Apple AR, VR operating system now called 'xrOS'

Posted:
in General Discussion edited December 2022
Apple has reportedly changed the name of its mixed-reality operating system to "xrOS," signaling that the company may be close to releasing a mixed-reality headset.




Apple's "realityOS," the suspected operating system for its dedicated AR and VR platform, has potentially been renamed to "xrOS."

According to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman, Apple may release its combination AR/VR headset as early as next year.

Apple has been rumored to be working on an Apple VR or AR headset for quite some time, and that hardware needs to run its own operating system.

The "XR" is shorthand for "extended reality," which covers both virtual and augmented reality.

Details of a dedicated operating system for the headset date back to 2017, with a report claiming Apple's headset would have its own display and processor, as well as a new operating system. At the time, that software was called "rOS."

Apple is said to be working on at least three headsets of the AR and VR variety. They are apparently under the codes "N301," "N421," and "N602."

The N301 is said to be the "Apple Reality Pro," a name for the headset that surfaced in trademark filings in late August. That headset is expected to be a mixed reality model that will take on the Meta Quest Pro, with a potential launch in 2023.

The N602 will apparently be the second-generation release, which will offer two variants to consumers. One will provide upgrades over the first model, while the other will be a lower-cost alternative.

The third, N421, is rumored to be less of a headset and closer to the idea of Apple Glass smart glasses.

Currently anticipated to be in an "advanced" stage of development, Apple's first headset launch could include a pair of 4K OLED displays, 15 camera modules dotted around the outside, and potential support for eye tracking and hand gestures. The first wave could also be an expensive headset, with prices up to $3,000 proposed.

Read on AppleInsider
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 22
    22july201322july2013 Posts: 3,219member
    Did Apple register "xrOS" at any trademark office?
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 22
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,063member
    X-ray vision at last!
    mdwwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 22
    JP234JP234 Posts: 789member
    You have to know, no matter how immersive and impressive the experience is, you're still going to look like a dweeb wearing any of these headsets. Pass

  • Reply 4 of 22
    thttht Posts: 4,722member
    "ten ros"?

    "tenor oh ess"?

    "ex ross"?

    "zer ros"?

    If "xr" kind of pronounced like in "draw" where the "d" is really "j" sound. So, "jross"?

    "zeros"?


  • Reply 5 of 22
    JapheyJaphey Posts: 1,463member
    JP234 said:
    You have to know, no matter how immersive and impressive the experience is, you're still going to look like a dweeb wearing any of these headsets. Pass

    That’s what they said about AirPods at first, now even insecure people can wear them without fear of what random strangers think. But cool, one less person in line.
    gregoriusmblastdoorbeowulfschmidtwatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 22
    JP234JP234 Posts: 789member
    Japhey said:
    JP234 said:
    You have to know, no matter how immersive and impressive the experience is, you're still going to look like a dweeb wearing any of these headsets. Pass

    That’s what they said about AirPods at first, now even insecure people can wear them without fear of what random strangers think. But cool, one less person in line.
    I can't wait until the first dweeb walks into traffic while searching for unobtainium on Pandora.
  • Reply 7 of 22
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,774member
    I sort of understand these headsets/glasses thingies are important in interesting to gamers. I'm not a gamer, so I can't really imagine a use for these device for myself. YMMV.

    However, the "mixed" reality mention in this article helped me connect the dots (!) a bit: a VR device might (might) be an interesting add-on to watching a sports event, even on a HDTV; or possibly even live. I thing there was a recent report regarding the NFL sunday ticket contract negotiations that might point to Apple wanting to do this. 

    I'm just struggling to figure out what these things are for. Guess I lack imagination. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 22
    Doubtful that any of the headset style designs go anywhere. The glasses will get the nod. 

    Apple doesn’t like to do “nerd” for nerds sake. It makes products that enhance life, not remove people from it. Apple also makes things stylish. Headsets never will be “in style.” Glasses on the other hand, can have gone in and out of style constantly. 

    Take headphones. In the 70s, big earphones that covered your head were all the rage. By the 90s they were completely out of style. Enter the Beats era and they are somewhat cool again. Apple took ear phones and made them iconic with earbuds. Then did it again with AirPods. 

    If anyone can do this right it’s apple. But it won’t be a bucket strapped to your head. 
    rmusikantowwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 22
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 2,918member
    JP234 said:
    You have to know, no matter how immersive and impressive the experience is, you're still going to look like a dweeb wearing any of these headsets. Pass

    I already look like a dweeb, so sign me up!
    beowulfschmidtJP234watto_cobraJaphey
  • Reply 10 of 22
    eightzero said:
    I sort of understand these headsets/glasses thingies are important in interesting to gamers. I'm not a gamer, so I can't really imagine a use for these device for myself. YMMV.

    However, the "mixed" reality mention in this article helped me connect the dots (!) a bit: a VR device might (might) be an interesting add-on to watching a sports event, even on a HDTV; or possibly even live. I thing there was a recent report regarding the NFL sunday ticket contract negotiations that might point to Apple wanting to do this. 

    I'm just struggling to figure out what these things are for. Guess I lack imagination. 

    There are a few non-gaming related uses for each of the varieties of XR.  There have been PTSD and phobia patients who've been helped by virtual reality therapy sessions.  Augmented reality can be of use when performing tasks with which one is unfamiliar, or when more information is needed that can be discerned simply by looking.  Think of watching a YouTube video of how to, for instance, install a new headlamp in a modern care, and how much easier that might be if information were overlaid on the actual scene in front of you, instead of having to look away and orient a screen.

    As the technology improves, more use cases will become feasible, and while a future such as Ready Player One is pretty dystopian, there are some pretty desirable applications for advanced XR technology.
    rmusikantowwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 22
    One possible reason Apple may be opting to use xrOS is to avoid confusion with ROS - the well established open source framework for Robotics. 
    rmusikantowwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 22
    JP234JP234 Posts: 789member
    Hate to say it, but AR/VR headsets and glasses may already be on the way to obsolescence. Elon is pimping his newfangled brain implant called "Neuralink."

    I don't know about y'all, but I can hardly wait to have a chip designed by Elon Musk implanted into my brain! What could go wrong? (Battery replacement gonna be a bitch, though…). In all honesty, I think it's intended for people with paralytic spine injuries, or blindness.
    watto_cobratenthousandthings
  • Reply 13 of 22
    JP234 said:
    You have to know, no matter how immersive and impressive the experience is, you're still going to look like a dweeb wearing any of these headsets. Pass

    If it's VR, you won't be walking around with these, but rather watching at home.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 22

    The key to success will be content. I don't play games so not interested in that. However, I would be interested in short 15minutes to half hour movies and documentaries specifically made for immersive VR experiences.
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 22
    AR headsets are more suited for gamers IMO.  But you look like a nerd. More practical would be Apple glasses. If done right this could have potentially useable features like navigation, notifications, siri build in etc. 
  • Reply 16 of 22
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 2,774member
    eightzero said:
    I sort of understand these headsets/glasses thingies are important in interesting to gamers. I'm not a gamer, so I can't really imagine a use for these device for myself. YMMV.

    However, the "mixed" reality mention in this article helped me connect the dots (!) a bit: a VR device might (might) be an interesting add-on to watching a sports event, even on a HDTV; or possibly even live. I thing there was a recent report regarding the NFL sunday ticket contract negotiations that might point to Apple wanting to do this. 

    I'm just struggling to figure out what these things are for. Guess I lack imagination. 

    There are a few non-gaming related uses for each of the varieties of XR.  There have been PTSD and phobia patients who've been helped by virtual reality therapy sessions.  Augmented reality can be of use when performing tasks with which one is unfamiliar, or when more information is needed that can be discerned simply by looking.  Think of watching a YouTube video of how to, for instance, install a new headlamp in a modern care, and how much easier that might be if information were overlaid on the actual scene in front of you, instead of having to look away and orient a screen.

    As the technology improves, more use cases will become feasible, and while a future such as Ready Player One is pretty dystopian, there are some pretty desirable applications for advanced XR technology.
    Sure. But are those desirable application enough to justify designing, making, and supporting this commercial product? Is Apple really going to sell million, tens of millions of them to even recover the costs of investment, much less make profit? I'm just not comprehending the economics. 
  • Reply 17 of 22
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 6,515member

    The key to success will be content. I don't play games so not interested in that. However, I would be interested in short 15minutes to half hour movies and documentaries specifically made for immersive VR experiences.
    Yes. Content is what it is all about.

    Just like maps and search, data is everything (as is keeping it up to date).

    The other problem, which is far more problematic is shifting the data around and processing it. We are talking about huge amounts of data and compute power if the units are going to have sensing abilities. 

    However, the low hanging fruit is the HUD aspect of simply displaying content and allowing you to see the outside world. 

    Of course, weight, bulk and battery life are also important but data content availability is where the real magic will be. 

    The use cases are enormous. 


  • Reply 18 of 22
    I think Apple will push the education approach to AR with a focus on health. Much larger market than gaming but still be an option to developers. 
    Whatever they make will be expensive and not in schools anytime soon but I can’t think how cool it would of been to have some AR experiences instead of cutting up bugs or animals in my classes. Looking at buildings designs or 3D anything right in front of you has infinite possibilities. 





  • Reply 19 of 22
    JP234JP234 Posts: 789member
    JP234 said:
    You have to know, no matter how immersive and impressive the experience is, you're still going to look like a dweeb wearing any of these headsets. Pass

    If it's VR, you won't be walking around with these, but rather watching at home.
    Want to bet on that? There will be people DRIVING while wearing them. Count on it.
  • Reply 20 of 22
    mattinozmattinoz Posts: 1,980member
    toganl said:
    I think Apple will push the education approach to AR with a focus on health. Much larger market than gaming but still be an option to developers. 
    Whatever they make will be expensive and not in schools anytime soon but I can’t think how cool it would of been to have some AR experiences instead of cutting up bugs or animals in my classes. Looking at buildings designs or 3D anything right in front of you has infinite possibilities. 





    Yep if good hardware gamers will pay but Apple wants professional markets who will have the equipment brought for them out of the saving they hope to get. 

    Professional training space would seem to be a big market but what is needed is devices that can see the user interact with physical item controls then fill in the blanks.

    X-Plane are doing a big push into professional pilot training and certification next year a device that would be a big gain in aircraft sims breaking the need to have lots of immersive screens around physical controls or the current VR headset that make having "real controls" problematic. Those sorts of Hybrid AR environments have many many uses.


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