Apple shareholder group urges a no vote on CEO Tim Cook's $99M pay package

24

Comments

  • Reply 21 of 67
    This article sure is confusing.

    It states this is a "proposed" $99 million package. Then, it says he received an $82 mil stock awards in 2021, and that is what the ISS has "significant concerns with". So which is it? What he already received, or what's proposed? Also, proposed for when? This says his 2021 payout was the first since 2011 — so a full decade ago. So is this $99m package for ten years from now? This year? ¯\(°_o)/¯  

    For those complaining about Cook's compensation, please see the pile of tens of billions of cash and securities that Apple is currently sitting on. This is a drop in the bucket.

    Cook is hardly a hoarder, dude works pretty much every waking hour as far as anyone can tell and has pledged to give away the bulk of his wealth.
    edited February 2022
  • Reply 22 of 67
    Xed said:
    All things Apple seem to have become incredibly more complex, not the least is dealing with the now annual macOS releases since 2011.
    The loss of 32 bit app support (Windows does) has been a particular concern (cost/workflow/training) for this life time customer...

    Is the mac still 'a computer for the rest of us…?'
    You're upset that Apple got rid of 32-bit processors and eventually stopped supporting 32-bit architecture? Are you also upset that they did the same for 16-bit and moved to a Unix-like OS?
    To be fair other than expanded memory access and possibly speed I don't understand further benefits of 64 bit, but when apps I license & use no longer work, it matters...

    I'd like to have the option to upgrade on merit or need. Kind of like onboard RAM and storage that means throwing out the baby with the bath water. Is that why $99M is available to a single human...?

    When I search under about this mac I get over 400 hits on 32 bit apps, and more major considerations include losing things like an Adobe Master Collection, which isn't even available for upgrade with a persistent license option, effectively forcing a choice of subscription or abandonment.  

    Even for Acrobat Pro (still available persistent) Adobe wants $450 USD (no upgrade beyond 2 years) while my current version keeps happily doing what is needed with no complaints. At what point are customers being held to ransom...? It certainly feels that way at times, although I assume it serves the developers well, including $99M compensation for a single human... Is that better...?

    I still have a G4 powerbook that runs (for now) including 'Classic' and an entire life's work on the mac... iWeb is another app that I really like, and think is some of the best 'no manual required' intuitive software to ever come from the Steve Jobs era...  32 bit, of course...
    The solution is staring you right in the face — keep living in the past and keep using old software and an old Mac until you die. Let the rest of us move on with technology. Cook's compensation is irrelevant to any of your concerns.
    stompymacxpress
  • Reply 23 of 67
    JFC_PAJFC_PA Posts: 865member
    My portfolio balance strongly disagrees. Thanks Tim!
    Bosafastasleepbadmonk
  • Reply 24 of 67
    AppleZuluAppleZulu Posts: 1,512member
    Xed said:
    All things Apple seem to have become incredibly more complex, not the least is dealing with the now annual macOS releases since 2011.
    The loss of 32 bit app support (Windows does) has been a particular concern (cost/workflow/training) for this life time customer...

    Is the mac still 'a computer for the rest of us…?'
    You're upset that Apple got rid of 32-bit processors and eventually stopped supporting 32-bit architecture? Are you also upset that they did the same for 16-bit and moved to a Unix-like OS?
    To be fair other than expanded memory access and possibly speed I don't understand further benefits of 64 bit, but when apps I license & use no longer work, it matters...

    I'd like to have the option to upgrade on merit or need. Kind of like onboard RAM and storage that means throwing out the baby with the bath water. Is that why $99M is available to a single human...?

    When I search under about this mac I get over 400 hits on 32 bit apps, and more major considerations include losing things like an Adobe Master Collection, which isn't even available for upgrade with a persistent license option, effectively forcing a choice of subscription or abandonment.  

    Even for Acrobat Pro (still available persistent) Adobe wants $450 USD (no upgrade beyond 2 years) while my current version keeps happily doing what is needed with no complaints. At what point are customers being held to ransom...? It certainly feels that way at times, although I assume it serves the developers well, including $99M compensation for a single human... Is that better...?

    I still have a G4 powerbook that runs (for now) including 'Classic' and an entire life's work on the mac... iWeb is another app that I really like, and think is some of the best 'no manual required' intuitive software to ever come from the Steve Jobs era...  32 bit, of course...
    You can keep driving a Model T as long as you like, but that doesn’t obligate Ford to limit its new cars to 1920s technology. In fact, you probably ought to prepare yourself now for the not-too-distant future when gasoline will not only be very expensive, but gas stations will be harder and harder to find. When it starts to happen it will do so quickly. There will be a tipping point where operating and maintaining those pipelines for distribution of gasoline will cost more than they earn and that, as they say, will be that. 
    fastasleepstompy
  • Reply 25 of 67
    mac_dogmac_dog Posts: 1,023member
    TBH, how much money does a person need? I say vote no. Tim should do the ethically right thing and turn this down. I see clients on the brink of homelessness eating moldy danishes. To me, it’s obscene. 
    colt033
  • Reply 26 of 67
    mjtomlinmjtomlin Posts: 2,590member
    mac_dog said:
    TBH, how much money does a person need? I say vote no. Tim should do the ethically right thing and turn this down. I see clients on the brink of homelessness eating moldy danishes. To me, it’s obscene. 

    Tim Cook saying no is going to help them? How about Tim Cook saying Yes and donating that money to a worthy cause that might actually help people?
    badmonkfastasleep
  • Reply 27 of 67
    Xed said:
    All things Apple seem to have become incredibly more complex, not the least is dealing with the now annual macOS releases since 2011.
    The loss of 32 bit app support (Windows does) has been a particular concern (cost/workflow/training) for this life time customer...

    Is the mac still 'a computer for the rest of us…?'
    You're upset that Apple got rid of 32-bit processors and eventually stopped supporting 32-bit architecture? Are you also upset that they did the same for 16-bit and moved to a Unix-like OS?
    To be fair other than expanded memory access and possibly speed I don't understand further benefits of 64 bit, but when apps I license & use no longer work, it matters...

    I'd like to have the option to upgrade on merit or need. Kind of like onboard RAM and storage that means throwing out the baby with the bath water. Is that why $99M is available to a single human...?

    When I search under about this mac I get over 400 hits on 32 bit apps, and more major considerations include losing things like an Adobe Master Collection, which isn't even available for upgrade with a persistent license option, effectively forcing a choice of subscription or abandonment.  

    Even for Acrobat Pro (still available persistent) Adobe wants $450 USD (no upgrade beyond 2 years) while my current version keeps happily doing what is needed with no complaints. At what point are customers being held to ransom...? It certainly feels that way at times, although I assume it serves the developers well, including $99M compensation for a single human... Is that better...?

    I still have a G4 powerbook that runs (for now) including 'Classic' and an entire life's work on the mac... iWeb is another app that I really like, and think is some of the best 'no manual required' intuitive software to ever come from the Steve Jobs era...  32 bit, of course...
    The solution is staring you right in the face — keep living in the past and keep using old software and an old Mac until you die. Let the rest of us move on with technology. Cook's compensation is irrelevant to any of your concerns.
    Well with respect I might suggest we must agree to disagree... I ask if the whole point of orphaning perfectly fuctional software, in cases easier and better designed than 'upgrades' is to feather pockets of vested interests, especially once a gold rush of transition has occurred...

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embrace,_extend,_and_extinguish
    JWSC
  • Reply 28 of 67
    sflocal said:
    BS.. bunch of Losers crying like Jealous   kids.. 

    He earned Every Penny!!!!!
    Did you not even read the "shareholder" word in the headline?  These are AAPL investors that most likely made out big on AAPL.  Jeez.
    Shareholders can be jealous kid losers!!
  • Reply 29 of 67
    XedXed Posts: 1,601member
    Xed said:
    All things Apple seem to have become incredibly more complex, not the least is dealing with the now annual macOS releases since 2011.
    The loss of 32 bit app support (Windows does) has been a particular concern (cost/workflow/training) for this life time customer...

    Is the mac still 'a computer for the rest of us…?'
    You're upset that Apple got rid of 32-bit processors and eventually stopped supporting 32-bit architecture? Are you also upset that they did the same for 16-bit and moved to a Unix-like OS?
    To be fair other than expanded memory access and possibly speed I don't understand further benefits of 64 bit, but when apps I license & use no longer work, it matters...

    I'd like to have the option to upgrade on merit or need. Kind of like onboard RAM and storage that means throwing out the baby with the bath water. Is that why $99M is available to a single human...?

    When I search under about this mac I get over 400 hits on 32 bit apps, and more major considerations include losing things like an Adobe Master Collection, which isn't even available for upgrade with a persistent license option, effectively forcing a choice of subscription or abandonment.  

    Even for Acrobat Pro (still available persistent) Adobe wants $450 USD (no upgrade beyond 2 years) while my current version keeps happily doing what is needed with no complaints. At what point are customers being held to ransom...? It certainly feels that way at times, although I assume it serves the developers well, including $99M compensation for a single human... Is that better...?

    I still have a G4 powerbook that runs (for now) including 'Classic' and an entire life's work on the mac... iWeb is another app that I really like, and think is some of the best 'no manual required' intuitive software to ever come from the Steve Jobs era...  32 bit, of course…
    1) Yes, performance and capacity are the key benefits.

    2) I'm sure having to deal with a SW vendor that is too lazy, cheap, and/or incompetent to update their SW is an issue for you, but you don't have to get a 64-bit PC. There are still plenty of 32-bit machines running antiquated SW for this very reason.

    3) You do have the option as to whether you want to upgrade. 

    4a) I find it unfortunate that you see Apple's HW moves as solely about forcing you to buy a new Mac and not about the ability to make better and faster HW. LPDDR5 RAM on my M1 Max is amazing. Apple making their own CPUs is amazing. Their read and write speeds are amazing. It's simply a better performing device because every single component isn't socketed. If it's not your thing they you simply don't buy a Mac or, as you already stated which I find more perplexing for your argument, you simply keep your old Mac

    4b) Your remarks remind me of when Apple removed the optical disc drive. People were upset by this even though it was taking up a massive amount of internal space, used a lot of power, made noise, and was slow compared to built-in storage. We were fully into the WiFi era then. "How am I going to get SW on my Mac now?" and "My vendor only sends CDs/DVDs for me to use!", were common complaints. Never mind that they, too, could keep their (then) current Mac, use an external drive, and that vendors would eventfully offer downloads (most before it ever became an issue for them), it was a common complaint that Apple no longer made "a computer for the rest of us." I'm guessing the move from 16-bit to 32-bit also had people making simpler complaints.

    5) That sounds like an issue with Adobe's abusive licensing to me.
    bestkeptsecretstompy
  • Reply 30 of 67

    AppleZulu said:
    Xed said:
    All things Apple seem to have become incredibly more complex, not the least is dealing with the now annual macOS releases since 2011.
    The loss of 32 bit app support (Windows does) has been a particular concern (cost/workflow/training) for this life time customer...

    Is the mac still 'a computer for the rest of us…?'
    You're upset that Apple got rid of 32-bit processors and eventually stopped supporting 32-bit architecture? Are you also upset that they did the same for 16-bit and moved to a Unix-like OS?
    To be fair other than expanded memory access and possibly speed I don't understand further benefits of 64 bit, but when apps I license & use no longer work, it matters...

    I'd like to have the option to upgrade on merit or need. Kind of like onboard RAM and storage that means throwing out the baby with the bath water. Is that why $99M is available to a single human...?

    When I search under about this mac I get over 400 hits on 32 bit apps, and more major considerations include losing things like an Adobe Master Collection, which isn't even available for upgrade with a persistent license option, effectively forcing a choice of subscription or abandonment.  

    Even for Acrobat Pro (still available persistent) Adobe wants $450 USD (no upgrade beyond 2 years) while my current version keeps happily doing what is needed with no complaints. At what point are customers being held to ransom...? It certainly feels that way at times, although I assume it serves the developers well, including $99M compensation for a single human... Is that better...?

    I still have a G4 powerbook that runs (for now) including 'Classic' and an entire life's work on the mac... iWeb is another app that I really like, and think is some of the best 'no manual required' intuitive software to ever come from the Steve Jobs era...  32 bit, of course...
    You can keep driving a Model T as long as you like, but that doesn’t obligate Ford to limit its new cars to 1920s technology. In fact, you probably ought to prepare yourself now for the not-too-distant future when gasoline will not only be very expensive, but gas stations will be harder and harder to find. When it starts to happen it will do so quickly. There will be a tipping point where operating and maintaining those pipelines for distribution of gasoline will cost more than they earn and that, as they say, will be that. 
    Is there irony in your comparison...? How many developers anticipate to live within a sustainable development/support footprint in perpetuity...?  

    Is it in fact the basis of concern about a sustainable realm for developers, hardware, software and (gasp) customers in a world at large needing to abandon perfectly good functionality that becomes simply unprofitable to support a 'progress for profit' zeitgeist ?

    Has Apple adopted an embrace, extend, <harvest>, extinguish approach since 2011 ?
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embrace,_extend,_and_extinguish
    edited February 2022
  • Reply 31 of 67
    mac_dog said:
    TBH, how much money does a person need? I say vote no. Tim should do the ethically right thing and turn this down. I see clients on the brink of homelessness eating moldy danishes. To me, it’s obscene. 
    Explain how Apple paying its top leadership somehow takes money away from your clients. Now extrapolate that to the fact Cook has pledged to give away the bulk of his wealth to charity, and what Apple would do with it if it had simply kept the money, because shareholders voted no. Guessing you never took logic 101 in school, so this will be a good exercise.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_dilemma

  • Reply 32 of 67
    y2any2an Posts: 145member
    Comparable companies? Lol
    edited February 2022
  • Reply 33 of 67
    Xed said:
    All things Apple seem to have become incredibly more complex, not the least is dealing with the now annual macOS releases since 2011.
    The loss of 32 bit app support (Windows does) has been a particular concern (cost/workflow/training) for this life time customer...

    Is the mac still 'a computer for the rest of us…?'
    You're upset that Apple got rid of 32-bit processors and eventually stopped supporting 32-bit architecture? Are you also upset that they did the same for 16-bit and moved to a Unix-like OS?
    To be fair other than expanded memory access and possibly speed I don't understand further benefits of 64 bit, but when apps I license & use no longer work, it matters...

    I'd like to have the option to upgrade on merit or need. Kind of like onboard RAM and storage that means throwing out the baby with the bath water. Is that why $99M is available to a single human...?

    When I search under about this mac I get over 400 hits on 32 bit apps, and more major considerations include losing things like an Adobe Master Collection, which isn't even available for upgrade with a persistent license option, effectively forcing a choice of subscription or abandonment.  

    Even for Acrobat Pro (still available persistent) Adobe wants $450 USD (no upgrade beyond 2 years) while my current version keeps happily doing what is needed with no complaints. At what point are customers being held to ransom...? It certainly feels that way at times, although I assume it serves the developers well, including $99M compensation for a single human... Is that better...?

    I still have a G4 powerbook that runs (for now) including 'Classic' and an entire life's work on the mac... iWeb is another app that I really like, and think is some of the best 'no manual required' intuitive software to ever come from the Steve Jobs era...  32 bit, of course...
    The solution is staring you right in the face — keep living in the past and keep using old software and an old Mac until you die. Let the rest of us move on with technology. Cook's compensation is irrelevant to any of your concerns.
    Well with respect I might suggest we must agree to disagree... I ask if the whole point of orphaning perfectly fuctional software, in cases easier and better designed than 'upgrades' is to feather pockets of vested interests, especially once a gold rush of transition has occurred...

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embrace,_extend,_and_extinguish
    The point is to improve on technology. The premise that it's not an improvement false, despite the fact that you're perfectly happy to cling to old tech. I guarantee that you cannot build a functional modern, responsive website in iWeb. Adobe Creative Suite was a decade ago! Do you have any idea how outdated most of that software is? Just because you find functionality in ancient software doesn't mean the rest of the world should be held back in the dark ages with you. Nobody is stopping you from simply using an old Mac to run old Mac software. Do it. Smarter people have already found modern equivalent tools which are far cheaper, faster, and better than decade-old Creative Suite software and iWeb.
    stompy
  • Reply 34 of 67
    This is a great way to lose Tim as CEO of Apple. Go ahead and do it, then watch your investments to to mudd.
  • Reply 35 of 67
    XedXed Posts: 1,601member
    Fred257 said:
    This is a great way to lose Tim as CEO of Apple. Go ahead and do it, then watch your investments to to mudd.
    I wonder how much the stock will drop when Cook finally says he's resigning.
  • Reply 36 of 67
    Xed said:
    All things Apple seem to have become incredibly more complex, not the least is dealing with the now annual macOS releases since 2011.
    The loss of 32 bit app support (Windows does) has been a particular concern (cost/workflow/training) for this life time customer...

    Is the mac still 'a computer for the rest of us…?'
    You're upset that Apple got rid of 32-bit processors and eventually stopped supporting 32-bit architecture? Are you also upset that they did the same for 16-bit and moved to a Unix-like OS?
    To be fair other than expanded memory access and possibly speed I don't understand further benefits of 64 bit, but when apps I license & use no longer work, it matters...

    I'd like to have the option to upgrade on merit or need. Kind of like onboard RAM and storage that means throwing out the baby with the bath water. Is that why $99M is available to a single human...?

    When I search under about this mac I get over 400 hits on 32 bit apps, and more major considerations include losing things like an Adobe Master Collection, which isn't even available for upgrade with a persistent license option, effectively forcing a choice of subscription or abandonment.  

    Even for Acrobat Pro (still available persistent) Adobe wants $450 USD (no upgrade beyond 2 years) while my current version keeps happily doing what is needed with no complaints. At what point are customers being held to ransom...? It certainly feels that way at times, although I assume it serves the developers well, including $99M compensation for a single human... Is that better...?

    I still have a G4 powerbook that runs (for now) including 'Classic' and an entire life's work on the mac... iWeb is another app that I really like, and think is some of the best 'no manual required' intuitive software to ever come from the Steve Jobs era...  32 bit, of course...
    The solution is staring you right in the face — keep living in the past and keep using old software and an old Mac until you die. Let the rest of us move on with technology. Cook's compensation is irrelevant to any of your concerns.
    Well with respect I might suggest we must agree to disagree... I ask if the whole point of orphaning perfectly fuctional software, in cases easier and better designed than 'upgrades' is to feather pockets of vested interests, especially once a gold rush of transition has occurred...

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embrace,_extend,_and_extinguish
    The point is to improve on technology. The premise that it's not an improvement false, despite the fact that you're perfectly happy to cling to old tech. I guarantee that you cannot build a functional modern, responsive website in iWeb. Adobe Creative Suite was a decade ago! Do you have any idea how outdated most of that software is? Just because you find functionality in ancient software doesn't mean the rest of the world should be held back in the dark ages with you. Nobody is stopping you from simply using an old Mac to run old Mac software. Do it. Smarter people have already found modern equivalent tools which are far cheaper, faster, and better than decade-old Creative Suite software and iWeb.
    Again with respect please define improve...

    I spent many hours looking at alternatives for web authoring... I would be happy to embrace any options that might be "modern equivalent tools which are far cheaper, faster, and better than decade-old Creative Suite software and iWeb"...

    Please keep in mind that data harvesting or otherwise questionable 'free' options suggest evaluation in a full disclosure context...
    edited February 2022 JWSC
  • Reply 37 of 67

    Xed said:
    Fred257 said:
    This is a great way to lose Tim as CEO of Apple. Go ahead and do it, then watch your investments to to mudd.
    I wonder how much the stock will drop when Cook finally says he's resigning.
    is that the rub - does Mr Cook primarily serve customers or shareholders ?
    edited February 2022
  • Reply 38 of 67
    XedXed Posts: 1,601member

    Xed said:
    Fred257 said:
    This is a great way to lose Tim as CEO of Apple. Go ahead and do it, then watch your investments to to mudd.
    I wonder how much the stock will drop when Cook finally says he's resigning.
    is that the rub - does Mr Cook primarily serve customers or shareholders ?
    Huh? Cook serves Apple. Apple serves customers and shareholders. Additionally, Apple's profit and cost centers, patents, vendors, and on and on serve Apple. If something changes the stock can be affected. In fact, it likely will be if it's a severe enough hiccup. Pandemic caused a drop. Tsunamis have caused a drop. Change in rank, new laws, bad press, etc.
    fastasleep
  • Reply 39 of 67
    Xed said:

    Xed said:
    Fred257 said:
    This is a great way to lose Tim as CEO of Apple. Go ahead and do it, then watch your investments to to mudd.
    I wonder how much the stock will drop when Cook finally says he's resigning.
    is that the rub - does Mr Cook primarily serve customers or shareholders ?
    Huh? Cook serves Apple. Apple serves customers and shareholders. Additionally, Apple's profit and cost centers, patents, vendors, and on and on serve Apple. If something changes the stock can be affected. In fact, it likely will be if it's a severe enough hiccup. Pandemic caused a drop. Tsunamis have caused a drop. Change in rank, new laws, bad press, etc.
    ...CSAM seemed to provoke a reaction even here... ...will we find out soon enough what Apple may be intending to do with iCloud data...?
  • Reply 40 of 67
    Anyone who would want to be paid this much has no moral worth and is totally delusional about their own contribution. He's a lucky guy who ended up running a very rich corporation. Literally anyone could do the job just as well.
Sign In or Register to comment.