Tim Cook says he always knew Apple would arrive at the Apple Vision Pro

Posted:
in General Discussion edited February 1

In a new interview, Apple CEO Tim Cook was pictured for the first time wearing the Apple Vision Pro, and discussed the inevitable road to the headset.

Tim Cook dons the Apple Vision Pro
Tim Cook dons the Apple Vision Pro | Credit: Vanity Fair



The Apple Vision Pro is set to start arriving to early adopters on February 2, after years of rumors about its arrival. In a new interview with Vanity Fair, Cook discusses what it took to make Apple's spatial computing headset.

According to Tim Cook, the first time he experienced the Apple Vision Pro was more than five years ago. The prototype he tried, however, was not the sleek mask we've come to know today. Instead, it was a crude, large box with multiple screens and cameras and wires that stuck out everywere.

"You weren't really wearing it at that time," he tells the interviewer. "It wasn't wearable by any means of the imagination."

However, that first experience took Tim Cook and put him on the moon -- and that's when he knew.

"I've known for years we would get here," Cook said. "I didn't know when, but I knew that we would arrive here."

The interview also examines other people's experiences with the Apple Vision Pro. Director James Cameron called his experience "religious." Technology Writer Om Malik said it was "amazing and incredible."

Even Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, Greg Joswiak, points out how people's first universal experience with the headset is awe.

"You know, one of our most common reactions we love is people go, 'Hold on, I just need a minute. I need to process what just happened,'" he told the interviewer. "How cool is that? How often do people have a product experience where they're left speechless, right?"

Apple is obviously excited about its product. Not everybody is.

"I'm sure the technology is terrific. I still think and hope it fails," one Silicon Valley investor told Vanity Fair. "Apple feels more and more like a tech fentanyl dealer that poses as a rehab provider."

Cook wraps the interview by talking about how creating future-changing technology is less about plans and more about exploration.

"What we do is we get really excited about something and then we start pulling the string and see where it takes us," Cook said. "And yes, we've got things on the road maps and so forth, and yes, we have a definitive point of view. But a lot of it is also the exploration and figuring out."

"Sometimes the dots connect. And they lead you to some place that you didn't expect."



Read on AppleInsider

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 34
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,727member
    The main issue I see is the isolation, from watching a movie alone to the inability to work on a joint project.  I have to believe the 'loneliness' aspect will be addressed.  I assume Apple plans to include a collaborative environment in future updates.
    PauloSeraanubusAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 34
    MacPro said:
    The main issue I see is the isolation, from watching a movie alone to the inability to work on a joint project.  I have to believe the 'loneliness' aspect will be addressed.  I assume Apple plans to include a collaborative environment in future updates.
    Maybe you should not assume it’s not shipping with it.
    PauloSeraawilliamlondoncpsrojas99Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 34
    MacPro said:
    The main issue I see is the isolation, from watching a movie alone to the inability to work on a joint project.  I have to believe the 'loneliness' aspect will be addressed.  I assume Apple plans to include a collaborative environment in future updates.
    I think it's interesting that people put so much emphasis on "isolation" simply because the user is wearing the screen. The spatial computing aspect really isn't any different from an environmental awareness standpoint. You're concentrating on the virtual screens that you set up but you can still see what's in the real world. And the reality is that any type of concentrated activity that involves screens or pages is going to technically "isolate" you. Example: you can't really read a book and socialize at the same time. 

    Plus, from an environmental standpoint, this is a far better use of materials than screen based tech. Larger and larger screens = more and more e-waste. This product provides the huge screens and multiple screens with postage stamp sized material use. 
    edited February 1 PauloSeraaMisterKitStrangeDayswilliamlondoniOS_Guy80lolliverchasmjas99Alex1Nracerhomie3
  • Reply 4 of 34
    Holy crud, the tech fentanyl quote investor should gtfo of the business entirely. 
    schmrtzzzblastdoorStrangeDaysramanpfaffroundaboutnowlolliverchasmlordjohnwhorfinjas99Alex1N
  • Reply 5 of 34
    It amazes me the lengths these guys will go to build a fantasy around something in hopes that people believe they are committed to it. In truth Apple will drop Vision Pro entirely if it doesn't sell well enough. Presale data isn't good, and Tim's continued experiment to see how much he can convince people to pay for something is starting to unravel. Apple simply does not do low volume products. They either cancel them entirely, or they let them die on the vine for ages while the 8 customers who bought into the idea are left hanging in the wind. Given the general feeling toward VR headsets on the market, the presale numbers most likely reflect a huge chunk of the people even interested in buying a Vision Pro, leaving day to day sales from here out to be scarce. If Apple can't even sell half a million units in the first year, their interest in the category will quickly diminish. Everyone assumes that version 2 is a given, but that's a bad assumption. Apple does not throw good money after bad, and they've already spent exorbitant amounts of money on the development of something that has amounted to an iPad for your face that costs $3,500, and requires wearing an objectionable piece hardware that is heavy, uncomfortable for any length time, nausea-inducing for most people, tethered to the wall, and completely world-isolating. What other Apple product even comes close to having that many negative tradeoffs? There is almost nothing good that you can say about this product that isn't outweighed but its downsides.

    Apple has said that AR is the future, and I agree. So they go and build a VR headset, something no one anywhere thinks is the future, and try to do AR with it.

    AR is all about the view finder. We already have the ability in software to do amazing things with AR, but they're nothing more than a tech demo until we get the view finder right. And a VR headset is not it. No more closer than holding an iPhone up to your face and looking through the lens of the camera. Apple knows this, and knows that glasses are the wearable of the future, and that everyday glasses that can be powered by iPhone to project AR into your world are a game changer. They also know that the technology to do this well is still several years away, and Tim Cook knows he won't be CEO by the time that comes around. He wanted spatial computing to be part of his legacy so badly that he pushed a product onto market years before it was ready, bolstered by his successes with overcharging customers in the last several years. Things like raising the price of products every time a new feature is added is a Tim Cook invention that customers have rewarded him for, and it has led to some poor decisions...Vision Pro's release being the pinnacle.
    nubusgrandact739secondkox2muthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondonM68000blurpbleepbloopAlex1NcanukstormRick601
  • Reply 6 of 34
    Further marketing from Apple. Everyone loves a story with background. 

    More likely he tried the oculus since that came out even further back. 

    And that’s when he knew that he wanted Apple to try the headset space. 
    edited February 1
  • Reply 7 of 34
    It amazes me the lengths these guys will go to build a fantasy around something in hopes that people believe they are committed to it. In truth Apple will drop Vision Pro entirely if it doesn't sell well enough. Presale data isn't good, and Tim's continued experiment to see how much he can convince people to pay for something is starting to unravel. Apple simply does not do low volume products. They either cancel them entirely, or they let them die on the vine for ages while the 8 customers who bought into the idea are left hanging in the wind. Given the general feeling toward VR headsets on the market, the presale numbers most likely reflect a huge chunk of the people even interested in buying a Vision Pro, leaving day to day sales from here out to be scarce. If Apple can't even sell half a million units in the first year, their interest in the category will quickly diminish. Everyone assumes that version 2 is a given, but that's a bad assumption. Apple does not throw good money after bad, and they've already spent exorbitant amounts of money on the development of something that has amounted to an iPad for your face that costs $3,500, and requires wearing an objectionable piece hardware that is heavy, uncomfortable for any length time, nausea-inducing for most people, tethered to the wall, and completely world-isolating. What other Apple product even comes close to having that many negative tradeoffs? There is almost nothing good that you can say about this product that isn't outweighed but its downsides.

    Apple has said that AR is the future, and I agree. So they go and build a VR headset, something no one anywhere thinks is the future, and try to do AR with it.

    AR is all about the view finder. We already have the ability in software to do amazing things with AR, but they're nothing more than a tech demo until we get the view finder right. And a VR headset is not it. No more closer than holding an iPhone up to your face and looking through the lens of the camera. Apple knows this, and knows that glasses are the wearable of the future, and that everyday glasses that can be powered by iPhone to project AR into your world are a game changer. They also know that the technology to do this well is still several years away, and Tim Cook knows he won't be CEO by the time that comes around. He wanted spatial computing to be part of his legacy so badly that he pushed a product onto market years before it was ready, bolstered by his successes with overcharging customers in the last several years. Things like raising the price of products every time a new feature is added is a Tim Cook invention that customers have rewarded him for, and it has led to some poor decisions...Vision Pro's release being the pinnacle.
    Great post. 
    muthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 8 of 34
    The headline photo is Tim Cook doing a pretty dang good job of cosplaying Cyclops from X-Men. Got his hand by the visor release button and everything. 
  • Reply 9 of 34
    nubusnubus Posts: 384member
    MacPro said:
    The main issue I see is the isolation, from watching a movie alone to the inability to work on a joint project.  I have to believe the 'loneliness' aspect will be addressed.  I assume Apple plans to include a collaborative environment in future updates.
    I don't see it work at work. In my job there are so many interactions with developers, testers, UX,... I can't be Darth Nubus at work. I wouldn't be able to leave my desk without having to switch to battery... and that requires a full restart.

    Even Apple didn't design their campus to let each person stay at their desk. Apple HQ is designed to make sure people meet. This thing doesn't bring new connections. It isolates you. To me it feels like a Segway or entertainment device. But AR glasses... that would be something.
    muthuk_vanalingamwilliamlondon
  • Reply 10 of 34
    As an admitted Apple fanboy, I use Apple products daily: from the Apple Watch, iPad, iPhone, to the MacBook Pro. They make my work and life more enjoyable and productive. However, I have no interest (at this time) in purchasing the Vision Pro because of the cost and the lack of a clear use case for me. However, that said, I think it's like many other Apple products that have been created in the past. It will be the vehicle that brilliant app developers will create a market and create killer apps for. That combined with the refinement of the product in size, weight, cost, and form factor, and it won't be long before the market will explode for versions of it. And, I believe due to the development dollars that Apple has invested, this is just the tip of the iceberg of products that will cascade from or use technology developed for it (ie: eyeglasses, Apple Car, 3D cameras/3D video, etc..). I think it's a mistake to look at this first iteration of this technology to judge whether it will be a success for the company.
    StrangeDayswilliamlondonlibertyandfreeiOS_Guy80Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 11 of 34
    CarmBCarmB Posts: 80member
    It surprises me that since the battery was put into a separate unit more of the electronics involved hasn’t been incorporated into the external supplemental unit. Doing so would, I would imagine, result in a lighter headset and that would improve the comfort in long-term use.

    Of course, I’m no engineer, so maybe I’m way off base here, but it sure seems to me that the less electronics a user is expected to put on one’s head, the better the experience all around. 

    Just saying . . . 
    williamlondonblurpbleepbloopAlex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 34
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 3,295member
    I’m sure it’s an impressive experience, but I can’t see myself buying one for quite a while. 

    From gruber’s review, it sounds like a heavy, fussy device that *currently* is best suited to watching movies alone on a couch. 
    Alex1N
  • Reply 13 of 34
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,879member
    "I'm sure the technology is terrific. I still think and hope it fails," one Silicon Valley investor told Vanity Fair. "Apple feels more and more like a tech fentanyl dealer that poses as a rehab provider."
    this quote from (an anonymous?) SV investor is ridiculous. One, he’s in the wrong business. Two, Apple has lead the way for things like parental controls, while companies like FB/IG intentionally design to hook kids. 
    williamlondonihatescreennamesroundaboutnowlolliverlordjohnwhorfinjas99Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 34
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,879member

    It amazes me the lengths these guys will go to build a fantasy around something in hopes that people believe they are committed to it. In truth Apple will drop Vision Pro entirely if it doesn't sell well enough. Presale data isn't good, and Tim's continued experiment to see how much he can convince people to pay for something is starting to unravel. Apple simply does not do low volume products. They either cancel them entirely, or they let them die on the vine for ages while the 8 customers who bought into the idea are left hanging in the wind. Given the general feeling toward VR headsets on the market, the presale numbers most likely reflect a huge chunk of the people even interested in buying a Vision Pro, leaving day to day sales from here out to be scarce. If Apple can't even sell half a million units in the first year, their interest in the category will quickly diminish. Everyone assumes that version 2 is a given, but that's a bad assumption. Apple does not throw good money after bad, and they've already spent exorbitant amounts of money on the development of something that has amounted to an iPad for your face that costs $3,500, and requires wearing an objectionable piece hardware that is heavy, uncomfortable for any length time, nausea-inducing for most people, tethered to the wall, and completely world-isolating. What other Apple product even comes close to having that many negative tradeoffs? There is almost nothing good that you can say about this product that isn't outweighed but its downsides.

    Apple has said that AR is the future, and I agree. So they go and build a VR headset, something no one anywhere thinks is the future, and try to do AR with it.

    AR is all about the view finder. We already have the ability in software to do amazing things with AR, but they're nothing more than a tech demo until we get the view finder right. And a VR headset is not it. No more closer than holding an iPhone up to your face and looking through the lens of the camera. Apple knows this, and knows that glasses are the wearable of the future, and that everyday glasses that can be powered by iPhone to project AR into your world are a game changer. They also know that the technology to do this well is still several years away, and Tim Cook knows he won't be CEO by the time that comes around. He wanted spatial computing to be part of his legacy so badly that he pushed a product onto market years before it was ready, bolstered by his successes with overcharging customers in the last several years. Things like raising the price of products every time a new feature is added is a Tim Cook invention that customers have rewarded him for, and it has led to some poor decisions...Vision Pro's release being the pinnacle.
    Nonsense. You have to crawl, walk, run. You cannot simply skip to sprinting. If you aren’t slightly embarrassed about your first versions, you released too late. These are things we know in the development world. No offense but your perspective sounds like a pure consumer’s — “Why can’t you just release a fully formed perfect product from day 1!” Not how it works, my guy. The innovations in AVP will be the launchpad for many more revisions and incremental, iterative improvements. That’s how technology works. See the first TVs, the first cars, the first washers, etc etc. And yes the incredible work put into this as a VR/AR product will be utilized for AR-only products down the line. 
    edited February 1 williamlondonihatescreennamesMacProroundaboutnowdrewys808lolliverchasmlordjohnwhorfinjas99Chris_Pelham
  • Reply 15 of 34
    StrangeDaysStrangeDays Posts: 12,879member
    blastdoor said:
    I’m sure it’s an impressive experience, but I can’t see myself buying one for quite a while. 

    From gruber’s review, it sounds like a heavy, fussy device that *currently* is best suited to watching movies alone on a couch. 
    I must have read a different Gruber review. He said they nailed it, and all other products in this category will copy their UX. 

    Yep he said he ran into some minor bugs but that didn’t damper his enthusiasm whatsoever:

    This is not confusing or complex, but it feels profound. […]

    But the conceptual design of VisionOS lays the foundation for an entirely new direction of interaction design. Just like how the basic concepts of the original Mac interface were exactly right, and remain true to this day. Just like how the original iPhone defined the way every phone in the world now works. […]

    The fundamental interaction model in VisionOS feels like it will be copied by all future VR/AR headsets, in the same way that all desktop computers work like the Mac, and all phones and tablets now work like the iPhone. And when that happens, some will argue that of course they all work that way, because how else could they work? But personal computers didn’t have point-and-click GUIs before the Mac, and phones didn’t have “it’s all just a big touchscreen” interfaces before the iPhone. No other headset today has a “just look at a target, and tap your finger and thumb” interface today. I suspect in a few years they all will. […]

    Spatial computing in VisionOS is the real deal. It’s a legit productivity computing platform right now, and it’s only going to get better. It sounds like hype, but I truly believe this is a landmark breakthrough like the 1984 Macintosh and the 2007 iPhone.

    https://daringfireball.net/2024/01/the_vision_pro
    ihatescreennamesroundaboutnowthtlolliverchasmlordjohnwhorfinAlex1Nwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 16 of 34
    avon b7avon b7 Posts: 7,691member
    The marketing love is understandable and Apple does like to go OTT with the wording so I think it's all part and parcel of any launch.

    However, someone should have stepped in when he tried to sell it as 'future changing'. 

    That's cringeworthy. 

    The VP isn't any more 'future changing' than what we know is already out there or in the pipe. 

    The problem is actually waiting for technology to become affordable enough for the mass market. 

    Apple chose to run with a souped up option and the price reflects that. 

    Others have chosen to dial down the options until the devices become more affordable (but they are still expensive). 

    For me, I'm perfectly happy that it's made it this far, and personally, I think it will be here to stay although I'll be the first to admit that Apple can be weak on commitment. 

    Was it released too early? Maybe, but I don't see that as a problem for a non-mass market device. In fact I see it as an advantage. Real world feedback and issues will lead to a better product, and faster, down the road. 

    Some people will feel very uncomfortable with it because, in their view, Apple never releases anything until it's fully baked. That was never true but many have convinced themselves it was. The VP clearly needs a little more time. 

    That shouldn't be an issue, though. It's good enough as it is and promising. 

    There are some nice touches but, as expected, some disappointments. 

    One of my favourite announced features was EyeSight but sadly it seems to look nothing like what is seen in the promo material. It will improve in future versions for sure. 

    On the subject of isolation, I think we need to accept that all visor headsets isolate and even with pass-through capacity you are withdrawing from the outside world to a degree. 

    Reading a book doesn't isolate you from your sensory options. 

    If it were three times cheaper would I get one? I doubt it because I rarely jump on any first gen product but two or three years from now I would definitely be interested. 

    It needs time and I'm really optimistic. The same applies to all other headset manufacturers too. Once 5.5G and more content is available it will be an attractive proposition for a wider audience. Weight will come down. Batteries will be better. Comfort will improve... 


    muthuk_vanalingamacross04Alex1N
  • Reply 17 of 34
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,198member
    It amazes me the lengths these guys will go to build a fantasy around something in hopes that people believe they are committed to it. In truth Apple will drop Vision Pro entirely if it doesn't sell well enough. 
    How insighful--not. That goes for any product from any vendor. Apple has already demonstrated extreme commitment, by the way, and it shows in the quality of the product.

    Apple has said that AR is the future, and I agree. So they go and build a VR headset, something no one anywhere thinks is the future, and try to do AR with it.

    AR is all about the view finder. We already have the ability in software to do amazing things with AR, but they're nothing more than a tech demo until we get the view finder right. And a VR headset is not it. 
    You've not been paying attention... and you certainly haven't tried the VP. The device is capable of AR and VR. Apple has coined the term Spatial Computing, because the design and experience are not strictly one or the other, AR or VR.  If you read Nick Bilton's article in Vanity Fair, he says the Vision Pro makes his 75" LG OLED look antiquated. While I haven't tried the VP yet either, I'm optimistic and not so silly as to make extreme, unfounded, negative comments as you are.
    roundaboutnowdrewys808lollivermacky the mackyjas99Alex1Nwilliamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 34
    blastdoorblastdoor Posts: 3,295member
    blastdoor said:
    I’m sure it’s an impressive experience, but I can’t see myself buying one for quite a while. 

    From gruber’s review, it sounds like a heavy, fussy device that *currently* is best suited to watching movies alone on a couch. 
    I must have read a different Gruber review. He said they nailed it, and all other products in this category will copy their UX. 

    Yep he said he ran into some minor bugs but that didn’t damper his enthusiasm whatsoever:

    This is not confusing or complex, but it feels profound. […]

    But the conceptual design of VisionOS lays the foundation for an entirely new direction of interaction design. Just like how the basic concepts of the original Mac interface were exactly right, and remain true to this day. Just like how the original iPhone defined the way every phone in the world now works. […]

    The fundamental interaction model in VisionOS feels like it will be copied by all future VR/AR headsets, in the same way that all desktop computers work like the Mac, and all phones and tablets now work like the iPhone. And when that happens, some will argue that of course they all work that way, because how else could they work? But personal computers didn’t have point-and-click GUIs before the Mac, and phones didn’t have “it’s all just a big touchscreen” interfaces before the iPhone. No other headset today has a “just look at a target, and tap your finger and thumb” interface today. I suspect in a few years they all will. […]

    Spatial computing in VisionOS is the real deal. It’s a legit productivity computing platform right now, and it’s only going to get better. It sounds like hype, but I truly believe this is a landmark breakthrough like the 1984 Macintosh and the 2007 iPhone.

    https://daringfireball.net/2024/01/the_vision_pro
    Yeah, like I said -- I'm sure it's an impressive experience. That's consistent with what you quoted from his review. 

    Also, you apparently are skipping over parts of the review. He said:

    Second is the fact that Vision Pro is heavy. I’ve used it for hours at a time without any discomfort, but fatigue does set in, from the weight alone. You never forget that you’re wearing it. Related to Vision Pro’s weight is the fact that it’s quite large. It’s a big-ass pair of heavy goggles on your face. There’s nothing subtle about it — either from your first-person perspective wearing it, or from the third-person perspective of someone else looking at you while you wear it.
    And: 
    If it all sounds a little fussy, that’s because it is. But there’s no way around it: it requires a precise fit both for comfort and optical alignment.

    Also: 

    I’ve saved the best for last. Vision Pro is simply a phenomenal way to watch movies, and 3D immersive experiences are astonishing. There are 3D immersive experiences in Vision Pro that are more compelling than Disney World attractions that people wait in line for hours to see.

    So, like I said, it's an impressive experience. But it's a heavy, fussy device that *currently* is best suited to watching movies alone on a couch. 

    RespiteAlex1Nwilliamlondon
  • Reply 19 of 34
    danoxdanox Posts: 2,868member
    MacPro said:
    The main issue I see is the isolation, from watching a movie alone to the inability to work on a joint project.  I have to believe the 'loneliness' aspect will be addressed.  I assume Apple plans to include a collaborative environment in future updates.
    A joint project with multiple people/trades doesn't work to well working at home or online both in fact take a lot longer, all those construction coordination meetings in my field that use to be done in person on a contruction site/project now take four times longer online.
    edited February 1 Alex1Nwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 34
    MacProMacPro Posts: 19,727member
    MacPro said:
    The main issue I see is the isolation, from watching a movie alone to the inability to work on a joint project.  I have to believe the 'loneliness' aspect will be addressed.  I assume Apple plans to include a collaborative environment in future updates.
    Maybe you should not assume it’s not shipping with it.
    from the Verge review

    Sadly, visionOS doesn’t have any ability to share these windows or experiences with anyone else: two people in Vision Pro headsets sitting in the same room can’t see the same things floating in space at the same time. Apple tells me some enterprise developers are working on experiences with shared views, and you can mirror the view from one Vision Pro to another over FaceTime, but in the end, my big Safari art gallery only ever had one patron: me. It’s amazing you can do all of this, but it is also quite lonely to put things all over a space knowing no one else will ever really experience it.



    roundaboutnowAlex1Nwilliamlondon
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