Google obviously says that Apple RCS support will come in the fall

Posted:
in iOS edited March 29

While Apple has publicly only said that it will add RCS messaging support to iOS later in 2024, a Google announcement appears to pin it down further.

RCS support will be added to the iPhone sometime in 2024
RCS support will be added to the iPhone sometime in 2024



Apple's November 2023 announcement that it would add RCS messaging support to the iPhone, committed to it being done "later next year." The addition, possibly forced on the company by China, is presumably taking months because Apple is ignoring Google's RCS in favor of working on a new version with a standards body.

Google has launched a new page about RCS messaging, and at least at first included this extra detail about a launch in the fall.

"Apple has announced it will be adopting RCS in the fall of 2024," said Google's page. "Once that happens, it will mean a better messaging experience for everyone."

Strictly speaking, Fall 2024 starts on September 22, which is likely to be after the launch of the iPhone 16 Pro, and therefore also the public launch of iOS 18. It's not clear if it will be in the early betas of iOS 18 expected at WWDC 2024.

Note, too, that Google's page is a series of short segments that pop out to optionally offer more detail. It's sufficiently busy and with so many such elements, that this quote can't be found with a search on the page.

It can be found on an external Google search, so Googling a term like "fall of 2024 site:https://www.android.com/google-messages/" will turn it up.

Consequently, it's possible that the announcement is simply buried somewhere on the page. Or it could be that the announcement has since been removed, and Google's search is showing up only cached earlier versions.

Google's new page does quite clearly include an explanation that "RCS stands for 'Rich Communication Services' and is the modern messaging technology standard." Oddly, it doesn't mention RCS's problems, or how Google has previously failed to entirely adopt this itself.



Read on AppleInsider

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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 21
    lam92103lam92103 Posts: 124member
    And why should I care? No one uses RCS. 
    jfreedle2williamlondon9secondkox2igorskywatto_cobra
  • Reply 2 of 21
    Just more proof that Google does spy on everyone and cannot be trusted.
    9secondkox2igorskyolswatto_cobra
  • Reply 3 of 21
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,211member
    jfreedle2 said:
    Just more proof that Google does spy on everyone and cannot be trusted.
    In case you're interested in facts more than FUD...
    Google cannot see the contents of any RCS Google Messages. They are encrypted end-to-end, from your device which encrypts them, to the receiver's phone, where they are decrypted. It is equally as secure and private as iMessage, and at least in one way even more so than Apple's Messaging.  At the very worst they might be able to log metadata, same as Apple can, which is hardly the same as seeing the contents of a message.

    If you are comfortable with others potentially being able to read your RCS messages sent from your iPhone, just as they can read SMS messages now, then it won't matter if the GSMA ever makes encryption part of the standard.  They might not, and I don't think Apple will care. The GSMA has had years to do so and have ignored it despite Google's pushing them to add it. Encryption is not in the interests of the carriers, and they have been the ones leading the RCS standards body.  

    So until there's movement on that front, while iPhone owners cannot be assured of RCS privacy and security, Google Messages users will be. That is unless an iPhone user enters that conversation and breaks the security with Apple's RCS. There's been no mention of Google requiring those unencrypted iPhone messages to display a different bubble color in Google Messages but IMO, they will likely have green bubbles as default, the same as the insecure fallback SMS now has, while blue is reserved for Google's encrypted and secure communications.

    Of course an Android owner can choose to change the colors from the defaults, even to specific contacts in a conversation. 
    edited March 29 bala1234ctt_zhmuthuk_vanalingamPetrolDaveAlex1N9secondkox2
  • Reply 4 of 21
    danoxdanox Posts: 2,840member
    gatorguy said:
    jfreedle2 said:
    Just more proof that Google does spy on everyone and cannot be trusted.
    In case you're interested in facts more than FUD...
    Google cannot see the contents of any RCS Google Messages. They are encrypted end-to-end, from your device which encrypts them, to the receiver's phone, where they are decrypted. It is equally as secure and private as iMessage, in one way even more so.  A the very worst they might be able to log metadata, same as Apple can, hardly the same as seeing the contents of a message

    If you are comfortable with others potentially being able to read your RCS messages sent from your iPhone, just as they can read SMS messages now, then it won't matter if the GSMA ever makes encryption part of the standard, and they might not. They've had years to do so and have ignored it despite Google's pushing them to add it. It's not in the interests of the carriers to do so, and they are the ones heading up the RCS standard. 
    Hoovering is Google and Meta middle name.......
    williamlondonkillroy9secondkox2StrangeDaysolswatto_cobra
  • Reply 5 of 21
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,211member
    danox said:
    gatorguy said:
    jfreedle2 said:
    Just more proof that Google does spy on everyone and cannot be trusted.
    In case you're interested in facts more than FUD...
    Google cannot see the contents of any RCS Google Messages. They are encrypted end-to-end, from your device which encrypts them, to the receiver's phone, where they are decrypted. It is equally as secure and private as iMessage, in one way even more so.  A the very worst they might be able to log metadata, same as Apple can, hardly the same as seeing the contents of a message

    If you are comfortable with others potentially being able to read your RCS messages sent from your iPhone, just as they can read SMS messages now, then it won't matter if the GSMA ever makes encryption part of the standard, and they might not. They've had years to do so and have ignored it despite Google's pushing them to add it. It's not in the interests of the carriers to do so, and they are the ones heading up the RCS standard. 
    Hoovering is Google and Meta middle name.......
    Isn't it interesting that this time, Apple is leaving the shed door hung open and the handle broken for easier entry by unwanted visitors, while Google is the one with the automatic door locks on the reinforced garden gate? 
    edited March 29 bala1234ctt_zh9secondkox2
  • Reply 6 of 21
    lam92103 said:
    And why should I care? No one uses RCS. 
    Don't they?

    I mean, isn't it the default on Android, with a fallback to SMS like on the iPhone?

    I honestly don't know.  I'm trying to get my Android friends to use Signal instead of text messages, but it's hard to convince them.
    killroy9secondkox2
  • Reply 7 of 21
    bala1234bala1234 Posts: 144member
    Call me dumb but I am not getting the 'obvious' part here! Somebody who knows, care to explain?
    killroygatorguyctt_zhwatto_cobra
  • Reply 8 of 21
    netroxnetrox Posts: 1,418member
    Maybe Google is offering Apple its AI project for RCS. 
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 9 of 21
    9secondkox29secondkox2 Posts: 2,702member
    bala1234 said:
    Call me dumb but I am not getting the 'obvious' part here! Somebody who knows, care to explain?
    Apple will be offering it, but Google feels the need to be the announcer. In other words, it’s obvious that it’s coming (apple has already given hints) and it’s also obvious that Google (being, you know, Google) wants to pretend that it’s their announcement to make and try to spin it as Google getting one over on apple. 

    At least thats what it seems like to this reader. 
    edited March 30 danoxbala1234watto_cobra
  • Reply 10 of 21
    davidwdavidw Posts: 2,047member
    gatorguy said:
    jfreedle2 said:
    Just more proof that Google does spy on everyone and cannot be trusted.
    In case you're interested in facts more than FUD...
    Google cannot see the contents of any RCS Google Messages. They are encrypted end-to-end, from your device which encrypts them, to the receiver's phone, where they are decrypted. It is equally as secure and private as iMessage, and at least in one way even more so than Apple's Messaging.  At the very worst they might be able to log metadata, same as Apple can, which is hardly the same as seeing the contents of a message.

    If you are comfortable with others potentially being able to read your RCS messages sent from your iPhone, just as they can read SMS messages now, then it won't matter if the GSMA ever makes encryption part of the standard.  They might not, and I don't think Apple will care. The GSMA has had years to do so and have ignored it despite Google's pushing them to add it. Encryption is not in the interests of the carriers, and they have been the ones leading the RCS standards body.  

    So until there's movement on that front, while iPhone owners cannot be assured of RCS privacy and security, Google Messages users will be. That is unless an iPhone user enters that conversation and breaks the security with Apple's RCS. There's been no mention of Google requiring those unencrypted iPhone messages to display a different bubble color in Google Messages but IMO, they will likely have green bubbles as default, the same as the insecure fallback SMS now has, while blue is reserved for Google's encrypted and secure communications.

    Of course an Android owner can choose to change the colors from the defaults, even to specific contacts in a conversation. 

    That is FUD. Google can see the contents of any RCS messages where the receiver is not using Google Messages or do not have RCS enabled on their Android phone. RCS will default to SMS in these cases. Google can also read RCS messages in a group chat if anyone in the group is not using Google Messages (with RCS enabled). It's no different than than the chat on iMessage. Not every Android users wants to use Google Messages and Google messages is the only way to send and receive RCS with E2EE. (Also Samsung has an exclusive (and confidential deal) with Google so Samsung Phones users using Samsung Messages can also send and receive RCS with E2EE.)

    Right now about 1B Android users Worldwide have RCS enabled on their Android phones. That's out of about 4B Android phones. This means that when using Google Messages to send a RCS message, 3 out of 4 Android phones will get it as an SMS message and Google can read it. When Apple adopts RCS, that will increase the number of RCS users by 100%. And of course, all the RSC messages sent or received from an iPhone can be read by Google because Apple have adopted the Universal Profile of RCS and not Google proprietary version (of RCS) with E2EE.



    Maybe in the US, Google Messages is popular. But in the rest of the World, the majority of Android users are not using it, even though by now, every Android phone is capable of RCS messaging with E2EE. And why isn't Google RCS more popular on Android? Maybe because it's still inferior to messaging services like WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, Signal, Telegram, etc.. RCS is turned off by default and many Android users just don't want to or bother to, enable RCS. To many, RCS is like SMS in that it's a messaging service that is provided by their carrier and there are plenty of better messaging service out there and right now, most are cross platform. 

    And maybe many don't want to enable RCS because of this  ....





    In this digital age of the internet, why in the name of Hell would anyone want to use a messaging service that requires a mobile phone number, uses it as the ID and requires the support of the carrier, before it can be used on the phone? 


    >It’s worth noting that you cannot use RCS without a SIM card in your device. RCS might only rely on Wi-Fi and mobile data but it still needs a mobile network to function.<







    williamlondonStrangeDayswatto_cobrarorschachai
  • Reply 11 of 21
    davidwdavidw Posts: 2,047member
    lam92103 said:
    And why should I care? No one uses RCS. 
    Don't they?

    I mean, isn't it the default on Android, with a fallback to SMS like on the iPhone?

    I honestly don't know.  I'm trying to get my Android friends to use Signal instead of text messages, but it's hard to convince them.

    No. RCS is not the "default" on Android. Even though every Android phone is capable of RCS (with E2EE), it is disabled in Google Messages by default. But I believe Google Messages is the default for SMS on Android. The funny thing is that there is no other choice for RCS on Android. Either one enable RCS in Google Messages or one can't message with RCS. Except with some Samsung phones where RCS can be enabled in Samsung Messages. But not Google proprietary RCS with E2EE, which requires Google Messages. This was allowed through a special deal with Google, as nearly all other Android phones can only use Google Messages for RCS.

    Samsung phones with Samsung Messages actually supported carriers RCS for over 10 years. But recently had to rely on Google Messages because the most carriers are only supporting Google proprietary RCS, that must use Google Messages on the device.


    edited March 30 williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 12 of 21
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,211member
    davidw said:
    gatorguy said:
    jfreedle2 said:
    Just more proof that Google does spy on everyone and cannot be trusted.
    In case you're interested in facts more than FUD...
    Google cannot see the contents of any RCS Google Messages. They are encrypted end-to-end, from your device which encrypts them, to the receiver's phone, where they are decrypted. It is equally as secure and private as iMessage...

    If you are comfortable with others potentially being able to read your RCS messages sent from your iPhone, just as they can read SMS messages now, then it won't matter if the GSMA ever makes encryption part of the standard.  ... while iPhone owners cannot be assured of RCS privacy and security, Google Messages users will be. That is unless an iPhone user enters that conversation and breaks the security with Apple's RCS. ...they will likely have green bubbles as default, the same as the insecure fallback SMS now has, while blue is reserved for Google's encrypted and secure communications.


    That is FUD. (So you say, but where specifically? I can't find it...)
      Google can see the contents of any RCS messages where the receiver is not using Google Messages or do not have RCS enabled...(Well duh, then it wouldn't be Google Messages RCS would it?).
      RCS will default to SMS in these cases (Oh, so not using Google Messages RCS? Double-Duh).
      Google can also read RCS messages in a group chat if anyone in the group is not using Google Messages with RCS enabled (Yup, for instance when an Apple RCS user or any other insecure protocol will join the conversation as I pointed out?).
      It's no different than than the chat on iMessage.  (TRIPLE-Duh!)
      Not every Android users wants to use Google Messages and Google messages is the only way to send and receive RCS with E2EE. (OMG, like not every Apple user outside of the US wants to use iMessage and that's the only way to get Apple's E2EE message security??)
    You could save a lot of wind by reading what someone actually says first. Start with the second sentence in my post, and the first sentence of your reply.

    I made it easier for you to parse by fixing your post.

    edited March 30 avon b7ctt_zh
  • Reply 13 of 21
    cpsrocpsro Posts: 3,198member
    gatorguy said:
    Isn't it interesting that this time, Apple is leaving the shed door hung open and the handle broken for easier entry by unwanted visitors, while Google is the one with the automatic door locks on the reinforced garden gate? 
    Took them long enough. If it wasn't for Apple having a better messaging system, Google wouldn't have closed the encryption gap.
    Google's Terms of Service still suck.
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 14 of 21
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,211member
    cpsro said:
    gatorguy said:
    Isn't it interesting that this time, Apple is leaving the shed door hung open and the handle broken for easier entry by unwanted visitors, while Google is the one with the automatic door locks on the reinforced garden gate? 
    Took them long enough. If it wasn't for Apple having a better messaging system, Google wouldn't have closed the encryption gap.
    Google's Terms of Service still suck.
    Everyones' ToS suck. How many pages should it take to explain user and provider rights?

    But you're right that Apple and Google generally push each other to be better. When one offers something the other doesn't they do tend to bridge the gap sooner or later. Here's another privacy feature coming to Android, one that Apple should copy: Location Privacy HAL.

    It offers users control over when location data is shared with a cellular network. HAL can
     block these requests, which could protect against stingray devices and potential abuse by stalkers and other miscreants.
    https://www.androidauthority.com/android-15-location-privacy-3429574/
    edited March 30
  • Reply 15 of 21
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,211member
    davidw said:
    lam92103 said:
    And why should I care? No one uses RCS. 
    Don't they?

    I mean, isn't it the default on Android, with a fallback to SMS like on the iPhone?

    I honestly don't know.  I'm trying to get my Android friends to use Signal instead of text messages, but it's hard to convince them.

    No. RCS is not the "default" on Android. Even though every Android phone is capable of RCS (with E2EE), it is disabled in Google Messages by default. 
    You are once again incorrect. 

    Yes, RCS is enabled by default for all new and existing users of Google's Messages app, unless the user purposefully disabled it in their Settings some time ago. Otherwise it is active and on, and has been that way since last August.  If a Google Messages user does not want to use RCS it must be toggled off. The app will continue to work, but without Google's encrypted RCS. 

    A user can also toggle on or off read receipts and typing indicators to control whether conversants know if they are replying or have even seen a message. 
    edited March 30 ctt_zhmuthuk_vanalingam
  • Reply 16 of 21
    bala1234bala1234 Posts: 144member
    bala1234 said:
    Call me dumb but I am not getting the 'obvious' part here! Somebody who knows, care to explain?
    Apple will be offering it, but Google feels the need to be the announcer. In other words, it’s obvious that it’s coming (apple has already given hints) and it’s also obvious that Google (being, you know, Google) wants to pretend that it’s their announcement to make and try to spin it as Google getting one over on apple. 

    At least thats what it seems like to this reader. 
    Thank you! I never would have figured it out by myself!
    watto_cobra
  • Reply 17 of 21
    igorskyigorsky Posts: 754member
    bala1234 said:
    Call me dumb but I am not getting the 'obvious' part here! Somebody who knows, care to explain?
    It’s already been announced by Apple. This is only a self-serving announcement by Google designed to boost their own product in, what they view as, their competition against iMessage. 
    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 18 of 21
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,211member
    igorsky said:
    bala1234 said:
    Call me dumb but I am not getting the 'obvious' part here! Somebody who knows, care to explain?
    It’s already been announced by Apple. This is only a self-serving announcement by Google designed to boost their own product in, what they view as, their competition against iMessage. 
    Apple never announced it wasn't coming until this fall did they? I remember only a vague "later, in 2024". 
    edited March 31 ctt_zhbala1234
  • Reply 19 of 21
    davidwdavidw Posts: 2,047member
    gatorguy said:
    davidw said:
    gatorguy said:
    jfreedle2 said:
    Just more proof that Google does spy on everyone and cannot be trusted.
    In case you're interested in facts more than FUD...
    Google cannot see the contents of any RCS Google Messages. They are encrypted end-to-end, from your device which encrypts them, to the receiver's phone, where they are decrypted. It is equally as secure and private as iMessage...

    If you are comfortable with others potentially being able to read your RCS messages sent from your iPhone, just as they can read SMS messages now, then it won't matter if the GSMA ever makes encryption part of the standard.  ... while iPhone owners cannot be assured of RCS privacy and security, Google Messages users will be. That is unless an iPhone user enters that conversation and breaks the security with Apple's RCS. ...they will likely have green bubbles as default, the same as the insecure fallback SMS now has, while blue is reserved for Google's encrypted and secure communications.


    That is FUD. (So you say, but where specifically? I can't find it...)
      Google can see the contents of any RCS messages where the receiver is not using Google Messages or do not have RCS enabled...(Well duh, then it wouldn't be Google Messages RCS would it?).
      RCS will default to SMS in these cases (Oh, so not using Google Messages RCS? Double-Duh).
      Google can also read RCS messages in a group chat if anyone in the group is not using Google Messages with RCS enabled (Yup, for instance when an Apple RCS user or any other insecure protocol will join the conversation as I pointed out?).
      It's no different than than the chat on iMessage.  (TRIPLE-Duh!)
      Not every Android users wants to use Google Messages and Google messages is the only way to send and receive RCS with E2EE. (OMG, like not every Apple user outside of the US wants to use iMessage and that's the only way to get Apple's E2EE message security??)
    You could save a lot of wind by reading what someone actually says first. Start with the second sentence in my post, and the first sentence of your reply.

    I made it easier for you to parse by fixing your post.

    When you posted your comment, just exactly how did it pertain to the comment you were responding to ........ "Just more proof that Google does spy on everyone and cannot be trusted." What made to think that it was referring to Google RCS Messages with E2EE. Were you so offended about the implication that Google might be spy on everyone, that you didn't see the obvious? That the comment was referring to how Google got so much info about Apple pending adoption of RCS, when Apple only made public that they will adopt RCS sometime in 2024.

    But yet you took a comment that had nothing to do with Google RCS Messages, in order to say something negative about Apple. Par for the course with you.


    But since you already moved the goal post. You stated, in bold none the less, that ..... "Google cannot see the contents of any RCS Google Messages". That is a bold lie and FUD. What Google can not see is the content of RCS messages that are E2EEed. Not all Google RCS messages are E2EEed. In order for Google RCS messages to have E2EE, both sender and receiver must have RCS enabled in Google Messages. The fact that Google RCS messages will default to SMS, is part of Google RCS Messages. It is built into Google RCS messaging protocol. If it did not default to SMS for the receivers that do not have RCS enabled, then it's not Google RCS messaging. Regardless if the receivers have RCS disabled, one is still using Google RCS Messages to send them a message. One using Google Messages with RCS enabled, do not have to use some other messaging protocol to send a message to an Android user that have RCS disabled in Google Messages. And I'm willing to bet that most of the messages sent with Google RCS are not E2EEed, if only about 25% of Android phones are using RCS.

    And in a group chat, it's not only Apple device users that will break the E2EE. An Android user with RCS disabled in Google Messages will also break the E2EE for the group. And with 3 out of 4 Android users not using RCS, that will more likely be the case. 

    If and Apple device user uses iMessage to send a message to an Android user, iMessage will convert the message to SMS so the Android user will receive it, That doesn't mean the the Apple user did not use iMessage to send the message. iMessage was designed to do just that.

    BTW- E2EE only prevent Google (and anyone for that matter) from reading the contents of a Google RCS Message, after it's sent and before it's received. Once the message is decrypted in the receiver phone, Google can read its contents. All one has to do to prove this is to ask Google Assistance to read out loud your text messages. Many users do this while driving. And one can ask Google Assistance to send a message that you dictated. Apple Siri can do the same. The same would be true when using Spell Check or Auto-Correct when sending a text message. It's only a matter of trust that makes us think Google is not reading (or scanning) the contents of text messages while un-ecrypted in the phone, without permission. 




    williamlondonwatto_cobra
  • Reply 20 of 21
    gatorguygatorguy Posts: 24,211member
    davidw said:
    gatorguy said:
    davidw said:
    gatorguy said:
    jfreedle2 said:
    Just more proof that Google does spy on everyone and cannot be trusted.
    In case you're interested in facts more than FUD...
    Google cannot see the contents of any RCS Google Messages. They are encrypted end-to-end, from your device which encrypts them, to the receiver's phone, where they are decrypted. It is equally as secure and private as iMessage...

    If you are comfortable with others potentially being able to read your RCS messages sent from your iPhone, just as they can read SMS messages now, then it won't matter if the GSMA ever makes encryption part of the standard.  ... while iPhone owners cannot be assured of RCS privacy and security, Google Messages users will be. That is unless an iPhone user enters that conversation and breaks the security with Apple's RCS. ...they will likely have green bubbles as default, the same as the insecure fallback SMS now has, while blue is reserved for Google's encrypted and secure communications.


    That is FUD. (So you say, but where specifically? I can't find it...)
      Google can see the contents of any RCS messages where the receiver is not using Google Messages or do not have RCS enabled...(Well duh, then it wouldn't be Google Messages RCS would it?).
      RCS will default to SMS in these cases (Oh, so not using Google Messages RCS? Double-Duh).
      Google can also read RCS messages in a group chat if anyone in the group is not using Google Messages with RCS enabled (Yup, for instance when an Apple RCS user or any other insecure protocol will join the conversation as I pointed out?).
      It's no different than than the chat on iMessage.  (TRIPLE-Duh!)
      Not every Android users wants to use Google Messages and Google messages is the only way to send and receive RCS with E2EE. (OMG, like not every Apple user outside of the US wants to use iMessage and that's the only way to get Apple's E2EE message security??)
    You could save a lot of wind by reading what someone actually says first. Start with the second sentence in my post, and the first sentence of your reply.

    I made it easier for you to parse by fixing your post.

     You stated, in bold none the less, that ..... "Google cannot see the contents of any RCS Google Messages". That is a bold lie and FUD. What Google can not see is the content of RCS messages that are E2EEed. Not all Google RCS messages are E2EEed.
    (Wrong: EVERY Google RCS message is by default encrypted, including group RCS messages. You cannot turn off encyption and still use Google RCS, only opt out altogether. You are obviously confused. Google RCS is part of Google Messages and offers security and privacy equal to iMessage. It will still handle unecrypted SMS, ala Apple Message, and upcoming Apple RCS, but with no guarantee of privacy or security)

    BTW- E2EE only prevent Google (and anyone for that matter) from reading the contents of a Google RCS Message, after it's sent and before it's received. Once the message is decrypted in the receiver phone, Google can read its contents.
    (Nope. It remains unreadable by Google because the company doesn't possess a key,  just like an iMessage on your iPhone which Apple cannot read*)

    All one has to do to prove this is to ask Google Assistance to read out loud your text messages.
    (Except it's not proof LOL.  Convert text to speech is done privately and securely on the owners smartphone, not in the cloud)
     
    The same would be true when using Spell Check or Auto-Correct when sending a text message
    (Nope, wrong again. There are two types of correction, basic and advanced. The basic version used on phones doesn't send any correction requests to Google. It's all done on device, and yes it's private and secure, never leaving your phone. The ADVANCED corrections that may need to be done by Google are used for Google Search and Chrome)



    This time you quadrupled down on being wrong. I've done you the favor of pointing out why, attached to each of your pertinent offending sentences. Again.

    Do you research stuff before bursting out with "Liar!" ?? It appears not.
    Perhaps you should slow your roll until you triple-check and confirm facts. Even then tossing out 'Lie" is above and beyond. I know for fact that you are wrong, but that would not make you a liar. I would not claim you are one, in any event.


    *Unless you have Advanced Data Protection on your cloud account, Apple CAN read them from your backup because they can access the key, and deliver them in a readable format to a third party on receipt of a legal order.
    By default, Google Messages are encrypted even in your cloud account, truly E2EE with no special handling or toggles needed. Google has no key, cannot access your key, and cannot otherwise decrypt or offer them in a readable format in compliance with a legal demand.
    edited March 31 ctt_zh
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