South Korea ends Apple, Google control of app store payments

Posted:
in iPhone edited August 31
The South Korean government has voted to force Apple and Google to accept alternative payment in the App Store, threatening the companies' exclusive commission.

Center: flag of South Korea
Center: flag of South Korea


As expected, the South Korean plenary vote of the country's National Assembly has backed the Telecommunications Business Act. Apple and Google will no longer be able to require developers to sell apps via the App Store, and pay the companies' commission.

According to the Wall Street Journal, the bill has to now be signed into law by President Moon Jae-in. As well as blocking Apple and Google from exclusively using their own in-app payment systems, the new law will also ban them from unreasonably delaying or deleting apps.

These further conditions are intended to prevent the companies retaliating against app makers who choose to use alternative payment systems.

Should Apple or Google fail to comply with the new law, the government will fine them up to 3% of all of the revenues that the company earns in South Korea, including hardware sales.

"South Korea's new app store law is a significant development in the global fight to bring fairness to the digital economy," said Meghan DiMuzio, Executive Director of the Coalition for App Fairness. "We applaud South Korean lawmakers and President Moon Jae-in for setting an example for the rest of the world to hold app store gatekeepers accountable for their harmful and anti-competitive practices. The Coalition for App Fairness hopes U.S. and European lawmakers follow South Korea's lead and continue their important work to level the playing field for all app developers and users."

The vote comes after lobbying from Apple, Google, and other technology groups. Apple maintained that the provisions of the Telecommunications Business Act would mean the App Store could no longer stay the trusted place for downloading apps.

"User trust in App Store purchases will decrease as a result of this proposal," Apple said in a statement, "leading to fewer opportunities for the over 482,000 registered developers in Korea who have earned more than KRW8.55 trillion to date with Apple."

For its part, Google also stressed that a decision to pass the law would be damaging for both developers and consumers.

However, speaking before the vote, Korea Communications Commission Chairman Han Sang-hyuk said that work could continue on precisely how the law would be implemented.

"Adjustments can be made in executing the policy," he told reporters. "We are fully aware of the concerns of Apple and Google, so we will implement them in consideration of both industry stakeholders and users."

As yet, it is not clear whether the White House will respond to the vote. According to the Information Technology Industries Council in the US, South Korea's bill could be in violation of joint trade agreements.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 110
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 2,657member
    Now we find out if Apple/Google are willing to fight back.
    magman1979buttesilver
  • Reply 2 of 110
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I
    mikeybabesharrykatsarosigorskybshankrob53jfdesignsmagman1979buttesilverjahbladeDBSync
  • Reply 3 of 110
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I
    Imo, neither company is going to pull it's app store from SK.  That's silly.  SK is just the first in a line of countries that are probably going to pass similar legislation.  Neither Apple nor Google is going to leave those countries either.  Again, because it's silly.  Google has one issue (alternative pay system) and Apple has two (alternative pay system and alternative app stores).  The only thing that will have an impact on either store is the option of alternative pay systems.  Google has always lived with the specter of alt-stores and that threat has amounted to nothing of consequence.  Imo, it will be the same on the iOS side.  People are going to continue to go to the App Store just like they continue to go to the Play Store (even though there have been dozens of alt-stores since the beginning of Androids existence)

    The alt-pay systems might have a small impact initially.  Might.  My guess is both companies will have an indicator on apps that use their pay systems so customers know when an app uses an alternative.  Dollars to doughnuts, the vast majority of people will gravitate towards what they know, Apple and Google.  

    Forum people are all up in arms over what will amount to a nothing burger imo.  
    bshankmuthuk_vanalingamgatorguynadrielK!llSwitchigorskyfastasleepelijahgkurai_kage
  • Reply 4 of 110
    harrykatsarosharrykatsaros Posts: 43unconfirmed, member
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I

    100% agree. Pull the stores and leave South Korea scrambling until consumers rip the government a new one for trying to fix something that wasn’t broken. People retaliating against this legislation will prevent other countries from attempting to do the same. Allowing alternative stores opens up the platform to a world of hurt. There’s a reason I don’t use Android. I don’t want my experience as a consumer to be ruined or compromised because some clueless government bureaucrats half way around the world went on some bullshit self righteous crusade in seek of good press.
    edited August 31 bshankrob53mejsricmagman1979buttesilvergenovelleigorskyjahbladeDBSyncmcdave
  • Reply 5 of 110
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I

    100% agree. Pull the stores and leave South Korea scrambling until consumers rip the government a new one for trying to fix something that wasn’t broken. People retaliating against this legislation will prevent other countries from attempting to do the same. Allowing alternative stores opens up the platform to a world of hurt. There’s a reason I don’t use Android. I don’t want my experience as a consumer to be ruined or compromised because some clueless government bureaucrats half way around the world went on some bullshit self righteous crusade in seek of good press.
    Just because other app stores are allowed, doesn't mean that you have to download apps from them.  Stick with the Apple app store, and there is no change for you (or me).  I would never go to another app store other than Apple's, so not a big deal to me.  If people want to be stupid and download unknown apps from another site, that is on them, and one thing I really hope Apple does is have some sort of disclaimer that if you do, you may void your warranty.

    nadrielmagman1979urashiddbvaporDBSyncbaconstangmushmashuraharawatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 110
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 2,657member
    goofy1958 said:
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I

    100% agree. Pull the stores and leave South Korea scrambling until consumers rip the government a new one for trying to fix something that wasn’t broken. People retaliating against this legislation will prevent other countries from attempting to do the same. Allowing alternative stores opens up the platform to a world of hurt. There’s a reason I don’t use Android. I don’t want my experience as a consumer to be ruined or compromised because some clueless government bureaucrats half way around the world went on some bullshit self righteous crusade in seek of good press.
    Just because other app stores are allowed, doesn't mean that you have to download apps from them.  Stick with the Apple app store, and there is no change for you (or me).  I would never go to another app store other than Apple's, so not a big deal to me.  If people want to be stupid and download unknown apps from another site, that is on them, and one thing I really hope Apple does is have some sort of disclaimer that if you do, you may void your warranty.

    You make a fair case for consumer freedom. But you don't realize that corporations also have freedom to not be required to provide the software and services to allow for third party app stores. How would you like it if you sold lemonade on your street and were told by the government that you had to sell your neighbor's lemonade and give the profits of that lemonade to your neighbor? Apple works very hard and deserves the right to not have to share its app store profit with its competitors.
    bshankgeorgie01radarthekatericthehalfbeerob53beowulfschmidtmejsricmagman1979igorskyjahblade
  • Reply 7 of 110
    goofy1958 said:
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I

    100% agree. Pull the stores and leave South Korea scrambling until consumers rip the government a new one for trying to fix something that wasn’t broken. People retaliating against this legislation will prevent other countries from attempting to do the same. Allowing alternative stores opens up the platform to a world of hurt. There’s a reason I don’t use Android. I don’t want my experience as a consumer to be ruined or compromised because some clueless government bureaucrats half way around the world went on some bullshit self righteous crusade in seek of good press.
    Just because other app stores are allowed, doesn't mean that you have to download apps from them.  Stick with the Apple app store, and there is no change for you (or me).  I would never go to another app store other than Apple's, so not a big deal to me.  If people want to be stupid and download unknown apps from another site, that is on them, and one thing I really hope Apple does is have some sort of disclaimer that if you do, you may void your warranty.

    Apple couldn't put out a disclaimer stating using an alternative store or infrastructure would void the warranty.  That would be considered anti-competitive and would be smacked down in short order.  Example: Your screen has a small crack and you want it replaced before the crack grows.  Oh no there's an app on your phone from an alternative app store.  Warranty voided.  ←  That dog won't hunt.

    Apple could (and will if everything comes to fruition) put out a disclaimer that they are not liable for damage to device or information compromised by an alternative app store app.  Example: Alt-app store app steals cc and banking info or app causes chip to overheat and burn components.  ← Apple not responsible.  That dog will hunt.
    forgot usernamemuthuk_vanalingamgatorguynadrielbeowulfschmidtigorskydbvaporjahbladerobabaelijahg
  • Reply 8 of 110
    hriw-annon@xs4all.nl[email protected] Posts: 45unconfirmed, member
    “Adjustments can be made in executing the policy” sounds like a solicitation for bribes. 
    beowulfschmidtjfdesignsmagman1979igorskyjahbladebaconstangFileMakerFellerjony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 110
    goofy1958 said:
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I

    100% agree. Pull the stores and leave South Korea scrambling until consumers rip the government a new one for trying to fix something that wasn’t broken. People retaliating against this legislation will prevent other countries from attempting to do the same. Allowing alternative stores opens up the platform to a world of hurt. There’s a reason I don’t use Android. I don’t want my experience as a consumer to be ruined or compromised because some clueless government bureaucrats half way around the world went on some bullshit self righteous crusade in seek of good press.
    Just because other app stores are allowed, doesn't mean that you have to download apps from them.  Stick with the Apple app store, and there is no change for you (or me).  I would never go to another app store other than Apple's, so not a big deal to me.  If people want to be stupid and download unknown apps from another site, that is on them, and one thing I really hope Apple does is have some sort of disclaimer that if you do, you may void your warranty.

    You make a fair case for consumer freedom. But you don't realize that corporations also have freedom to not be required to provide the software and services to allow for third party app stores. How would you like it if you sold lemonade on your street and were told by the government that you had to sell your neighbor's lemonade and give the profits of that lemonade to your neighbor? Apple works very hard and deserves the right to not have to share its app store profit with its competitors.
    Apple sells lemonade cups (iPhones and iPads).  All the kids (devs) in the neighborhood can sell flavors of lemonade(apps) but they have to pour it from the Apple pitcher (App Store) and Apple gets a cut of their sale.  L'il Bobby has his own pitcher and doesn't think he needs to use the Apple pitcher.  He can just pour his lemonade into the customers cup from his pitcher.  Apple says no.  Use my cup, you gotta use my pitcher.  
    ↑↑↑ That's a more apt description of the situation.   In this little story, most are still going to use the Apple pitcher because it's what they're used to using.  Bobby eventually brings his flavor of lemonade back to the Apple pitcher because not enough people stopped using the Apple pitcher for it to be profitable.
    muthuk_vanalingamnadrielcanukstormelijahg
  • Reply 10 of 110
    “Adjustments can be made in executing the policy” sounds like a solicitation for bribes. 
    More like a shakedown. 
    magman1979randominternetpersonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 110
    hriw-annon@xs4all.nl[email protected] Posts: 45unconfirmed, member
    Maybe Apple is counting on there being rampant scamming, or at least enough to show other legislatures why this is a bad idea. 
    This may take a while, South Korea does not seem to have worked out yet how and if the “concerns of Apple and Google” can be addressed. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 110
    goofy1958 said:
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I

    100% agree. Pull the stores and leave South Korea scrambling until consumers rip the government a new one for trying to fix something that wasn’t broken. People retaliating against this legislation will prevent other countries from attempting to do the same. Allowing alternative stores opens up the platform to a world of hurt. There’s a reason I don’t use Android. I don’t want my experience as a consumer to be ruined or compromised because some clueless government bureaucrats half way around the world went on some bullshit self righteous crusade in seek of good press.
    Just because other app stores are allowed, doesn't mean that you have to download apps from them.  Stick with the Apple app store, and there is no change for you (or me).  I would never go to another app store other than Apple's, so not a big deal to me.  If people want to be stupid and download unknown apps from another site, that is on them, and one thing I really hope Apple does is have some sort of disclaimer that if you do, you may void your warranty.

    You make a fair case for consumer freedom. But you don't realize that corporations also have freedom to not be required to provide the software and services to allow for third party app stores. How would you like it if you sold lemonade on your street and were told by the government that you had to sell your neighbor's lemonade and give the profits of that lemonade to your neighbor? Apple works very hard and deserves the right to not have to share its app store profit with its competitors.
    Apple sells lemonade cups (iPhones and iPads).  All the kids (devs) in the neighborhood can sell flavors of lemonade(apps) but they have to pour it from the Apple pitcher (App Store) and Apple gets a cut of their sale.  L'il Bobby has his own pitcher and doesn't think he needs to use the Apple pitcher.  He can just pour his lemonade into the customers cup from his pitcher.  Apple says no.  Use my cup, you gotta use my pitcher.  
    ↑↑↑ That's a more apt description of the situation.   In this little story, most are still going to use the Apple pitcher because it's what they're used to using.  Bobby eventually brings his flavor of lemonade back to the Apple pitcher because not enough people stopped using the Apple pitcher for it to be profitable.
    It’s also possible that Bobby’s pitcher has knockoff apps of legitimate apps from Apple’s and more people flock to it because it’s free, (a real possibility). Those apps could have malicious code and now they get an easy entrance into the Apple cup. What now? Does Apple cover the cost if the malicious code damages the hardware? 
    magman1979jahbladen2itivguyjony0watto_cobra
  • Reply 13 of 110
    hriw-annon@xs4all.nl[email protected] Posts: 45unconfirmed, member
    goofy1958 said:
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I

    100% agree. Pull the stores and leave South Korea scrambling until consumers rip the government a new one for trying to fix something that wasn’t broken. People retaliating against this legislation will prevent other countries from attempting to do the same. Allowing alternative stores opens up the platform to a world of hurt. There’s a reason I don’t use Android. I don’t want my experience as a consumer to be ruined or compromised because some clueless government bureaucrats half way around the world went on some bullshit self righteous crusade in seek of good press.
    Just because other app stores are allowed, doesn't mean that you have to download apps from them.  Stick with the Apple app store, and there is no change for you (or me).  I would never go to another app store other than Apple's, so not a big deal to me.  If people want to be stupid and download unknown apps from another site, that is on them, and one thing I really hope Apple does is have some sort of disclaimer that if you do, you may void your warranty.

    You make a fair case for consumer freedom. But you don't realize that corporations also have freedom to not be required to provide the software and services to allow for third party app stores. How would you like it if you sold lemonade on your street and were told by the government that you had to sell your neighbor's lemonade and give the profits of that lemonade to your neighbor? Apple works very hard and deserves the right to not have to share its app store profit with its competitors.
    Apple sells lemonade cups (iPhones and iPads).  All the kids (devs) in the neighborhood can sell flavors of lemonade(apps) but they have to pour it from the Apple pitcher (App Store) and Apple gets a cut of their sale.  L'il Bobby has his own pitcher and doesn't think he needs to use the Apple pitcher.  He can just pour his lemonade into the customers cup from his pitcher.  Apple says no.  Use my cup, you gotta use my pitcher.  
    ↑↑↑ That's a more apt description of the situation.   In this little story, most are still going to use the Apple pitcher because it's what they're used to using.  Bobby eventually brings his flavor of lemonade back to the Apple pitcher because not enough people stopped using the Apple pitcher for it to be profitable.
    As far as I can see this is about payment, not AppStores. It’s like devs can have their users pay in the same way users can now pay for physical goods, like Uber rides, pizza, groceries. 


  • Reply 14 of 110
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,302member
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I
    Imo, neither company is going to pull it's app store from SK.  That's silly.  SK is just the first in a line of countries that are probably going to pass similar legislation...
    Forum people are all up in arms over what will amount to a nothing burger imo.  
    The bigger issue will be a similar European legislative effort, the Digital Markets Act, which will also impact both Apple and Google to some higher degree than this South Korea law will. Apple historically doesn't do a lot of lobbying, but they're committing quite a bit of money and effort to trying to mitigate the effect on their App Store if (I think it's more when) this passes.
  • Reply 15 of 110
    I dunno ... looked to me like apps sold in South Korea could use their own payment systems - if and when Apple's lawyers fighting the legislation lose their case.

    Does anyone honestly believe that Apple South Korea won't fight this using local lawyers and laws?
    edited August 31 watto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 110
    hriw-annon@xs4all.nl[email protected] Posts: 45unconfirmed, member
    Maybe Apple will just start charging those that do not qualify for the small business program, those that make more than 1 million on the app store, a lot more for developer membership, and also for dev tools and app submissions. Apple hinted at this in the Epic trial. They will get their money one way or another, they prefer the system they have now.
    edited August 31 sireofsethwatto_cobraicoco3
  • Reply 17 of 110
    larryjwlarryjw Posts: 861member
    Apple and Google will need to support their app stores some way. There is a significant cost and effort involved. 

    And, the entire development platform is supported by the App Stores. It’s virtually free now. 

    I would not be surprised to see the consolidation (collapse) of most app companies. At best, their costs to use an outside App Store will be at least the cost they’re paying now to Apple. 

    At this point my guess is most apps out there are by hobbyists who have day jobs. It wasn’t that long ago there was pissing and moaning from the crowd for having to pay $99 a year for a developers license. 


    randominternetpersonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 110
    goofy1958 said:
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I

    100% agree. Pull the stores and leave South Korea scrambling until consumers rip the government a new one for trying to fix something that wasn’t broken. People retaliating against this legislation will prevent other countries from attempting to do the same. Allowing alternative stores opens up the platform to a world of hurt. There’s a reason I don’t use Android. I don’t want my experience as a consumer to be ruined or compromised because some clueless government bureaucrats half way around the world went on some bullshit self righteous crusade in seek of good press.
    Just because other app stores are allowed, doesn't mean that you have to download apps from them.  Stick with the Apple app store, and there is no change for you (or me).  I would never go to another app store other than Apple's, so not a big deal to me.  If people want to be stupid and download unknown apps from another site, that is on them, and one thing I really hope Apple does is have some sort of disclaimer that if you do, you may void your warranty.

    You make a fair case for consumer freedom. But you don't realize that corporations also have freedom to not be required to provide the software and services to allow for third party app stores. How would you like it if you sold lemonade on your street and were told by the government that you had to sell your neighbor's lemonade and give the profits of that lemonade to your neighbor? Apple works very hard and deserves the right to not have to share its app store profit with its competitors.
    Apple sells lemonade cups (iPhones and iPads).  All the kids (devs) in the neighborhood can sell flavors of lemonade(apps) but they have to pour it from the Apple pitcher (App Store) and Apple gets a cut of their sale.  L'il Bobby has his own pitcher and doesn't think he needs to use the Apple pitcher.  He can just pour his lemonade into the customers cup from his pitcher.  Apple says no.  Use my cup, you gotta use my pitcher.  
    ↑↑↑ That's a more apt description of the situation.   In this little story, most are still going to use the Apple pitcher because it's what they're used to using.  Bobby eventually brings his flavor of lemonade back to the Apple pitcher because not enough people stopped using the Apple pitcher for it to be profitable.
    I’m not sure Bobby will bring his flavor back to the Apple pitcher. This part:

    As well as blocking Apple and Google from exclusively using their own in-app payment systems, the new law will also ban them from unreasonably delaying or deleting apps.
    Perhaps I’m reading it wrong but that text seems to target only in-app purchases. So, Bobby can still offer his lemonade at Apple’s stand using his own pitcher but he can still charge customers for pouring into their cups and Apple gets nothing.

    It will be interesting to see how this is all handled by Apple and Google. It appears that, say, Epic can now list Fortnight on the App Store for free, pay nothing (except the $99/year dev fee) and get all their revenue via in-app purchases where they can use their own system and not pay Apple or Google anything. What will Apple and Google do to retain that revenue? It seems unlikely they will just start to shoulder the entire cost of running their respective stores at a loss.
    radarthekatsireofsethkurai_kagen2itivguywatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 110
    goofy1958 said:
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I

    100% agree. Pull the stores and leave South Korea scrambling until consumers rip the government a new one for trying to fix something that wasn’t broken. People retaliating against this legislation will prevent other countries from attempting to do the same. Allowing alternative stores opens up the platform to a world of hurt. There’s a reason I don’t use Android. I don’t want my experience as a consumer to be ruined or compromised because some clueless government bureaucrats half way around the world went on some bullshit self righteous crusade in seek of good press.
    Just because other app stores are allowed, doesn't mean that you have to download apps from them.  Stick with the Apple app store, and there is no change for you (or me).  I would never go to another app store other than Apple's, so not a big deal to me.  If people want to be stupid and download unknown apps from another site, that is on them, and one thing I really hope Apple does is have some sort of disclaimer that if you do, you may void your warranty.

    You make a fair case for consumer freedom. But you don't realize that corporations also have freedom to not be required to provide the software and services to allow for third party app stores. How would you like it if you sold lemonade on your street and were told by the government that you had to sell your neighbor's lemonade and give the profits of that lemonade to your neighbor? Apple works very hard and deserves the right to not have to share its app store profit with its competitors.
    Apple sells lemonade cups (iPhones and iPads).  All the kids (devs) in the neighborhood can sell flavors of lemonade(apps) but they have to pour it from the Apple pitcher (App Store) and Apple gets a cut of their sale.  L'il Bobby has his own pitcher and doesn't think he needs to use the Apple pitcher.  He can just pour his lemonade into the customers cup from his pitcher.  Apple says no.  Use my cup, you gotta use my pitcher.  
    ↑↑↑ That's a more apt description of the situation.   In this little story, most are still going to use the Apple pitcher because it's what they're used to using.  Bobby eventually brings his flavor of lemonade back to the Apple pitcher because not enough people stopped using the Apple pitcher for it to be profitable.
    It’s also possible that Bobby’s pitcher has knockoff apps of legitimate apps from Apple’s and more people flock to it because it’s free, (a real possibility). Those apps could have malicious code and now they get an easy entrance into the Apple cup. What now? Does Apple cover the cost if the malicious code damages the hardware? 
    Why would someone need to go to an alternative app store for knock off apps?  The App Store is filled with them.  Regarding malicious code, I covered that in an earlier comment.  #8 I think.
    goofy1958 said:
    aderutter said:
    This will have far reaching effects, so really hope Apple & Google simply pull the app-store from South Korea.
    I

    100% agree. Pull the stores and leave South Korea scrambling until consumers rip the government a new one for trying to fix something that wasn’t broken. People retaliating against this legislation will prevent other countries from attempting to do the same. Allowing alternative stores opens up the platform to a world of hurt. There’s a reason I don’t use Android. I don’t want my experience as a consumer to be ruined or compromised because some clueless government bureaucrats half way around the world went on some bullshit self righteous crusade in seek of good press.
    Just because other app stores are allowed, doesn't mean that you have to download apps from them.  Stick with the Apple app store, and there is no change for you (or me).  I would never go to another app store other than Apple's, so not a big deal to me.  If people want to be stupid and download unknown apps from another site, that is on them, and one thing I really hope Apple does is have some sort of disclaimer that if you do, you may void your warranty.

    You make a fair case for consumer freedom. But you don't realize that corporations also have freedom to not be required to provide the software and services to allow for third party app stores. How would you like it if you sold lemonade on your street and were told by the government that you had to sell your neighbor's lemonade and give the profits of that lemonade to your neighbor? Apple works very hard and deserves the right to not have to share its app store profit with its competitors.
    Apple sells lemonade cups (iPhones and iPads).  All the kids (devs) in the neighborhood can sell flavors of lemonade(apps) but they have to pour it from the Apple pitcher (App Store) and Apple gets a cut of their sale.  L'il Bobby has his own pitcher and doesn't think he needs to use the Apple pitcher.  He can just pour his lemonade into the customers cup from his pitcher.  Apple says no.  Use my cup, you gotta use my pitcher.  
    ↑↑↑ That's a more apt description of the situation.   In this little story, most are still going to use the Apple pitcher because it's what they're used to using.  Bobby eventually brings his flavor of lemonade back to the Apple pitcher because not enough people stopped using the Apple pitcher for it to be profitable.
    As far as I can see this is about payment, not AppStores. It’s like devs can have their users pay in the same way users can now pay for physical goods, like Uber rides, pizza, groceries. 


    From the article: 
    As expected, the South Korean plenary vote of the country's National Assembly has backed the Telecommunications Business Act. Apple and Google will no longer be able to require developers to sell apps via the App Store, and pay the companies' commission."
    muthuk_vanalingamelijahg
  • Reply 20 of 110
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 23,302member
    An interesting clip from an article at "The Information":

    "...Google Play generated $11.2 billion in revenue in 2019 and booked $7 billion in operating income. (Credit to Reuters’ Paresh Dave for working on a Saturday to report this.)That means the Play Store accounted for 20% of what Alphabet reported in operating income that year, a startlingly high number.

    Notably, such a proportion is in line with estimates of what Apple’s App Store contributes to the iPhone maker’s gargantuan profits. To be sure, the Apple number is far from confirmed. But the Google estimate comes from a group of states that conducted a nearly two year-long investigation into the company, so it seems likely to be reliable. It is telling that Google, and possibly Apple, get a fifth of their profits from parts of their businesses which the company’s don’t break out separately. The likely reason is that they know the sheer size of the profits are hard to defend."

    muthuk_vanalingamelijahg
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