iPhone was also connected
Charging the MagSafe Battery by itself averaged 17W and it averaged 20W when the iPhone was also connected


Using a power gauge, we measured an average of 17W of input power using a USB-C Lightning cable. When we connected our iPhone to the battery, which is then in turn connected to power by Lightning, we saw this jump up to over 20W of power.

Connecting with Lightning allows the MagSafe Battery to charge at roughly 5W. At the same time, your iPhone will charge with 15W of power simultaneously.

It is also important to note one of the best features of Apple's battery. It is the first -- and only -- device to support reverse wireless charging from an iPhone 12. When you have your iPhone connected via Lightning, it can charge an attached battery pack.

This is immensely helpful if you need to connect your iPhone to another device, the best example being CarPlay. You can hop in your car, connect your iPhone to your car's interface, and charge both your phone and battery at the same time. No other battery pack can do this.

As MagSafe is fully backward compatible with Qi, this is technically able to charge any other Qi-enabled device.

Bafflingly, though, you can't take a MagSafe charger and use it to charge the battery pack.

Charging AirPods Pro on the MagSafe Battery Pack
Charging AirPods Pro on the MagSafe Battery Pack


As an example, we could place our AirPods Pro on the circle, and they instantly began to charge. You could charge any older iPhones or Android devices too.

Controversy can't be avoided

Apple product releases always have some level of controversy, but it seems unusually loud this time around. Some of the "issues" we agree with, and some we don't.

Opinion-laden commenters have had issues with the unit's dimensions, the weight, the input method, the lack of buttons, the 5W charging speeds, the capacity, and the lack of color options.




No one product is perfect for every consumer. While we're sure folks complaining about the dimensions have their own reasons, applying a very personal conclusion like whether or not the phone and battery will fit in your pants pocket and using the widest of brushes to spread that opinion across the board doesn't suit anybody.

Apple only offers the battery in white, and it is a different shade of white compared to Apple's white silicone case. This seems like an odd choice, but it may come down to the chemistry of the different materials.

Of all the criticisms, we agree with the input method most. Lightning is fine, but with the launch of the iPhone 12, we've moved many charging solutions to MagSafe.

The times you'd need this battery most, such as while traveling, are the exact times we're trying to pack minimally and stick with just MagSafe. Now a second cable -- albeit a small one -- will always be needed to be brought if the battery pack is to remain charged.

In an ideal world, the MagSafe Battery Pack would itself be charged via Magsafe. MagSafe in, MagSafe out.

A relatively minor issue is that you can only mount one MagSafe device at a time on an iPhone. If you've got the MagSafe wallet, for instance, you'll be swapping it in and out for that long night on the town. Fortunately, the wallet and battery are slim enough to fit into most pockets.

Should you buy Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack?

This battery pack is certainly not for everyone and is a niche product. Some people can get a couple of days out of their iPhone's battery, so the need for an external one is moot.

There are also many more affordable options on the market, though as we already expressed, we don't think that trade-off is worth it.

V
Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack


If you find yourself on occasion needing to squeeze a few more hours out of your iPhone before you get home, and Low Power Mode isn't quite doing it, Apple's MagSafe battery is going to be as good as it gets. It is compact, solid, effortless to use, integrates well into iOS, and has features built-in for both the MagSafe battery and your phone's battery long-term health.

The price isn't inconsequential. The MagSafe Battery is priced like most of Apple's products. Whether or not that price is worth it depends very much on how you value deep Apple integrations.

Pros
  • Compact form factor

  • Wonderful iOS integration

  • Thoughtful battery health features

  • Fast power input

  • Up to 15W of power while plugged in

  • Magnetic force is strong

  • Uses same Lightning cable as iPhone

  • Provides good amount of charge to latest iPhones

  • Supports reverse wireless charging
Cons
  • No color options

  • No MagSafe or Qi input

  • Typical Apple price tag

  • Sometimes off-putting click when connecting

Rating: 4 out of 5

MagSafe Battery Pack deals

Apple's MagSafe Battery Pack retails for $99, but AppleInsider readers can exclusively get a free $10 Adorama gift card with promo code APINSIDER. For activation instructions, check out the MagSafe deal here.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 35
    tommikeletommikele Posts: 511member
    As usual , with charging devices and cabling, Anker offers a superior product and much better value than Apple.
    williamlondonlkruppchemengin1
  • Reply 2 of 35
    lkrupplkrupp Posts: 9,455member
    “mired in controversy”

    Absolutely hilarious 😂 
    dj2k3000williamlondonbshankArchStantonerniefairchild1baconstangapplguysully54watto_cobraargonaut
  • Reply 3 of 35
    crowleycrowley Posts: 8,724member
    People not wanting something isn’t a controversy.
    dj2k3000erniefairchild1applguysully54chemengin1nadrielargonaut
  • Reply 4 of 35
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 11,566member
    tommikele said:
    As usual , with charging devices and cabling, Anker offers a superior product and much better value than Apple.
    Define value, please. From what I’ve read Anker is like the others - less efficient and unable to charge rapidly when plugged in. Two things this battery is better at. Also, reserve charging via one cable plugged into the iPhone. These all offer value. 
    edited July 24 jdb8167dj2k3000qwerty52williamlondonbluefire1bshankrepressthiscaladanianpulseimageserniefairchild1
  • Reply 5 of 35
    dewmedewme Posts: 3,814member
    There’s no denying the fact that this thing is chubby (fat, husky, big boned, obese, or whatever word you prefer). It may very well be less chubby than other brand equivalent products, but it is still a little heifer. The fact is that Apple obviously goes to great lengths not to present any pictures of this thing mounted on an iPhone in full profile on their web site, where its considerable girth compared to the host iPhone would be very apparent (as in - it’s thicker than the damn phone), is very telling. All of the semi profile pictures are showing it unmounted.

    Yes, prospective customers can dig around on the web to obtain the stats or see more pictures, but I still believe that sellers of this category of add-on products are being deceptive if they don’t show the thing mounted on the phone in full profile, where the add-on device’s thickness relative to the phone is most glaring and obvious. Apple itself is trying to disguise its chubbiness. Why?

    None of this disqualifies the product in any way as long as it does the job that it is intended to do. But in fairness to prospective customers, and to promote full disclosure prior to sale, Apple should show at least ONE full profile picture of the portly little beast mounted on an iPhone so buyers purchasing the product sight-unseen will be less shocked when they unpack it at home. 
    williamlondonargonaut
  • Reply 6 of 35
    GeorgeBMacGeorgeBMac Posts: 10,262member
    As so often happens Apple produces a product that is atypical and not what people were expecting.   So, people compare it to existing products and their expectations and find it wanting.

    But, if you start with what the product was designed for then you find that it's a very nice product.

    This battery pack is obviously not meant to keep a phone running while you spend a week in the woods away from electricity..
    Instead, it augments the existing battery on the phone -- either extending its charge or being used on an as-needed basis.

    What I like about it is you can use it as a wireless charger on your desk by keeping it plugged in.  Then, if you realize that you need a battery pack you simply unplug it and snap it onto your phone.  You don't have to worry as you rush out of the house that you have both dead phone and a dead charging battery.
    thtsflagelhcrefugeeerniefairchild1mike1watto_cobraargonaut
  • Reply 7 of 35
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 623member
    Convenient, all the power I’ll need, none of the weight I don’t, for my 12 pro max. 
    williamlondonGeorgeBMaclkruppwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 35
    It seems you're referencing MaxTech with your sideswipes about controversy. The problem with indirectly criticizing other channels, it makes you look weak and cowardly, not them. MaxTech gets a lot of heat because they set the tone with investigative reviews of Apple products. They're not afraid to have strong opinions. They make reviewing a long-term conversation. All of these things help clicks, as the trolls have pointed out. But they also reflect the reality that tech products take time to understand in real-world use.

    Have a problem with what they're saying? Reference them directly. It will only improve your site. I've watched many channels and sites try to bury their influence with indirect innuendo. And yet, MaxTech still leads the way because they're talking directly to viewers and not playing the industry game like you are here. 
    edited July 24 MplsP
  • Reply 9 of 35
    maltzmaltz Posts: 275member
    tommikele said:
    As usual , with charging devices and cabling, Anker offers a superior product and much better value than Apple.
    Define value, please. From what I’ve read Anker is like the others - less efficient and unable to charge rapidly when plugged in. Two things this battery is better at. Also, reserve charging via one cable plugged into the iPhone. These all offer value. 

    Anker's value:  larger capacity (even taking into account its lower charging efficiency) at half the price.  But as with anything, which device is right for someone will vary depending on their priorities.
    MplsPmuthuk_vanalingamchemengin1nadriel
  • Reply 10 of 35
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,259administrator
    It seems you're referencing MaxTech with your sideswipes about controversy. The problem with indirectly criticizing other channels, it makes you look weak and cowardly, not them. MaxTech gets a lot of heat because they set the tone with investigative reviews of Apple products. They're not afraid to have strong opinions. They make reviewing a long-term conversation. All of these things help clicks, as the trolls have pointed out. But they also reflect the reality that tech products take time to understand in real-world use.

    Have a problem with what they're saying? Reference them directly. It will only improve your site. I've watched many channels and sites try to bury their influence with indirect innuendo. And yet, MaxTech still leads the way because they're talking directly to viewers and not playing the industry game like you are here. 
    Your interpretation is incorrect. If we were calling anybody out, we'd do so by name. They jumped on that train well after the controversies and discussion started.

    In regards to criticizing other channels, we've done so before, and will do so again, if necessary.

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/19/04/02/editorial-cbc-again-attacks-apples-repair-policies-but-still-lacks-knowledge-of-how-repair-really-works
    https://appleinsider.com/articles/18/10/09/cbc-video-claims-apples-repair-policies-are-abusive-but-proof-falls-far-short
    https://appleinsider.com/articles/18/04/18/apple-refusing-to-fix-youtubers-imac-pro-claims-low-on-facts-light-on-details

    There are more, if you're inclined to look.

    FWIW, they started their career here at AppleInsider. I will be happy to discuss the facts of their exit in a DM if you are so inclined.

    edited July 24 corebeliefsbshankrepressthisGeorgeBMacsdw2001muthuk_vanalingamwatto_cobraargonaut
  • Reply 11 of 35
    bluefire1bluefire1 Posts: 1,155member
    I bought it and love it. 
    repressthisGeorgeBMaccaladanianJFC_PAerniefairchild1macguiwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 35
    It seems you're referencing MaxTech with your sideswipes about controversy. The problem with indirectly criticizing other channels, it makes you look weak and cowardly, not them. MaxTech gets a lot of heat because they set the tone with investigative reviews of Apple products. They're not afraid to have strong opinions. They make reviewing a long-term conversation. All of these things help clicks, as the trolls have pointed out. But they also reflect the reality that tech products take time to understand in real-world use.

    Have a problem with what they're saying? Reference them directly. It will only improve your site. I've watched many channels and sites try to bury their influence with indirect innuendo. And yet, MaxTech still leads the way because they're talking directly to viewers and not playing the industry game like you are here. 
    Your interpretation is incorrect. If we were calling anybody out, we'd do so by name. They jumped on that train well after the controversies and discussion started.

    In regards to criticizing other channels, we've done so before, and will do so again, if necessary.

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/19/04/02/editorial-cbc-again-attacks-apples-repair-policies-but-still-lacks-knowledge-of-how-repair-really-works
    https://appleinsider.com/articles/18/10/09/cbc-video-claims-apples-repair-policies-are-abusive-but-proof-falls-far-short
    https://appleinsider.com/articles/18/04/18/apple-refusing-to-fix-youtubers-imac-pro-claims-low-on-facts-light-on-details

    There are more, if you're inclined to look.

    FWIW, they started their career here at AppleInsider. I will be happy to discuss the facts of their exit in a DM if you are so inclined.

    Thank you for your reply. AppleInsider is a daily stop for me, so I do feel part of the community here (although I post rarely). I understand it's hard to balance a review with greater context, to keep the review a manageable length. It's just one reader's takeaway, that referencing controversy without a source or sources raises more questions and distracts from the point being made. Overall, I see AppleInsider's editorial point of view as very valid, to be a voice of reason in a click-driven world.

    I was aware that Max and crew were part of your team. Their editorial stance is able to be critiqued, in part because they are so open about their opinions. I apologize if my reading into your description of controversy was mistaken. MaxTech was at the heart of the Intel Macbook Air thermal throttling discussion. It seemed to me in that case, they were correct in that the Intel Air ran too hot, needlessly for upselling to the Pro. I'm not saying they are infallible, only that they speak plainly to their viewers, which is welcome.
    GeorgeBMacwatto_cobraargonaut
  • Reply 13 of 35
    Apple_BarApple_Bar Posts: 110member
    It seems you're referencing MaxTech with your sideswipes about controversy. The problem with indirectly criticizing other channels, it makes you look weak and cowardly, not them. MaxTech gets a lot of heat because they set the tone with investigative reviews of Apple products. They're not afraid to have strong opinions. They make reviewing a long-term conversation. All of these things help clicks, as the trolls have pointed out. But they also reflect the reality that tech products take time to understand in real-world use.

    Have a problem with what they're saying? Reference them directly. It will only improve your site. I've watched many channels and sites try to bury their influence with indirect innuendo. And yet, MaxTech still leads the way because they're talking directly to viewers and not playing the industry game like you are here. 
    MaxTech does investigative reviews? has strong opinions? long-term conversations?

    They are garbage when it comes to review products and help people decide. I don’t use youtubers to make decisions or at least them BUT there are ton of people that actually are watching videos to help them make a decision of what product to buy. MaxTech and their confusing reviews of every apple products end up hurting their credibility. I have watched a lot of videos and the videos follows a pattern. Video #1 This product is awesome go buy it. Video #2 We changed our mind it sucks. Video #3 It’s better now Video #4 We were wrong about being wrong. 

    Sure it works for the clicks to their channel but they don't have any credibility. 

    I always tell people to watch several channels at some point you will get who’s there to actually review products and who’s there just for the clicks.
    firelockapplguymacguinadrielwatto_cobraargonaut
  • Reply 14 of 35
    Two things:

    1) I think the fact that this product is large just shows how much and how well they pack maH into the phone itself. Very little of it is chips, it’s basically all battery, whether 12, 12 pro, or max. Amazing.

    2) I’d love to know—maybe it’s on Apple’s site, but it would be welcome in the review, if the waterproof rating one gets with an iPhone 12 / pro is maintained when attaching this to it?

    Cheers!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 35
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,259administrator
    It seems you're referencing MaxTech with your sideswipes about controversy. The problem with indirectly criticizing other channels, it makes you look weak and cowardly, not them. MaxTech gets a lot of heat because they set the tone with investigative reviews of Apple products. They're not afraid to have strong opinions. They make reviewing a long-term conversation. All of these things help clicks, as the trolls have pointed out. But they also reflect the reality that tech products take time to understand in real-world use.

    Have a problem with what they're saying? Reference them directly. It will only improve your site. I've watched many channels and sites try to bury their influence with indirect innuendo. And yet, MaxTech still leads the way because they're talking directly to viewers and not playing the industry game like you are here. 
    Your interpretation is incorrect. If we were calling anybody out, we'd do so by name. They jumped on that train well after the controversies and discussion started.

    In regards to criticizing other channels, we've done so before, and will do so again, if necessary.

    https://appleinsider.com/articles/19/04/02/editorial-cbc-again-attacks-apples-repair-policies-but-still-lacks-knowledge-of-how-repair-really-works
    https://appleinsider.com/articles/18/10/09/cbc-video-claims-apples-repair-policies-are-abusive-but-proof-falls-far-short
    https://appleinsider.com/articles/18/04/18/apple-refusing-to-fix-youtubers-imac-pro-claims-low-on-facts-light-on-details

    There are more, if you're inclined to look.

    FWIW, they started their career here at AppleInsider. I will be happy to discuss the facts of their exit in a DM if you are so inclined.

    Thank you for your reply. AppleInsider is a daily stop for me, so I do feel part of the community here (although I post rarely). I understand it's hard to balance a review with greater context, to keep the review a manageable length. It's just one reader's takeaway, that referencing controversy without a source or sources raises more questions and distracts from the point being made. Overall, I see AppleInsider's editorial point of view as very valid, to be a voice of reason in a click-driven world.

    I was aware that Max and crew were part of your team. Their editorial stance is able to be critiqued, in part because they are so open about their opinions. I apologize if my reading into your description of controversy was mistaken. MaxTech was at the heart of the Intel Macbook Air thermal throttling discussion. It seemed to me in that case, they were correct in that the Intel Air ran too hot, needlessly for upselling to the Pro. I'm not saying they are infallible, only that they speak plainly to their viewers, which is welcome.
    Funny story about that. The day we got our 2018 MBP, I said to Max after some use of a unit here that the fans seemed to run a lot, and the machine was very hot to the touch. He got me some data because he had the unit we purchased for the review, we worked on a piece about it together, and I was on The Screen Savers discussing it (and what turned into Apple Silicon). 



    I barely recognize my office space in the video, it's been so long.

    That turned out to be bad software causing the throttling below the base frequency. They're still way too overly-dramatic about DOES IT THERMAL THROTTLE? Of course it does, this is by design. It's only an issue if said throttling pushes it below the base frequency -- which until Apple revised the firmware on the 2018 about a week later, it did.

    The MBA does not, and did not, drop below the base frequency. 

    FWIW, I wish them all the success in the world. I'm glad they're doing well. I disagree with much of their presentation, for most of the reasons that Apple_Bar elaborated upon.
    corebeliefsrepressthisnadrielwatto_cobraargonaut
  • Reply 16 of 35
    Apple_Bar said:
    It seems you're referencing MaxTech with your sideswipes about controversy. The problem with indirectly criticizing other channels, it makes you look weak and cowardly, not them. MaxTech gets a lot of heat because they set the tone with investigative reviews of Apple products. They're not afraid to have strong opinions. They make reviewing a long-term conversation. All of these things help clicks, as the trolls have pointed out. But they also reflect the reality that tech products take time to understand in real-world use.

    Have a problem with what they're saying? Reference them directly. It will only improve your site. I've watched many channels and sites try to bury their influence with indirect innuendo. And yet, MaxTech still leads the way because they're talking directly to viewers and not playing the industry game like you are here. 
    MaxTech does investigative reviews? has strong opinions? long-term conversations?

    They are garbage when it comes to review products and help people decide. I don’t use youtubers to make decisions or at least them BUT there are ton of people that actually are watching videos to help them make a decision of what product to buy. MaxTech and their confusing reviews of every apple products end up hurting their credibility. I have watched a lot of videos and the videos follows a pattern. Video #1 This product is awesome go buy it. Video #2 We changed our mind it sucks. Video #3 It’s better now Video #4 We were wrong about being wrong. 

    Sure it works for the clicks to their channel but they don't have any credibility. 

    I always tell people to watch several channels at some point you will get who’s there to actually review products and who’s there just for the clicks.
    Clearly, I don't agree with your assessment. Reaching for an inflammatory word like garbage doesn't help your credibility. Whether you disagree with their takes or not, their videos are not garbage.

    Yes, I do understand the meme that trolls have started, and that you have repeated here. I don't see it that way. With Apple products working in an ecosystem, there will be an unfolding conversation about how these products work. I think this strategy is a lot more relevant than one review that supposedly captures everything at the product's launch, or a long-term review that comes out when everyone has moved on to the next big thing. Having several videos that talk about evolving impressions is another way to go.

    Something that I think is lost on people who hate MaxTech, you are free not to watch their videos. You feel you're fact-checking me here, but you need facts to do that.

    And to AppleInsider staff, I won't respond to the hornet's nest that apparently comes with raising these guys. It wasn't my intention to stir the pot, but I truly felt you were referencing them in your headline about controversy. Thanks.
  • Reply 17 of 35
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,259administrator
    Two things:

    1) I think the fact that this product is large just shows how much and how well they pack maH into the phone itself. Very little of it is chips, it’s basically all battery, whether 12, 12 pro, or max. Amazing.

    2) I’d love to know—maybe it’s on Apple’s site, but it would be welcome in the review, if the waterproof rating one gets with an iPhone 12 / pro is maintained when attaching this to it?

    Cheers!
    I'm not sure I understand the scope of the question, fully. The iPhone 12 water resistance isn't changed with the battery attached.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 35
    Mike WuertheleMike Wuerthele Posts: 6,259administrator

    And to AppleInsider staff, I won't respond to the hornet's nest that apparently comes with raising these guys. It wasn't my intention to stir the pot, but I truly felt you were referencing them in your headline about controversy. Thanks.
    Don't worry about it - no offense taken from AI staff. They've found a niche, and they're doing well, so that's good.
    corebeliefsrepressthisGeorgeBMacwatto_cobraargonaut
  • Reply 19 of 35
    genovellegenovelle Posts: 1,265member
    I wonder if this is a product that suffered from diminished input from in person staffers. 
    erniefairchild1
  • Reply 20 of 35
    tommikele said:
    As usual , with charging devices and cabling, Anker offers a superior product and much better value than Apple.
    But I’m curious about the rather poor 50% efficiency of Qi charging vs 80% MagSafe. Wonder what the math works out to be with Anker vs Apple? Author alluded that Apple‘s rendition is better but I want to see some numbers or real world use.
    watto_cobra
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