The Music Industry and iTunes...

Posted:
in iPod + iTunes + AppleTV edited January 2014
Can someone explain me how and why "the 5 Majors" praised iTunes and the new MusicStore since:



1 - Any AAC encoded (protected) file can be converted in aiff (un-protected) and then again, re-encoded in mp3 for sharing, with minimal loss in terms of quality.

(Toast and many other apps can do that for you)



2 - The new music sharing feature of iTunes (and all the present and future "trackers" apps that are gonna pop in the coming weeks) makes iTunes users at the center of the biggest, organised, and of course 'free' music library.



3 - One could think you could only listen to shared music. But yes, you can also grab it with specific apps !



To me, this sound like better than Napster.

How could the music industry say 'Ok' to Jobs ?
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Comments

  • Reply 1 of 24
    This puts a ligitamate 'face' on the whole issue. Most folks aren't willing to put that kind of time into sneakyness. They want .99 cent songs which they can get in a matter of moments. This cuts down on searching P2P or borrowing friends CD collections.



    iTunes is a convenience. Sure people will abuse it (they always do) but the majority of people will pay and play nice. Remember, this is the FIRST of it's kind to actually work so record companies are glad to be seeing some money.
  • Reply 2 of 24
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    Jobs convinced them that they can't stop all piracy, that they can only stop the really obvious, easy stuff and the rest, as Jobs puts it, is a "social" problem. How many people are going to go through the hoops to pirate and distribute music with this thing? The theory is that very few would bother. It's not meant to plug all the holes, it's meant to plug the big honking ones.
  • Reply 3 of 24
    zouniczounic Posts: 53member
    Fine.

    I'm actually listening some Tom Waits songs, connected to an IP I got with 'ServerStore', a little Tracker-like app.

    This guy I'm connected to could be in France, Spain, China or the US... I don't know.



    But technically, he is a Broadcaster. Broadcasters are supposed to pay a tax. And there's going to be a lot now...
  • Reply 4 of 24
    Quote:

    Originally posted by zounic

    Broadcasters are supposed to pay a tax.



    Which tax is that? And if there is no profit being made how is it taxable? The recording industry does NOT own listening rights (contrary to popular belief). Provided he is not making any money from his 'broadcast' he is fine. Snag that to the 'he isn't broadcasting, he is simply hosting a stream, you initiate the download so perhaps YOU should be taxed' argument there really isn't any legal problems here.



    Can't you just smile and nod? If you wanna pirate, pirate. But don't knock a more then decent attempt at making this industry legit.
  • Reply 5 of 24
    zouniczounic Posts: 53member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by Not Unlike Myself

    Can't you just smile and nod



    I Do ;-)
  • Reply 6 of 24
    hmurchisonhmurchison Posts: 12,145member
    He means ASCAP Performance rights.
  • Reply 7 of 24
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    Would a fair analogy be that it's like hearing someone else playing music from their stereo in the park?
  • Reply 8 of 24
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BuonRotto

    Would a fair analogy be that it's like hearing someone else playing music from their stereo in the park?



    Yes. That's fair.
  • Reply 9 of 24
    jlljll Posts: 2,709member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by zounic

    2 - The new music sharing feature of iTunes (and all the present and future "trackers" apps that are gonna pop in the coming weeks) makes iTunes users at the center of the biggest, organised, and of course 'free' music library.



    But that has nothing to do with ITMS - you can't share m4p files.





    Quote:

    Originally posted by zounic

    3 - One could think you could only listen to shared music. But yes, you can also grab it with specific apps !



    Again, you can't do it with the files that the Big 5 are selling.
  • Reply 10 of 24
    zouniczounic Posts: 53member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by JLL

    you can't share m4p files.



    Yes you can. You can convert an AAC mp4 in aiff with Toast (or any other app.) and re-import in iTunes, mp3 encoded.

    It's a 2nd generation encoding, but AAC is good enough so that the loss of quality is unnoticable (to most of us).
  • Reply 11 of 24
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    zounic has a good point about the proliferation of this sort of thing. I just read on MacSlash that sPyMac has set up their own server for streaming these libraries, which is probably coming very close to pissing off the RIAA fair or not. Remember that twhen you click on that Sharing checkbox in iTunes the first time, it reminds you that it's for personal use only. Is there a cap to the number of people who can connect to your iTunes library at a time? If not, I can imagine that if this keeps up, Apple will probably implement a way to do just that. A worse scenario is that Apple will either have to eliminate the feature, at least the IP sharing part to please the RIAA, or the worst case scenario is that all bets are off: RIAA takes it bat and ball and goes home.
  • Reply 12 of 24
    frawgzfrawgz Posts: 547member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by zounic

    Yes you can. You can convert an AAC mp4 in aiff with Toast (or any other app.) and re-import in iTunes, mp3 encoded.

    It's a 2nd generation encoding, but AAC is good enough so that the loss of quality is unnoticable (to most of us).




    He's referring to m4p files, music that is bought from the iTMS and needs to be authorized to be played over a shared connection.



    Again, shared music is not pirated music. They are literally sharing it with you, and once the connection is lost, the music is no longer yours to play whenever you want. You can't burn it onto a CD, you can't take it with you on your iPod. Sure, there are ways you can steal it using certain programs, but this was always true, even before Apple. You can't stop piracy. The end.



    The point is, however, that you can promote legitimacy.
  • Reply 13 of 24
    jlljll Posts: 2,709member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by zounic

    Yes you can. You can convert an AAC mp4 in aiff with Toast (or any other app.) and re-import in iTunes, mp3 encoded.

    It's a 2nd generation encoding, but AAC is good enough so that the loss of quality is unnoticable (to most of us).




    But why would you do all that just so others can get a song you paid for for free?
  • Reply 14 of 24
    shetlineshetline Posts: 4,695member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BuonRotto

    Is there a cap to the number of people who can connect to your iTunes library at a time?



    I believe there is a cap... and for some reason the number 3 pops into my mind. I think that's also the limit on authorized copies of purchased music (though I can't remember if it's 3 inclusive or exclusive of the original purchaser).



    Even without an enforced limit, the vast majority of iTunes servers won't be able to support more than two users at a time anyway. Come to think of it, since most of my music is 192Kbits/sec stuff, if I get more than one person trying to listen to my library at one time, my cable modem's 256Kbits/sec upload limit is going to max out, and then everyone listening is going to start getting timeouts and rebuffering galore.
  • Reply 15 of 24
    shetlineshetline Posts: 4,695member
    Hmmm... now when I think about this more, I imagine that when iTunes for Windows comes out, and I can listen to my home library from my PC at the office, I'll probably have to turn on the password protection feature to make sure that I can get into my own music without worrying about competing with someone else for bandwidth.
  • Reply 16 of 24
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    According to the folks posting at MacSlash, the limit for shared library listeners is 5, well below any definition of broadcasting. The 3 magic number is the max number of authorized users to share the Music Store files.
  • Reply 17 of 24
    shetlineshetline Posts: 4,695member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BuonRotto

    According to the folks posting at MacSlash, the limit for shared library listeners is 5, well below any definition of broadcasting.



    That should be quite good enough for a home network, and still well above what most of us could stream out into the internet-at-large due to upload bandwidth limitations.



    The 3 magic number is the max number of authorized users to share the Music Store files..



    Do you know if that's inclusive or exclusive of the original purchaser? I can share with three other people, or just two others, because I'd be the third?
  • Reply 18 of 24
    jlljll Posts: 2,709member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by shetline

    The 3 magic number is the max number of authorized users to share the Music Store files..



    Do you know if that's inclusive or exclusive of the original purchaser? I can share with three other people, or just two others, because I'd be the third?




    It's three copies of iTunes - including the one you bought the song from.



    But remember that if you let others authorize their iTunes so they can hear the music you bought, you are also giving them acces to your 1-Click account.
  • Reply 19 of 24
    buonrottobuonrotto Posts: 6,368member
    What JLL said: three, including you, and they need your Apple ID and password.



    Does rendezvous sharing allow streaming of your bought iTunes Store files?
  • Reply 20 of 24
    jlljll Posts: 2,709member
    Quote:

    Originally posted by BuonRotto

    Does rendezvous sharing allow streaming of your bought iTunes Store files?



    Only to authorized iTunes.
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