EU tells Apple to open everything up to its rivals

Posted:
in General Discussion

European Commissioner Thierry Breton says the Digital Markets Act is just a beginning, and Apple must open up its whole ecosystem to competitors.




The EU's Digital Markets Act (DMA) was created to target Big Tech firms like Apple, and make a fairer business environment for all comers. The DMA became law in the EU in November 2022, and became applicable from May 2023, though it is still in the process of being implemented.

According to Reuters, Thierry Breton has now called on Apple to open up its hardware and software ecosystem.

"The next job for Apple and other Big Tech, under the DMA is to open up its gates to competitors," he said. "Be it the electronic wallet, browsers or app stores, consumers using an Apple iPhone should be able to benefit from competitive services by a range of providers."

Breton said this after meeting with Tim Cook in Brussels, where the Apple CEO is certain to have reiterated the company's arguments about security and privacy.

"EU regulation fosters innovation, without compromising on security and privacy," Breton told Reuters.

Apple has not commented. Cook's trip to Brussels was not announced, and he hasn't referred to his meeting with the EU Commissioner. However, he has tweeted about meeting with Apple Store staff in the city.

Read on AppleInsider

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 86
    red oakred oak Posts: 1,051member
    "EU regulation fosters innovation, without compromising on security and privacy“  

    What a f****** joke 
    foregoneconclusiondope_ahminepscooter63flyingdpiOSDevSWErhbellmorAfarstarpulseimageswilliamlondondanox
  • Reply 2 of 86
    That doesn't sound like anything new. Wallet/browsers/stores are the same things that have been focused on before. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 86
    jdgazjdgaz Posts: 402member
    Now I completely understand why England left the EU. 
    flyingdpiOSDevSWEjbdragonrhbellmorAfarstarjfabula1pulseimageswilliamlondondanox9secondkox2
  • Reply 4 of 86
    red oak said:
    "EU regulation fosters innovation, without compromising on security and privacy“  

    What a f****** joke 
    Yeah, it's completely obvious that they want to weaken security/privacy. They refused to even consider privacy/security as a competitive feature of iOS despite all of the data that showed Apple DID market privacy/security to customers regularly AND that customers placed a high value on it. 
    flyingdprhbellmorAfarstarpulseimagesWavelan_312bloggerblogbyronlAlex1NKierkegaardenbaconstang
  • Reply 5 of 86
    red oak said:
    "EU regulation fosters innovation, without compromising on security and privacy“  

    What a f****** joke 
    He really has no fkn clue of what he’s talking about.
    🃏
    Afarstarpulseimages9secondkox2bloggerblogAlex1NKierkegaardenstrongywatto_cobra
  • Reply 6 of 86
    red oak said:
    "EU regulation fosters innovation, without compromising on security and privacy“  

    What a f****** joke 
    He really has no fkn clue of what he’s talking about.
    🃏
    Apple is going to be forced, by these id1ots, to allow alternate app stores, wallets, etc.  I hope that every install and every invocation of an app from an alternative app store is preceded  with the warning "This app was not tested by Apple - do you want to proceed?"  Sort of like those super annoying cookie dialog you're forced to click through on every European web site.  But unlike those web sites, Apple users will still have the choice of only downloading/installing apps from the Apple App store.  That alone will keep most people from going to alternatives.
    rhbellmorpulseimagesjahbladeAlex1Nred oakbaconstangdarren mccoyjas99radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 7 of 86
    mknelsonmknelson Posts: 1,094member
    jdgaz said:
    Now I completely understand why England left the EU. 
    The con by Nigel Farage and his buddies? In the UK today Brexit is widely considered to be a failure. Even Nigel has said that.
    rotateleftbyteScot1foregoneconclusionpulseimageswilliamlondonMBearlordjohnwhorfinchiadope_ahminegodofbiscuits
  • Reply 8 of 86
    mknelson said:
    jdgaz said:
    Now I completely understand why England left the EU. 
    The con by Nigel Farage and his buddies? In the UK today Brexit is widely considered to be a failure. Even Nigel has said that.
    A failure that will hang around our necks long after Nigel has drunk his last pint.
    mind you, the EU is shooting itself in the foot with these new border controls (to get into a Schengen Country). Big Brother is watching you all the time that you are inside the zone.
    I predict a huge drop in travel into the Schengen area in 2024 and the EU will be to blame for that.
    Alex1NradarthekatFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 86
    Scot1Scot1 Posts: 119member
    As a Canadian, while, I don’t support legislation to force Apple to open up their eco stream, make no mistake, the EU is as economically powerful as the United States. 
    edited September 26 williamlondonlordjohnwhorfinchiagrandact73baconstang
  • Reply 10 of 86
    Sorry but the EU really needs to f*#$k off in this. Sorry have no other words for it. There are different strategies, and a closed ecosystem is one of them.  In my opinion we need to be very vocal about this. Enough is enough 
    danoxiOS_Guy80zeus423baconstangJanNLjas99strongywatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 86
    twolf2919 said:
    red oak said:
    "EU regulation fosters innovation, without compromising on security and privacy“  

    What a f****** joke 
    He really has no fkn clue of what he’s talking about.
    🃏
    Apple is going to be forced, by these id1ots, to allow alternate app stores, wallets, etc.  I hope that every install and every invocation of an app from an alternative app store is preceded  with the warning "This app was not tested by Apple - do you want to proceed?"  Sort of like those super annoying cookie dialog you're forced to click through on every European web site.  But unlike those web sites, Apple users will still have the choice of only downloading/installing apps from the Apple App store.  That alone will keep most people from going to alternatives.
    If only that were true. Forcing Apple to allow side-loading through other app stores means app designers who do not wish to abide by Apple's security, privacy or reliability standards will be free to only market their apps outside of the Apple App Store. Sure, small app developers may see the wisdom of sticking with Apple's system, but big competitors will absolutely stop making their apps available through Apple's store, and so iPhone users will have to choose between security and using popular apps, starting with anything from Amazon, Google, Meta, X, Netflix, and Epic. 

    This is because what the EU and others are ignoring is that consumer choice starts with the choice of device and operating system. You want to be able to purchase apps directly from their developers? There are already scads of device options for that.
    williamlondonchia9secondkox2Alex1NKierkegaardenstrongyradarthekatFileMakerFellerfreeassociate2watto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 86
    Dear Thierry, can I have a BMW engine in my Mercedes, please? And I should be able to put any headlights in my car well well, thank you. And while you’re at it, I want to control my Bosch appliance with the Samsung app, buy competitors’ products in my supermarket of choice and run iOS on Android phones. No biggie for you, I suppose. Cheers. 
    MBearone more thingScot1danoxchiageorgie019secondkox2williamhtdknoxmobird
  • Reply 13 of 86
    The EU can piss off.
    9secondkox2zeus423Kierkegaardendarren mccoyJanNLjas99strongyradarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 86
    jdgaz said:
    Now I completely understand why England left the EU. 
    Bigotry and lies, actually. That what you like?
    lordjohnwhorfin9secondkox2Alex1NtenthousandthingsSkepticalblastdoorwatto_cobra
  • Reply 15 of 86
    If Apple had the visceral fortitude they would promptly and concisely tell the EU to f$&k off and start closing down shop and stop selling to any EU member country.  Maybe the folk there will rise up against the EU ruling class.  With the expanding Asia market Apple will not fall.  Sure, it will affect the stock market at first, but for Tim Cook to always tout "principles" he needs not to bow to the EU.  The USB/C issue is one thing, but this new EU demand will open Apple's Pandora's box.
    Alex1NKierkegaardenbaconstangJanNLmike1jas99radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 86
    If you think this is bad you need to look at the new UK legislation passed in the last few days that compels all apps to open user data to the Government. It is being pushed worldwide. 
    sphericAlex1Njas99FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 86
    danoxdanox Posts: 2,407member
    jamnap said:
    If Apple had the visceral fortitude they would promptly and concisely tell the EU to f$&k off and start closing down shop and stop selling to any EU member country.  Maybe the folk there will rise up against the EU ruling class.  With the expanding Asia market Apple will not fall.  Sure, it will affect the stock market at first, but for Tim Cook to always tout "principles" he needs not to bow to the EU.  The USB/C issue is one thing, but this new EU demand will open Apple's Pandora's box.
    Apple has to draw the line in the sand, all European Apple devices within the EU have no store included you sell just the core Apple software with the iPhone, Apple Watch, iPad and Apple Watch.

    It’s time for those do nothings in Washington DC to earn their pay. 

    Europe just represents about 19% of Apples total revenue, and when compared to other parts of the world, it’s falling, Apples revenue in Europe is about the same as the entire country of Japan.

    https://www.businessofapps.com/data/app-revenues/.      Select Chart App revenue by region
    edited September 26 jamnaptdknoxAlex1Nbaconstangjas99radarthekatwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 86
    The whole point is to enable unfettered access to the Apple ecosystem for intelligence services and commerce&crime. Nothing personal, just business. And we're talking huge business here.

    Make no mistake; the politicians promoting this for their intelligence- and commercial overlords know exactly what they are doing and they know they will get away with it as long as they keep hammering on about children's safety and freedom of choice for consumers.

    Of course consumers already have freedom of choice, they can choose the platforms they like best. And the kiddie porn users will simply continue to set up their own walled gardens, independent of what the platforms have to offer. The politicians of course know all this, but it is of no consequence to them.

    As a consumer I have exercised my freedom of choice and explicitly chosen the facilities and security of the Apple ecosystem. The politicians are explicitly trying to take that freedom of choice away from me.
    Alex1NbaconstangJanNLjas99FileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 19 of 86
    sphericspheric Posts: 2,477member
    jdgaz said:
    Now I completely understand why England left the EU. 
    No, Britain left the EU because rich crooks wanted the freedom to keep hiding their money in offshore tax havens after it was clear that the EU would eventually crack down on them. 

    So they lied to the public about supposedly overreaching EU legislation — despite the fact that most of the legislation was for the large part (co-)written by Britain. Plus a lot of bullshit about 350 million £ a week sent to Europe that could be used for the NHS instead (which was a blatant lie, but Blojo escaped criminal prosecution for it). 

    Farage has dual citizenship with an EU state, so he can just choose whatever suits him better financially and personally — in contrast to all the stupid sheep he hoodwinked, and all the others who didn't fall for it but have to live with the consequences anyway. 

    ALSO: Have you seen the shit the British government just tried to pull on end-to-end-encrypted messengers? Screw interoperability — they tried to force all operators to BREAK encryption. Thankfully, they backed down after it became clear that all messengers would have to pull out of Britain, or compromise encryption globally. The EU toyed with that, as did the USA, but it never left the idea phase. 
    Post-Brexit Britain actually wrote it into law and tried to pass it. 
    edited September 26 avon b7Alex1NbaconstangSkepticalblastdoorPauloSeraaauxioFileMakerFellerwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 86
    Apple is going to be forced, by these id1ots, to allow alternate app stores, wallets, etc.  I hope that every install and every invocation of an app from an alternative app store is preceded  with the warning "This app was not tested by Apple - do you want to proceed?"  Sort of like those super annoying cookie dialog you're forced to click through on every European web site.  But unlike those web sites, Apple users will still have the choice of only downloading/installing apps from the Apple App store.  That alone will keep most people from going to alternatives.


    You must be kidding.

    So, Apple vetted all these scam apps?


    https://tech.hindustantimes.com/tech/news/84-dangerous-scam-apps-found-on-iphone-app-store-your-stealing-money-check-full-list-of-apps-71658128703429.html



    https://www.tomsguide.com/news/apples-app-store-approved-these-crypto-scam-apps-how-to-stay-safe



    https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2023/02/pig-butchering-scam-apps-sneak-into-apples-app-store-and-google-play/



    https://www.macrumors.com/2023/04/25/chatgpt-scam-apps-mac-app-store/



    https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2021/06/06/apple-app-store-scams-fraud/


    The list goes on


    Alex1Nmuthuk_vanalingam
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