EcoFlow Advanced Kit review: Power your whole house with batteries

Posted:
in General Discussion edited May 2023
Batteries are replacing gasoline in not only cars but now generators. The EcoFlow Advanced Kit -- comprised of two individual EcoFlow Delta Pros -- is a prime example of the future of generator power.

EcoFlow Delta Pro unit for Advanced Kit
EcoFlow Delta Pro unit for Advanced Kit


The Advanced Kit is a safer and more efficient energy option for when a blackout happens, and you need power fast.

While the EcoFlow Advanced Kit may be more powerful and coherent than a regular generator, it comes with a more robust price tag alongside it.

EcoFlow Delta Pro design

The EcoFlow Delta Pro -- the power factor of the EcoFlow Advanced Kit -- is built within a 25x11.2x16.4 inch box-shaped design with two wheels on the back and an LCD screen on the front that takes up about one-third of the front panel.

The whole design replicates the look of a massive battery, and essentially, that's what it is.

A button on the bottom of the front will release a handle for you to pull the 99-pound Delta Pro. This handle is handy when transporting the unit from one spot to another.

While it may look like it cannot withstand the weight, the handle is extremely sturdy.

Handle bar for EcoFlow Delta Pro
Handle bar for EcoFlow Delta Pro


Two handles at the top come in use when picking up the unit, but unless 100 pounds is easy for you to carry, it is suggested that you and one other person take one of the handles and lift the Delta Pro together.

The LCD screen presents huge digital numbers that are easy to read and simple to understand when wanting to know how much battery is left or how much power is being used.

Specifically, the battery percentage converted to the number of days left is showcased on the left. The battery percentage is in the middle (surrounded by a corresponding battery-level ring). The power input and output status are on the right side of the screen.

Front information panel and ports
Front information panel and ports


Underneath the screen are the ports you can plug your devices into to charge. Two USB-A ports can output up to 12W of max power; the other two support fast charging of up to 18W, and two USB-C ports can hit speeds up to 100W.

A power button is located in the middle of the USB-C ports. Press it once to turn on the Delta Pro, and hold it down for three seconds to turn it off. It's like operating a television, which beats repeatedly injuring your arm by tugging on a ripcord.

Below the ports are four power outlets that can output a max of 20A and an XD-010 port that can discharge power of up to 30A. A power button for them is located above the outlets.

Power outlets located on the front
Power outlets located on the front


On the back are an 11-150V DC port (used for solar or car charging) and a 100-240V AC port that both output a max of 15A. A speed switch in the middle allows you to make charging speeds faster or slower for connected devices.

Next to the ports is a switch that protects the power station from overloading.

Rear ports of EcoFlow Delta Pro
Rear ports of EcoFlow Delta Pro


Underneath the ports are two shielded outlets that allow you to plug in additional batteries -- sold separately -- to prolong the battery life of the Delta Pro.

A panel on the lower right side connects the unit to your phone through Bluetooth or WiFi, a Bluetooth standby switch, a remote control (sold separately) port, and an IOT reset button. An infinity port, 12V DC power button, and Anderson port -- which can output a max of up to 378W -- can also be found in the exact location.

Inside the Delta Pro is a 3.6kWh capacity battery made from LFP (lithium iron phosphate) and has a cycle life of 6,500 when up to 50% capacity or 3,500 cycles when up to 80%.

EcoFlow Delta Pro functionality

The EcoFlow Delta Pro -- one half of the Advanced Kit -- offers much solid power alone and can be transported with you on trips as well.

With a 3,600Wh battery inside, the Delta Pro can last up to one day and output 12V of power. It can be fully charged in roughly 2.7 hours -- which is good statistically since you get nearly 12x the amount of usage out of the power station.

Port to add additional battery
Port to add additional battery


How fast the battery drains obviously depends on how many appliances you have running on the unit. There is a slight overhead, as always, but it isn't bad.

To charge the Delta Pro, plug the charging cord into the X-Stream charging input port on the back and then plug the prongs into a regular wall outlet. You can also charge it with the included car cigarette lighter adapter.

Charging speeds are up to 1800W max, and 12V car charging speeds are also included.

The Delta Pro can be taken nearly anywhere you go -- especially to areas where power outlets may not be accessible. While the unit can charge from a cigarette lighter in the car, it can also be recharged through the Infinity port on the side at electric vehicle charging stations.

Port to charge Delta Pro at EV charging station and connect to Advanced Kit
Port to charge Delta Pro at EV charging station and connect to Advanced Kit


Charging the Delta Pro at an electric vehicle charging station is very beneficial -- especially in the case of a natural disaster that can cause a widespread blackout. Then, while everyone is waiting in long gas lines, you can skip the line and go straight to an EV charging station to fill up your electronic generator.

Unlike a traditional generator that would make a bunch of noise when running and stink up the surrounding area with the smell of gasoline, the Delta Pro runs quietly with only the sound of the fans running to keep the battery cool.

The noise levels can be compared to a laptop fan running at high speeds, so you won't hear your power stations at all if you have them in the garage or downstairs. It usually runs at a temperature of around 68-86 degrees Fahrenheit.

Due to the Delta Pro being powered by batteries instead of gasoline, it is safe to have them inside your house while running. This eliminates the fear of your generator being stolen if left outside at night or needing to refill it multiple times in bad weather.

EcoFlow Advanced Kit functionality

While the Delta Pro is powerful, pairing two together to assemble the EcoFlow Advanced Kit creates a powerhouse strong enough to power your whole house.

Advanced Kit consisting of two Delta Pros
Advanced Kit consisting of two Delta Pros


When purchasing the Advanced Kit, you will receive the Double Voltage Hub, which connects both Delta Pros to make them one power unit. Plugging the two units into the hub is like plugging a cable into an outlet; it is effortless.

You then connect the adapter cable to the infinity port -- the same port you would use to charge the Delta Pro at an EV charging station.

Double Voltage Hub
Double Voltage Hub


The Advanced Kit has a 21.6 kilowatt-hour capacity (kWh) versus 7.2 kWh and can deliver 240V. When actively running, it can give you up to one week of delivered energy to your home, depending on load.

You can fully recharge the whole unit in under 6 hours (5.4 hours, to be exact). This is an excellent turnaround for a battery that can last you a week before having to be recharged.

Unlike the singular Delta Pro, the Advanced Kit is made to fully power your home, from refrigerators to lights, to your washer and dryer.

To have the Advanced Kit power your home, you need to connect it to a power inlet box that houses all of your power switches for the electricity zones in your house.

Connection to intel box and power switches
Connection to inlet box and power switches


Once the Advanced Kit is plugged in, you turn on both units, press the power button on the Double Voltage Hub, and turn the power station switch on in your control panel. Your home will then solely start running off the power from both Delta Pros.

While running, you can see the amount of power outputted from the LCD screen.

EcoFlow mobile app

The EcoFlow Delta Pro connects to your phone via the EcoFlow app and a WiFi or Bluetooth connection. This is the central hub to get information about your power.

After pairing your units to the app, you can go in and customize the settings and name of the device and know the status of the power going in and out of it. The information available on the LCD screen is copied through the app.

You can see how much power is outputted through the device and from each port and outlet. This gives you a great insight into what connected devices are draining the most battery.

Settings for Screen Brightness, Battery Percentage, overall Settings panel, and Firmware Upgrades
Settings for Screen Brightness, Battery Percentage, overall Settings panel, and Firmware Upgrades


You can also customize the Delta Pro's sound when turning it on and how bright the LCD screen is. Energy management is also available, which allows you to stop recharging at a set level.

If you leave the Advanced Kit on and it is not outputting any power, you can set how long until it automatically turns off so the battery does not go to waste.

Firmware updates are a part of the Delta Pro, which you can download from your smartphone and sync to the power station. It's just like when you update your Apple Watch.

The update process is quick and straightforward, with no additional actions needed other than pressing "upgrade."

While the app allows you to customize and handle your Delta Pro in additional ways than just having the unit, this will only be available if the Delta Pro is turned on. Unfortunately, you cannot turn them on or off from the app.

A battery-operated home

The Delta Pro can be used as a stand-alone power source that can charge your devices and appliances without power, or you can pair it with another Delta Pro and create a whole-home power system.

EcoFlow Delta Pro
EcoFlow Delta Pro


The weight of Delta Pro is heavy, but with the included wheels, handles, and expanding bar underneath, transporting it is very easy. Likewise, maneuvering it around is simple, whether pulling or pushing it into place.

With so many different ways to charge the Delta Pro -- from a regular wall outlet to a car's cigarette lighter to even an EV charging station -- you can always find a way to keep your battery powered.

While the price is nearly $7,000 for the Advanced Kit, the longevity of a single battery cycle is impressive. A typical gas generator can typically go for around $600 and last up to 14.5 hours, but the Advanced Kit can last a whole week -- which is practically 14x longer than a gas generator.

The downside of the Advanced Kit is that you cannot turn on the units from the connected app with just the Advanced Kit. If the power goes out, you need to turn them on physically. However, this small isuse can be overseen, seeing how often you may need to turn it on.

It is powerful, quiet, informational, and long-lasting without needing to refill the battery daily. In addition, you do not have to go downstairs to check the battery status; you can do everything from your phone.

If you have the budget to do so and are looking for a long-lasting and efficient generator that is easy to use and set up, then the EcoFlow Advanced Kit is worth the money spent. Say goodbye to gas generators and hello to battery-powered ones; they are the future of home generating.

EcoFlow Advanced Kit -- Pros


  • Long battery life

  • Withholds a charge

  • Easy to operate

  • Accompanying app

  • Portable

  • Electric charging

  • Easy to set up

  • Multiple ports for input and output charging

  • Can operate indoors

EcoFlow Advanced Kit -- Cons


  • Very heavy

  • Cannot turn on from the app
High price

Rating: 4 out of 5

Where to purchase the EcoFlow Advanced Kit

You can purchase the EcoFlow Advanced Kit from the company's website starting at $6,799. It is currently only available in one color.

You can also purchase a singular Delta Pro from the same online store starting at $3,699.

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 27
    polymniapolymnia Posts: 1,080member
    I skimmed the article, so maybe I missed this: what, if any, solar panel charging capability does this unit have?

    I know it wouldn’t be the fastest way to recharge, but a backup power supply should be ready to accept power from as many backup sources as possible. If all the utility power is out, gas is not available and even EV chargers are out of service, the sun will still shine (unless it’s REALLY bad).
  • Reply 2 of 27
    eightzeroeightzero Posts: 3,079member
    The connection to Apple is...? This can be controlled by HomeKit? Or like Apple products, it involves electrons?
    right_said_fred
  • Reply 3 of 27
    jingojingo Posts: 117member
    I really don't want to be mean, but personally I think a journalist should understand enough about what he is writing so that it makes sense.

    This is one paragraph that particularly demonstrates the lack of understanding:

    "The Advanced Kit expands the kWh from 702 to 21.6. The battery holds 7,200W and can output up to 240V of power. This energy will give you up to one week of administrated power to your home."

    (1) "the kWh (is expanded) from 702 to 21.6". Really? Anyone can see that 21.6 is not an expansion of 702.

    (2) The battery holds 7,200W and can output up to 240V of power. 7,200W is not a capacity, it is a rate of consumption. Capacity is expressed in kWh, rate of consumption in kW. It's not completely wrong to say that 240v is a measure of power, but it's not strictly correct either. My guess from reading the article is that the capacity of one unit (not the "advanced kit") is 3,600Wh (3.6kWh) which is pretty weedy but would probably power a car for up to about one mile of use (at 3.5kWh/mile, say) disregarding any electrical losses.

    (3) "up to one week of administrated power" What does this mean? The length of time until the unit discharges is dependant on how fast the power is consumed. It might mean that its self-discharge rate is so high that after a week of it sitting there, whether used or not, the stored energy has all discharged. This statement needs to be explained.

    There are plenty of other unanswered questions here. Either the journalist needs to understand the subject better, or it needs to be edited by someone who does.
    muthuk_vanalingamthtappleinsiderusersconosciutoradarthekatchiapulseimages
  • Reply 4 of 27
    jingo said:
    I really don't want to be mean, but personally I think a journalist should understand enough about what he is writing so that it makes sense.

    This is one paragraph that particularly demonstrates the lack of understanding:

    "The Advanced Kit expands the kWh from 702 to 21.6. The battery holds 7,200W and can output up to 240V of power. This energy will give you up to one week of administrated power to your home."

    (1) "the kWh (is expanded) from 702 to 21.6". Really? Anyone can see that 21.6 is not an expansion of 702.

    (2) The battery holds 7,200W and can output up to 240V of power. 7,200W is not a capacity, it is a rate of consumption. Capacity is expressed in kWh, rate of consumption in kW. It's not completely wrong to say that 240v is a measure of power, but it's not strictly correct either. My guess from reading the article is that the capacity of one unit (not the "advanced kit") is 3,600Wh (3.6kWh) which is pretty weedy but would probably power a car for up to about one mile of use (at 3.5kWh/mile, say) disregarding any electrical losses.

    (3) "up to one week of administrated power" What does this mean? The length of time until the unit discharges is dependant on how fast the power is consumed. It might mean that its self-discharge rate is so high that after a week of it sitting there, whether used or not, the stored energy has all discharged. This statement needs to be explained.

    There are plenty of other unanswered questions here. Either the journalist needs to understand the subject better, or it needs to be edited by someone who does.
    I agree that the article is a bit confusing.

    W is a unit of power which does have a time or rate component, while W/hr is used for energy - either consumption as in how much energy your house or EV is using, or capacity, as in how much energy your battery can deliver.

    BTW, most EVs now can go about 4 miles/kWh, so 14 mi is possible on 3.5kWh.

    Voltage (V) all by itself is not an indication of power. Sometimes it is called "potential" because it is not until current (amperage or "A") flows that power is delivered. A higher voltage has a higher "potential" for power at any given current. This is basic Ohms law, where W=V*A 
    edited May 2023 isidoreappleinsideruserjingo
  • Reply 5 of 27
    isidoreisidore Posts: 68member
    Roundaboutnow has put much of the problem with this piece of technobabble clearly and rather too kindly. I would add this other quote: 

    “With a 3,600Wh battery inside, the Delta Pro can last up to one day and output 12V of power. It can be fully charged in roughly 2.7 hours — which is good statistically since you get nearly 12x the amount of usage out of the power station.”

    What can I say about this? Maybe someone who understood the basic physics and the units used  would have been a better choice to write this article? Even after reading the whole piece twice, a quite excruciating experience, I still don’t know, even though he states that the battery holds 3.6 kW.h of energy, how many hours or minutes it could sustain an ac load of say 1 kW. No, it’s not 3.6 hours because we don’t know how efficient it is at converting dc to ac and at what level of charge the electronics will cut off or fall over. Without this basic knowledge, it’s really hard to work out how useful this thing is. 
    On balance a small Honda generator and 10 litres of petrol is much more useful for emergency power and MUCH easier to carry, though you do need to put it outside. Remember that 1kg of hydrocarbon fuel stores as much energy as about 9 kg of battery and even allowing for the much lower conversion efficiency you are still streets ahead- and can refill it from a jerrycan indefinitely. 
    appleinsideruserchia
  • Reply 6 of 27
    isidoreisidore Posts: 68member
    Sorry, one other really fundamental error:

    “How fast the battery drains depends on how many appliances you have running on the unit. A regular generator will use the same amount of gas no matter how many devices you run.”

    No, no and no! A gas generator has a speed governor so that the generator runs at constant speed to give you the constant frequency that  ac devices need. If there is no load, the throttle is only just open enough to overcome the generator’s internal losses. As you add load the throttle has to be opened more to keep the speed the same so more fuel is used, and so on until you reach full throttle, maximum power output, and maximum fuel use. What he suggests is like saying a car dribbling along a flat road at 30 mph uses the same amount of fuel as doing 30 mph up a steep hill!
    appleinsideruserradarthekat
  • Reply 7 of 27
    So pleased so many accurate corrections have beaten me to the punch. Full marks to the commentators, room for improvement for the writer.
    radarthekat
  • Reply 8 of 27
    mikethemartianmikethemartian Posts: 1,359member
    Dooofus said:
    How is it legally possible to call a battery a generator? It doesn't generate anything. It simply stores power. 
    I find it odd they call them generators.
  • Reply 9 of 27
    mikethemartianmikethemartian Posts: 1,359member
    isidore said:
    Sorry, one other really fundamental error:

    “How fast the battery drains depends on how many appliances you have running on the unit. A regular generator will use the same amount of gas no matter how many devices you run.”

    No, no and no! A gas generator has a speed governor so that the generator runs at constant speed to give you the constant frequency that  ac devices need. If there is no load, the throttle is only just open enough to overcome the generator’s internal losses. As you add load the throttle has to be opened more to keep the speed the same so more fuel is used, and so on until you reach full throttle, maximum power output, and maximum fuel use. What he suggests is like saying a car dribbling along a flat road at 30 mph uses the same amount of fuel as doing 30 mph up a steep hill!
    Correct, the power supply sets the voltage potential across the load and then it is the load’s impedance that determines its current/power draw at that voltage. Except of course until the maximum current/power capability of the source is reached after which it will no longer be able to maintain the desired voltage potential.
  • Reply 10 of 27
    rcomeaurcomeau Posts: 79member
    The article mentions that in a power failure, you can charge it at an EV charging station (and skip the lines at a gas station). Unless the power failure is local, EV charging stations also need a working grid to work, so charging at an EV station may not be an option (making that gas station option look a lot more appealing).
  • Reply 11 of 27
    This article really is the gift that keeps on giving! I'm starting to feel a little sorry for Nathaniel Pangaro now...
  • Reply 12 of 27
    NateP3300NateP3300 Posts: 4member
    polymnia said:
    I skimmed the article, so maybe I missed this: what, if any, solar panel charging capability does this unit have?

    I know it wouldn’t be the fastest way to recharge, but a backup power supply should be ready to accept power from as many backup sources as possible. If all the utility power is out, gas is not available and even EV chargers are out of service, the sun will still shine (unless it’s REALLY bad).
    Hi there, thank you for the comment! The solar panel charging unit is sold separately, and since we did not receive it in the review unit, it was not part of the review. 
  • Reply 13 of 27
    NateP3300NateP3300 Posts: 4member
    jingo said:
    I really don't want to be mean, but personally I think a journalist should understand enough about what he is writing so that it makes sense.

    This is one paragraph that particularly demonstrates the lack of understanding:

    "The Advanced Kit expands the kWh from 702 to 21.6. The battery holds 7,200W and can output up to 240V of power. This energy will give you up to one week of administrated power to your home."

    (1) "the kWh (is expanded) from 702 to 21.6". Really? Anyone can see that 21.6 is not an expansion of 702.

    (2) The battery holds 7,200W and can output up to 240V of power. 7,200W is not a capacity, it is a rate of consumption. Capacity is expressed in kWh, rate of consumption in kW. It's not completely wrong to say that 240v is a measure of power, but it's not strictly correct either. My guess from reading the article is that the capacity of one unit (not the "advanced kit") is 3,600Wh (3.6kWh) which is pretty weedy but would probably power a car for up to about one mile of use (at 3.5kWh/mile, say) disregarding any electrical losses.

    (3) "up to one week of administrated power" What does this mean? The length of time until the unit discharges is dependant on how fast the power is consumed. It might mean that its self-discharge rate is so high that after a week of it sitting there, whether used or not, the stored energy has all discharged. This statement needs to be explained.

    There are plenty of other unanswered questions here. Either the journalist needs to understand the subject better, or it needs to be edited by someone who does.
    Hi and thank you for catching these! After reading the comments, we have updated the text that you have mentioned to make it less confusing. I always appreciate feedback. Thank you! 😃
    appleinsiderusermuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 14 of 27
    NateP3300NateP3300 Posts: 4member
    rcomeau said:
    The article mentions that in a power failure, you can charge it at an EV charging station (and skip the lines at a gas station). Unless the power failure is local, EV charging stations also need a working grid to work, so charging at an EV station may not be an option (making that gas station option look a lot more appealing).
    Hi there and thank you for the comment! This part was focused on local power outages, but I understand your reasoning. This part was also trying to allure to the idea that, just like some people may cross state lines to get gas during widespread power outages, they would do the same for EV charging locations (which would be more efficient is states not being impacted by outages). Thank you for your input! 😃
    appleinsiderusermuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 15 of 27
    NateP3300NateP3300 Posts: 4member
    (Accidentally posted the same response twice 😬)
    edited May 2023
  • Reply 16 of 27
    thttht Posts: 5,494member
    rcomeau said:
    The article mentions that in a power failure, you can charge it at an EV charging station (and skip the lines at a gas station). Unless the power failure is local, EV charging stations also need a working grid to work, so charging at an EV station may not be an option (making that gas station option look a lot more appealing).
    Gas stations need power to pump gas. So, they themselves need to have a backup generator when the power goes out for them to operate. No backup power, no pumping gas for them. 

    Not sure what scenario an owner would have to need to go get a backup battery charged. There’s I forgot to charge before going camping scenario. Perhaps, the power has been out for more than a few hours situation. Pretty rare scenarios. 

    If a homeowner has a bank of these, like 20 kWH worth, they should get solar panels. A camper can get portable solar panels.

    A homeowner can get the advanced kit and use it to power the house during the day while charging at night, assuming the power company allows them to use their nights-free plans in this manner. 
  • Reply 17 of 27
    The future is hooking up batteries to your house to take advantage of off peak energy. You need a proper inverter integrated into your supply to make this practical. The battery can be your parked EV. 

    PS well done on your comments Nate! We live and learn…
    NateP3300thtmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 18 of 27
    Fidonet127Fidonet127 Posts: 512member
    NateP3300 said:
    rcomeau said:
    The article mentions that in a power failure, you can charge it at an EV charging station (and skip the lines at a gas station). Unless the power failure is local, EV charging stations also need a working grid to work, so charging at an EV station may not be an option (making that gas station option look a lot more appealing).
    Hi there and thank you for the comment! This part was focused on local power outages, but I understand your reasoning. This part was also trying to allure to the idea that, just like some people may cross state lines to get gas during widespread power outages, they would do the same for EV charging locations (which would be more efficient is states not being impacted by outages). Thank you for your input! ߘ㦬t;/div>
    Some EV charging stations do have backup batteries, so it maybe an option, depending if the station is working, or isn't busy with all the other EV charging. 

    So we are going to cross state lines..... in a gas or EV with one hundred or more pounds of equipment? If a EV, do you have enough charge to make it, or are somehow going to charge along the way? If gas, why not just get a generator, which you can just keep filling up from extra gas cans or get a whole house generator running off a large propane tank? Why this system, when it doesn't come on automatically? At least a whole house generator will come on automatically. You could do a Telsa power wall system with solar panels that comes on automatically, some other solar with battery system. If you have solar, great if there is enough sunshine, or if they haven't been destroyed by the same weather event that might of caused the outage.
    edited May 2023
  • Reply 19 of 27
    Fidonet127Fidonet127 Posts: 512member
    tht said:
    rcomeau said:
    The article mentions that in a power failure, you can charge it at an EV charging station (and skip the lines at a gas station). Unless the power failure is local, EV charging stations also need a working grid to work, so charging at an EV station may not be an option (making that gas station option look a lot more appealing).
    Gas stations need power to pump gas. So, they themselves need to have a backup generator when the power goes out for them to operate. No backup power, no pumping gas for them. 

    Not sure what scenario an owner would have to need to go get a backup battery charged. There’s I forgot to charge before going camping scenario. Perhaps, the power has been out for more than a few hours situation. Pretty rare scenarios. 

    If a homeowner has a bank of these, like 20 kWH worth, they should get solar panels. A camper can get portable solar panels.

    A homeowner can get the advanced kit and use it to power the house during the day while charging at night, assuming the power company allows them to use their nights-free plans in this manner. 
    The power needed to run a gas station is a lot less than needed to run EV charging stations. 
  • Reply 20 of 27
    Fidonet127Fidonet127 Posts: 512member
    The future is hooking up batteries to your house to take advantage of off peak energy. You need a proper inverter integrated into your supply to make this practical. The battery can be your parked EV. 

    PS well done on your comments Nate! We live and learn…
    If you use batteries in this way, you end up using more power, and the batteries will wear out after a while. Every step, has its inefficiency. Batteries themselves have a self discharge rate.
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